Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 1 month ago

How ParentMD Makes It Easier for Parents to Find Healthcare Information

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Parents have a lot on their plate when it comes to the health of their children.  

With misinformation at an all-time high, it’s left up to them to do the research and sort through all the information to find trusted resources and advice. It can be scary and oftentimes overwhelming. 

What if there was a better way? 

Dr. Josh Honaker, CEO & Founder of ParentMD and Honaker Health, sought to find it and through a partnership with parents and pediatricians, he created ParentMD. In this episode, he shares what the company is all about.

We discuss:

  • How he built ParentMD
  • Creating an environment that can be trusted
  • COVID vaccines for children and vaccine mandates
  • Emerging healthcare innovations like augmented reality 

Resources mentioned during the podcast:

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. 

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player

So I so want this to be seen as apartnership with Patricians, not just a resource for parents, but a resourcefor Patricians to augment the Education for the patients when they honestlyusually need more than any of us could ever give in the office visit. You were listening to heroes of healthcare. The podcast that highlights gold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's getinto the shell. Welcome to the heroes of health care,podcast Om, your host Ted Wayne before we jump into today's program. I justwanted to take a moment to thank all of our loyal listeners. Last week welaunched episode twenty five and were coming up on our one year anniversaryof the podcast. What started off as a passion project has grown into over sixthousand downloads and over eighty five star reviews on apple, so we justwanted to say on behalf of the heroes of health care team. Thank you for allof you who continue to support the program and are sharing it with yourfriends in social media. Please keep spreading the word as we continue tohighlight those selfless individuals who are providing compassion and careso after this nice. Thank you. Now, let's get on to today's show today, I'mjoined by Dr Josh Haneke Dor Haneke is a board certified pediatrician, whoserves as CEO and founder of parent M D and Hannek Er health. He started hiscareer in two thousand and one in Oldham County pediatrics, where he wasco founder and practicing pediatrician until he became the chief General ofPediatrics at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in twothousand and nine just prior to his position. He was also the part timechief medical officer at Baptist Hospital, the Grange and President ofthe Kentucky Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics in two thousandand twelve. He became Vice President Medical Director of the Norton MedicalGroup, where he served until two thousand and twenty one in his finalrole as chief medical, administrative officer, originally from Bolling GreenKentucky, where he completed his undergraduate degree in biology andchemistry at Western Kentucky University and on Sand Nine hundred andninety four. Then he completed his medical school degree at the Universityof Louisville. He then completed his pediatric residency at NortonChildren's Hospital and he's a father of two grown sons. He loves the outdoorand enjoys working with health care entrepreneurial activities. It is ourpleasure to welcome Doctor Josh Haneke to the heroes of health care, welcometo the heroes of health care, podcast octane ker thanks for joining us. Nothanks for having me well we're going to dive into lots of different thingshere this morning and thank you for your time and being on the show. Iwould love to kick off, though, if you could just give the listeners a littlebit about your background, where you came from what got you into medicine,what makes you so passionate about doing what you do and and we'll talkmore about par en m D, but you know: what's got you passionate around thatand the world of pediatrics yeah happy to so appreciate you environment, tothe show I have I was born in Kentucky and have not left Kentucky. I grew upin Bowling Green home on the corvette and right down the road from MammothCave and came to Louisville back in one thousand nine hundred and ninety fourto go to medical school. The University of loal did my PTERIAN. It cost herchildren's hospital and then right after that, I started a practice andout in the suburbs of view of little called Olden canny pediatrics and didthat for a number of years enjoyed that start of the group do Novo Zeropatients and we grew up to eight doctors in eight years and had a lot offun and success with that was doing a lot of different leadershiproles. I was in Voto do some different speak engagements at the medical schooland chief medical ass for the local hospital one day a week and so wasinvited by the medical school to come back and be the chief of generalpediatrics, and so I did that left my private practice and did that for acouple of years and then was invited to Norton healthcare in Lowell about tenyears ago to be the chief metal officer of the Norton Medical Group at thattime is about three hundred and fifty providers, and and now it's aboutseventeen hundred providers. I left that position about six months ago togo on entrepreneur journey. I also had my MBA from a few years ago and beeninvolved in a number of Etton activities on the side and decide tostart two companies, one called Hanuki health and another called parent M d.So that's what I've been working on for the last six months, and so I've beenin private practice, academics in the corporate world and now largely dealwith startups and provide a little consulting. Well, so it sounds like youhave been busy, which is good, but tell us a little bit about what did you seein the market that made you go? Will call it the entrepreneurial route or tocreate some of these products and platforms that you're doing what? Whatmade you push, then that direction so going back to private practice, and youknow my twenty plus years in medicine. I've just noted that you know. First ofall, health cares complex and there are a a lot of resources out there,especially for parents. There's a lot...

...out there on the Internet and at tenthe day, parents have to do a lot of work, that to the love, homework andsearch and identify trust, his sources, and then they have to go through it.All and a lot of the sources are conflicting and their information, andI would say a lot of it's not derived by Bor servite pediatricians. So fromgoing back from private practice to recent years, just start talking toparents more and and understanding and looking myself to see on the Internetwas there really a site dedicated to parents but lay by pediatricians. Theonly thing like that really is American Cami pediatrics, which they do a greatjob, but I feel like there could be one filling: the gap of doing the homeworkfor parents and even a better way, and so definitely want to work in concertwith the AAP and other organizations out there. But I got talking to parentsand and many said that they would like to have more information that was videovideos of pediatricians talking straight to the parents. Okay, and so Ihad this idea of tool kits and then I had parents saying I wish I had aconference replace. I could go to her webinars, where the doctors were justtalking to me about pediatric topics, and I got looking and thinking- and Ididn't really see anything like that existing either. So I came up with theidea of parent and D as a company that say on the Internet, and that isfocused on parents but led by pediatricians, but guide by parents tobring content. We do the homework for you. We package in the form of two kids.We have a podcast there's multiple things. I want to do in the futurearound webinars and conferences, just for parents, and I want parents to be aheavy part of that team. Helping Derive and identify what parents want need,but it's my job to go, find the best patricians in the country bring a backpackage in a way that is digestible one and you can hit an easy button forparents so, instead of needing to go to Webmd or another Reputa resource with alot of information and find information on food allergies. Well, I went tonorthwestern and Chicago and got doctee, who is the world's leading pediatricauthority on food allergies, with the large nh grand just wrote, a couple obooks and I brought her to the table, brought her to the studio and wecranked out a tool kit for food allergies, for parents and and thenshe's, given her recommendations and she's speaking right to parents whatshe shares with all of her patients. But we pack in a way that's easy. Soyou don't need to go. Look at the Internet and you just read her articleshard book listener, videos with us and you got everything you need in oneplace, so we're cutting through the sea of this information in a way. It's atrust. It's a trusted source for parents to go and where they feel likethey're, getting the board certified expert to deliver the information thatthey're looking for correct, correct and is the site organized under? How doyou know? How do you have or how do you envision parent M D being organized asif by those medical topics is it? How are you organizing the information tomake it the tool kit, as you said, easy to navigate or easy for the parent WHO's? Looking for theinformation to find right, so I'M gonna go back to the very beginning. I had avision of all these things I wanted to bring in there and a lot of things havebeen put in the parking lot for version to version three also had always goingto be a portal for pediatricians, but long store short with a soft launch andearly September. We just put out there that a podcast that we do and then thetoolkits and they're packaged by larger topics. So with that being said, thereare ten tool kits. We have on the site right now on Parendo and they rangedfrom everything from OCD to eating disorders, to breast feeding, foodallergies, asthma. Some topics that, based on different child health expertson I was acquainted with, I thought, would be a good fit to get started with,who would be compassionate relatable, articulate and experts in their filled.I went to them honestly. The most popular topics that parents want to goto for such things are really in the first three years of life and they'rein those spaces of the new morn topics, but I feel like there's so much outthere on that. I would go a little bit against the grain and focus on some ofthe other big topics that resonate with a lot of the other pediatric populationknown in time. We would do more newborn topics so really breast fens dealingnew born topic. We have right now. I have two older boys, we'll talk moreabout that later, probably twenty and twenty four years old, so Minin goes tolot of the teenager and bigger kid problems, and so those resonate with me,but at the end of the day, the tool kits, you know my goals that have fiftyto a hundred of those that cover all the big topics for pediatrics and again,the best experts are brought to one place and they're talking directly toparents and bringing information that I feel like is relevant. The tool kitsare broken up in such a way. You start by talking about the diagnosis, forexample: WHAT IS ASTHMA? How do you diagnose as much had he treat as now?What research is going on with all parents should know care, givers andall that and they're a bunch of little...

...five ten minute videos within a ticketand at the end of each tool kit. The expert provides other resources,websites, articles books, APPs that they recommend that can be useful tothe parent. So that's an involving journey and I would say that's thefocus force right now, but in time I want to add more content. More one pagehigh yield hand outs and a lot of the common pediatric topics which we've ALstarted. curating an we'll put those out later. I want to have morecommunity presence, more per forms for parents to come together with likedinos and connect with one another. I like to have a teller health component,I in their future as well, where parents can come and ask questions andphysicians, nurse practitioners, nurses or even other parents could interactand give feedback and direction, and in another place I see it going is apossible bill. had second opinion connectivity. I think there's a realgap out there in the market of parents being geographically constrained towhere they live as to where they get their second opinions. You know if youlive in the city of Lowell and you get a second opinion for seizures or askfor anything you're likely staying in with this round unless you drive up toCincinnati and Dinapore, but I would like to remove that geographicconstraint and have connectivity with a lot of trusted. Second opinion partnersaround the country where there's male clinic Cleveland or chop or UCLA, orwhat not for children's and parents to readily via tella health, connect tothose folks that I betted and said these are good partners for you andagain I've. Given you easy button, I'm paying d how to connect. So you knowthat's just another example of where I see parent and B being a partner forparents to make it easy when the the it's foggy and hard when you'restruggling with managing your children's illnesses and dinos andcrying disease. So I want to be. There is just a partner to come back and thensomeone- I don't not we'll talk later about around healthcare navigation, butin a tangential way. That's really. What got me excited about parent is. Iwanted another resource there where we could hold the hands of parents, hitthe easy button just make it easier when the world is so stressful. Whenyou have a sick child to begin with, and I don't think we've done, that wills a society there's a lot of good resources out there n e Internet, but Isaw parent and beeping a brand that could maybe package it a little bitbetter. That's Great Yeah! I love the part about the Tela with the secondopinion, because you do sometimes our worlds are big, especially ifyou're in a more more of a larger city or Seconee City like a Louisville orI'm out of Atlanta and in in a lot of ways you feel like yougot a lot of resources, but in a lot of ways, it's small and your community ofdoctors to do that, availability of doctors I mean the demand on healthcare is, as we all know, is huge, and you see a doctor who you might want togo, get a second opinion to and they're not accepting patients anymore rightnow or it's got to be Ria referral. So you know the fact that you could do it.You know, use your easy button analogy and go online and maybe set up atellabs t or something just to get a second opinion on something is I'm surethat would be amazing thing? What is you know? You touched on this a littlebit about the board certified, but I want to come back to this because Ikind of the word I wrote here. My notes is in a sea of this information, whatwhat's trusted and how do you create that environment and parent Mb, wherethey feel it's trusted? I mean I know that there's always going to be bearingopinions and that's within the medical community, that's within parentingcommunity. But how do you get around that? Where those people who come sayyou know what I just feel like. I can take this information and I can I cantrust it. That's a great question and we'vetalked a lot about that with the team and the different doctors. I've pickedto be a part of this venture. You know, trust comes, I think, via a couple different vehicles, onyour expertise and your credentials, you know, being a physician, a boardcertified physician, a place of reputable training, your all yourcredentials. Second, I think it comes in your style of interacting withpeople. Are You empathic? Are you compassionate? Can you be trusted? So Ithink we forget- and we can't just assume that, because these are boreserfice pediatricians or we have these credentials that we are trusted alwaysand that parents will gravitate and want that information and come back formore and feel like it helped them so that that really leads to a part of theapproach. For me, with parent and B, I was really passionate and convicted tomake sure I identify pediatricians who weren't just experts in their field andhad the right credentials and recognize everybody's being top in their filledby their colleagues. But I wanted people who were relatable,compassionate empathic and could communicate withparents and and when I say be practical, I mean be practical. Just like we had aconversation about breastfeeding with one of my colleagues and we reallyhighlighted the balance between breast feeding and when you need to funneled.You know this isn't about. This is the answer. You know our big thing is beingpatient, centric and making sure parents are support and make thedecisions that are best for them, their children and their family, and knowingthat we have some information that may helpe them on that journey. I alwayssaw when I practiced in my office. I...

...saw it being a partnership between meand the parent. I saw it. One is an honor and for them to choose me to betheir pediatrician, but then I saw the great responsible and make sure Itransfer information and helped him make decisions, and then theyultimately always asked. Or what would you do if it was your child, and I realized that was the goalstandard. That's a litmus test by which you practice and sake. You wantphysicians who are genuine and and when they practice as if it was the it were,were their children. Then you know, you've got the right fit and the Nicething most pediatricians think and act. This way. You know I'm dealing with agroup of providers that that's where their heart is, you know and that's howthey relate to people or they would be pearis begin with, but that's veryimportant to us, and so I believe, with the credentials of their training,their expertise and their prowess and Gravitas and her their filled ofexcellence. That couple with the human emanistic side, yeah beingcompassionate and a partner with you to have a patient, centric approach, thenI think you can have trust- and I think it'll take time for us to make surepeople see that and but I do think when they see that they'll spread the wordand they want to us to keep producing more content and be a place that theycan come to yeah well and I'm sure you guys are getting the Saint launched andhow I've been diving into this year. So much of what we buy or consumed todayis based upon feedback reviews. So I m sure, or my man talk about how. How areyou going to collect that sort of information right? You know you don'tgo if you go to a town, you've never been in and you're on help. The firstthing you're looking at are how many stars and how many reviews they talkabout now in Bonin retail buying if they call it the Amazon effect. Youknow nobody buys anything now on Amazon unless it's got. Those are stars andthose reviews, and so, but those take time to build and those take thingsthings like that. So, if you guys have you discussed that is that part of thethe Parendi platform yeah, that's a great point. First of all, my firstcome would be. Is this has been a learning process for me in every way,when you go to medical school, you're not taught the business side and later,as I got more business, I decided to get my Mba and involved in multiplebusiness activities, begin in the space of the Internet and education andconnecting the consumers and packaging away and starting a podcast and doing astudio. Bolo things have been a learning process, so my short answerwould be: We've talked about it. We are not mature in that fashion, yet justfor the group to know we did do, I think I mentioned it. A soft launch inSeptember, where we made the site, live and put it out, so people could atleast start experiencing at getting feedback. We really haven't done. Anymarketing to speak of and January will probably be that time. We do the reallaunch the next couple months, we'll be thinking more about that and gettingfeedback and and making sure we have mechanisms where people can givereviews and give star ratings as such those aren't built in there yet- and Ithink those are the things from me not being an expert in such a field ofusing the Internet, I'm still learning but we'll get there, but now you'reright we've got to have a mechanism, so they can see what other people thinkabout it before they decide to purchase a tol kid yeah. It's just it's funny,because it's just has become such a such a such a dynamic. In terms ofthat's the way we bought that's the way we buy now, it's, it has become calledthe Amazon effect and they are. They are big and they are influencing a lotof things. So it's and it trickles over until almost everything we do today.That's great, so I think you know, obviously the certifications and makingsure you've got the quality of the people there. But I do love that humanaspect of it too, because I do think a lot of times whether and it's not justin pediatrics. I think it's in any primary care or whatever we go to we goto a doctor and they and they can have all the credentials. And but what youhear today in medicine, a lot is, it's. The doctors don't seem to have the time.To really understand me right. I feel like it's how many, how many pits abouthow many patients and how many can get in the hour, and I sat in the room foran hour and a half and then they came in and they gave me ten minutes and Iwas gone and, and I understand the business dynamics that are on thepractices and why they have to do that in insurance. And that's we don't haveenough time to talk about all that. But but the I think, the physicians thatare thriving practices are the ones that are doing that. Where they'rethey're focused on you and they're focused on your needs. Have you guyseven thought about where a physician can a can partner with Paren m d togive them that as well to say here's a resource for you, because I know in ourconversation before this you said, Paren m d at the end of the videos, isgoing to give you more resources. But have you guys thought about that aspectof? It is kind of kind of doctor used parent M D to Say, Hey, you know,here's something go look at and we can talk about this next time or is anotherresource for you. Now it's good question to D. I would actually saythat was one of the reasons that got...

...our focus on the toolkits, even thoughthere's so many things I want to do with the brand. But the tikets to mewere that that vehicle that resource for pediatricians, when you havefifteen minutes with the patient and you just diagnosed the other spirometerthat they have asthma- and you now have two minutes left and you have threemore rooms full of patients and you don't know, what's behind all thosedoors on May say sore throat, it's not always just sore throat, so your timeis crunched, and that was one thing that got me excited about the tool kiss,because I thought man, if I could bring experts together, they could package in.You know multiple five, ten minute videos really an hour and a half ofinformation that if they had every doctor, had the time to spend with there patient, they would give them this hour and a half right, but the truthand matter the business a mess. And you just highlight that's not what canhappen if it could. The doctor would love to, and that's always my statement,the doctor would love to spend more time talking. Educating the onlyproblem is that's what parents need the most of. They need information from youand the doctors are trying to survive and do what they need to take do totake care of the population in their panel for the community, they've chosena serf and they can't worth their twenty four seven. They have to havesome time for themselves to right to a sole to kids, hopefully being somethingthat the doctors would see is a resource because imagine the hand onthe door and like yeah, I've got to go the next tram, but you know what thereis at tookit by an expert Polmont on asthma and between me. Seeing you nextweek and this week you know it's a great resource for you. Go and he'sgonna be able to probably answer both of your questions. It's a standardapproach. They know it's quality and it's from a respective person and itshould be an as soon as an adjunct. So I so want this to be seen as apartnership with Patricians, not just a resource for parents, but a resourcefor Patricians to augment the Education for the patients when they honestlyusually need more than any of us could ever give in the office visit. Yeahyeah, that's great, and I know again we touched on it again, but in terms of asyou're bringing new providers in to this, obviously, is it is it I don'twant to make it say simply, but is it? Is it consistently that they've got theright levels, certification, education, experience and then that empathy pieceof it or that the the good bedside manner? We call it? Are Those reallythe key criteria for the information that you're looking tobring to the site? Yeah. That's a great question for the speakers that we haveleading the tool, kids and we'll be a part of the podcast and helping driveother content yeah. I think you summarized it well, I mean it's aboutthem, having expertise, it's about them having the bedside manner, and it'sabout me also having some connectivity with them via them personally or withanother colleague. That's that's that I trust that says. Hey this person isthis type of person when they practice. So it is very important to me the brandof that person. That's atting table that that's a secret sauce to me. Imean we can have a lot of people talk about a lot of these topics, but whocan connect and relate, and parents feel that they can trust. I think that,hopefully, will be one of the things people look at parent thatdifferentiates us from other. I want say more mechanical information,transfer resources, yeah yeah. I think that is I, like the term secret sauce.I think that's going to be the key for you guys to is your ability to screenthat, because we can look on paper as we do when we hire whether it's aphysician or anybody, we hire in professional business on paper. Theycan look good, but do they fit culturally? DO THEY FIT our mission? Dothey see the purpose and passion and can they connect in the same way thatmeets our standards? So you know, I would add, I would add. One of thething is, I have highlighted- and you point out, Mengo the board certifiedpatricians when I started this journey. That was my focus and it's still afocus, but I've realized in the conversations there's a lot of a to behad by. I believe, Brian Parents, to the conversation on the podcast andhaving parents talked to other parents. So really, I want to bring more parentexperts, because a lot of our topics aren't necessarily medical, a lot moreabout Pareni and in some I have two boys, twenty four and twenty, and thereare a lot of other parents who did things a lot better than me and I canlearn from them and I'd like to share their expertise. But also there arePhDs. They are nurse Practitioners Pas other pediatric experts with greatcredentials to, and I say that, because two of them I brought to the table to apodcast. So one was a PhD in the area of mental behavioral health and he's agreat resource in Louisville. So I brought him in and he has a lot ofexpertise, information and has all the qualifications to, but he's not a bore,serfice patrician, but for his field as a PhD, a great adjunct in partner hadanother young lady who's a PhD and nurse Practiser S, and I should say shehas a doctorate in Er nurse...

...practitioner space, and you know thethe viewpoint in this. What expertise she brings as a nurse practitioner andas a mother is just so invaluable, so I think you'll see parendole to not justbe about more surfice patricians. It's going to be about anybody who is anexpert and brings different skill sets in that empathy and compassion to thetable and a nice thing that it it really points. Another theme for me isthat it takes a team. It takes a village and it's not just about thedoctor and many times the doctor is doing. A very small part of the gencedelivery is real, the rest of the team. So I really want to make sure I embraceall those other caregivers, yeah and really embrace other parents to come tothe table, who can add so much value for other parents and your parent andwas meant by the title of the name to be to show a partnership betweenparents and MDS, and I've made it very heavy on the doctor piece from theclinical content. But I do think in time, you'll see more and more aboutparenting and those other soft points around children's health care thatinvolve parents and other people as well. Yeah Yeah, I know- and personallyI had, that you got introduced to a pomonas and the pulmonology t himself.You know great credentials, you know reasonable bedside manager manner, butnot necessarily warm or empathetic, but what I recognized was every time I wasdealing with one of his N P or PAS. They were they had that in Spain seethey were great with that and and it made the practice balance when you saidit takes a village. I think right, a recognizing where I might be weak orstrong and then augmenting. Those areas with the team is your is is when youactually get you actually kind of get the right formula that that probablytends to work a little bit better. No exactly Odra Rankin who's, the D NPdoctorate nurse Practitian. I was referencing. I've enjoy watching herprogress in her career and she's gaining all his credentials. She alsohas an NBA and she leads a lot of education and teaches with JohnsHopkins and this number of recall places, but I highlighted to her mybigs takeaway, always with work on nurse practitioners is there by farbetter listeners and I believe it's because of their pass and their historyat the bedside and as being a nurse, and they are just better listeners,spend more time and health care. It's kind of key to listen and spend timewith that patient, and so there meantimes. I think nurse Practitionersoutshine the physician colleagues in their connectivity and relationshipwith the patients and, at the end of day how they deliver that health careyeah yeah. No, absolutely it's a great combination when you can get thosepieces to click together, let's jump into something. Obviously, that'scaught on. Probably a lot of listeners minds right now, which is the vaccine, has been approved for fiveto eleven year olds. That has just kind of come out this week and beating beinga pediatrician and knowing that probably getting a lot of questionsfrom parents who have children in that age range and saying. Should I get that,should I get my child vaccinated and and and what are you? What's yourcounsel and thoughts on that? Well, that's! That's. A very big questionwill be kind of gentil in my answers, if that's okay, please e I'll startsome generic statements, you know kind of get my philosophies of care aroundvaccines in general and relate to Covin and then how it's different hatesbetween children and adults and such and you know this has been an evolvingdiscussion. My first of all, I was vaccinated, I believe, in the value ofthe vaccine, and I believe the benefits outweigh an risk and every vaccine hasrisk. I have appreciated the efforts they have taking a slow down andpushing it out to the children, and I highly respect those who are youngadults and females of child baring years and others who are hesitant andyou know weighing the risk and benefits, because obviously the the the risk andbenefits with the vaccine has to do correlates with also your risk, withOvid in different stages of your life and your DIRESPEC or so. Obviouslythose were in the more senior space. The risk is a lot higher and, withother come morbidities and crime disease, your risk of Ovid. You knowthe they're substantial and you really really should strongly consider beingvaccinated. I do feel- and this is going to be counter to some colleagues,that the younger you are, if you have less Comorbidities, you know your riskare less when it comes to coid to the benefits come from, protecting you forthe the off event that you get it and something bad were to happen, but alsothere's a hurt. Community Company helps US decrease the spread in the community. I tend to not be one of those who isabout vaccinating our children for the sake of her community. So I'm not bigon saying. Yes, let's expand the vaccination for the sake of protectingsociety. To me, this comes back to a right for every parent and for thechild and making the best decision for them as individuals for their childtheir family, and that you know they need to weigh the information, the riskand benefits and d decide. If it is the...

...right thing for them to get their childvaccinated- and I respect parents when they decide not to because it's not thejob of parents to vaccinate children, so society is healthier. We need todecide. Is it right for that child? In my opinion, yeah that may be a littlebit conflicting and contrary to other pediatrician collegues? But I'm abeliever in that you know. I have two boys go on yeah. No, sorry! I I justwant to pause there, a second because again I try to really stay away frompolitical here, and I don't want to get politically here. But let me ask youjust a challenge that I've heard to and to what you just said and the peacearound it and was still learning so much about this, and and it will takeyears before we if we even understand all of it, but that I've heard to that is the the whatthey're calling the long haulers syndromes or these post coid problems. Cardiac brain fog. You know all thesedifferent things that come from. It was one of the one of the doctors who Ispoke to on one of the episodes he challenged. That was his challenge. To was to hey, I'm young, I'm healthy, soI'm not going to get the vaccine, because if I get it Odar, it's notgoing to kill me and his his retort to that was I get that and you're probablyright, but we're starting to see such long term issues that stem from this.Like a lime disease, I mean, I know that familiar just from my I had familymembers, who've, gotten it and then have had years down the road thingsthat were related to it. So, just in terms of from that standpoint, do youhave any other thoughts or questions on that? That's a great point, becauseit's not just about the immediate morbidity or likelihood of mortality.It is about the long term play and we have learned more and more. However,we've also seen you know seeing some risk and something effects from thevaccine as well. That's not gone without people being unscathed. Yeah-and you know, statistics are a thing where, when it happens, one in amillion to everybody else, it's one in a million when I happens to you is ahundred percent right, and so so you know you have to as an individual as ayoung adult or as a parent for your children. Think am I good with doingthis. Knowing this is a possibility, it then a game. It is statistics about todo the risk benefits that way the risk. When it comes to vaccines, I don'tbelieve it the benefits far Otway the risk most of the Times. Hence you knowfor myself, my wife and I were vaccinated, but on this point will comeback to the children, parents, men, because it's a great conversation. Iappreciate the question. I have two boys, her twenty four and twenty. Theyboth decided not to be vaccinated and as the bulk of the young people roundthem M, that doesn't help us with heart immunity, but I'm in a place as aparent of making sure, they're, educated,informed and then having to you know, leave them to make the decision theyfeel best. With the themselves, at the end of the day, they both felt likethat was the best decision for them, and I think it was more because attheir age they are in a generation right now, where they're not totallytrusting everything that shared, even if the information stacks up yeah. Thisis this. It's the trust of the data become, then is the trust of the data,and so this has been inward arison conversation. I've had with my boys andthen as a pediatrician and in this space, and then you you, give me thegreat question and which was not a softball question about love it,because this is the heart of how to me everything has to be patient centric.We have to think about the person we have to think about a responsibilitysociety, but I am pretty passionate when it comes to a parent, a child.Only the parent can make the right decision for their child, and I thinkthe children that are five and eleven and the twelve to eighteen that havebeen approved. You know for the vaccines, the benefits are there. Ithink the risk of very loth to vaccine, I think the risk are also very low withthe Cobi can they occur? Yes, they can't, but not to the near to theextent. So I'm happy the option. Is there I'm happy to see how safe itappears to be for children and I'm, I think it's a good and okay decision forparents embrace it and they want to provide the to children. I also lean onthe side that I want to support parents who don't feel comfortable given it totheir children right, and I see it as another tool or tool kid and our toolbox to help society help those who want it and I'm glad that we have it as anoption because there is a p portion of population is definitely at higher riskand they probably need it more than others. And so that's my long answer.No that's. I appreciate that and and thanks for indulging me to push on it,because those those are the things that I hear you know through the podcast andthrough responses with people, and so you know one of the purposes of thepodcast. Our listeners is to just try to give them information that helpsmake decisions and stuff, and- and I agree with you- people, especially in this country, we aregiven the right to choose in h many...

...ways so not mandating anything in onehand or the other when, especially when it comes to our children, let that bethe decision of the parents and let them do it that way. So I appreciatethat feedback there just popped in my head, so in the spirit of just havingconversations, what your thoughts about mandates so now we're taking out of thechildren but more and more the medical systems. I think I read yesterday InterMountain, which is a huge health care system out of Salt Lake City. Utah hasnow just put out there doing the latest to say we're going to mandate thevaccination. So just what you know, I understand you're one person, but, butyou know you're in the medical field, so tag your it. What's your thoughts on.What's your thoughts on that yeah, I know appreciate the question my myfirst com would be going back to the the children's discussion I being askedwearing the head of a pediatrician you my first come. Is that understand that,for me, is a doctor or a Peatra to not totally embrace and say everybody.Every time needs to go. Get vaccinated is not totally popular in the medicalfield or society right now I would suggest, but again this gets back to. Iwould like to think integrity and genuineness and in me sharing my rawview of between me and my children and what I see with other parents and againI think, that's what plays out in parented is. We want to have a balancedpatient, centric approach and make sure people are informed and people madetheir own decisions back to the mandates. Now you know I came from alarge corporate health care system, much like inner mountain and Lee HaValley or any of the or advent, or you know any of these other big systemsaround the country, auctioner all of them bonsecours guy senior they're, allin the same boat of having to make the decision about these mandates. I think,if you're in the health care setting and you're taking care of patience andyou're exposed and you're also having the vulnerable population, I think itmakes a lot of sense that you're in the health care at the tip of the spear toyou know, be vaccinated, be protected. Take all the precaution, so I totallyunderstand respect the mandates in those spaces. I think it's a hard one,because for about a year everybody said the mandates were not going to occurfrom the government level and the employers right. But then, but you knowthat's another thing that's been learning for me in this is theevolutionary process of things morphine ing and we look at the worlddifferently and which teaches me, I don't think in any space and businesshealth care life. We can ever be just absolute today and thinking that's thefuture, because we've got to be willing to change our minds and look at theworld differently and know that we may each see the world differently so themandates have come. I can see their appropriateness in the health carespace. I can be that either appropriates and certain spaces I'll goback. Ten years ago, when I joined the corporate world, we had a discussionaround the table one morning with a bunch of doctors. Leaders for oursystem. Talk about was a flu shot going to be mandated well, that was notmandated before that yeah, but we decided, for the sake of our patientsin the community and our roles at the health care at the bed side and healthcare at the best side that that was probably the right decision. Well, thatwas not a popular decision. We were one of the earlier doctors on that I canthis much to that and that, if you're in the health care field and you'rearound the vulnerable and you're around sick people and you're having peoplewho are taking care of sick people, I think it's smart thing that that's justone of the minimal qualifications you got to have is that you're protectedokay, so an obviously vaccine mandates are not a new thing. A lot of you know:Health Care Space was hepatized, be flu shots or whatnot and kids havingcertain things it had to be in school and for society's sake, polio or whatnot you know, get their attenti and everything being back same. So it's nota new concept. I think in the right place when it comes to mandates outsideof areas such as healthcare. I struggle a little bit with where it seems likeit might not be as important or needed and- and I feel like we may be- causingmore harm to society. So this a conversation was having a lot two boyslast night over barbecue. We were I'll just go there. If it's okay and yeah itis, you know we were talking about the mandate for policemen to be vaccinatedand we're getting ready to run where we already have a shortage of the policeforce and we're already having a you know, problem in certain areas of thecountry with crime and and now we're going to have fewer policemen. Becauseof this you know the question my youns brought up is: Are we causing more harmto society by not having a placement to be able to work because now they'recoming off the workforce? Now we have fewer or or are we really harm insociety? More is some policemen who are not vaccinated? Well, the Anuti. Sorryon that, but I think on that point is you're exactly right and I like theanalogy with police, but it really is also in medical because we're sure sure,as a sure, the shortages of doctors there's short deals of all these sortsof things. So when I'm talking to some C MOS, like yourself they're saying I'mreally wrestling with doing the mandate, because I I can't afford to lose twentypercent of my staff. Well, I think,...

...there's two points there philosoph whenwe talked about this last night, not two boys to the very ones where thereno matter whether at the tip of the spirit, either in the public eye on thestreets or wherever or in the hospital. These are people that were not beingvaccinated. They weren't put themselves to be vulnerable for a long timewithout a shot as an option and they were made to work in an environmentwhere they weren't protected and they were really at risk sure they did thatand now you know, as we have the vaccine option they you know they may not be able to workin that environment. Even though now we have you know higher herd immunityaround the country, not just from the vaccine, but I think we often forgetabout natural immunity, which is a whole other topic yeah. So it's notjust about those been vaccinated, but we've had a lot of people get theillness and we've seen you know a good antibio response. Obviously, as youhave natural immunity, so yeah I'm conflicted in that. To be quite honestin a health care space, the shortage is even all the more. I hate it for folksthat may lose it even though I mean lose their ability to work, even thoughI do understand that it does make sense to make sure we're protecting our mostvulnerable by protecting and vaccinating those who are taking careof them. So I struggle on that and really struggle with those who may losetheir positions outside of health care. I struggle more, though, because I feellike the risk is lower in our society and the heart. Immunity has gotten toplaces where we wanted it to get and- and you know we're having more varianceand even when we have vaccinations, you know it doesn't mean you're, totallyprotected and there's going to be more variance to come and we're seeingvaccine immunity waning. So it doesn't mean, even though right now, that'syour passport to get everywhere, but it doesn't mean that someone's immunitynine months later is much different than someone else who isn't vaccinatedeither. So right it's a hard one yeah, no, it is, and even I'm hearing now the trickle down fromthe government piece is government is now saying: If you're a governmentcontractor, you have to have your employees done it, so the they'retrying to trickle it down even through there and again we could. We couldspend an hour on this and to we'll move on to some fun, some more fun things totalk about, but it it is a bit of a. It is a bit of a bird's nest. I just kindof keeps you know wrapping around and wrapping around and you can keep filingit, and sometimes you just don't land. It is, and it's not alwaysstraightforward, and you really want to listen and appreciate respecteverybody's opinion, this space, because it's not clear cut there are alot of different scenarios and variables to consider yeah for sure sowe're kind of wrapping up coming around the home stretch here talk to me aboutwhat's exciting and new, let's get some positive, let's get some fun stuff inhere and enough of the controversy stuff, but what's fun and new thatyou're, seeing coming out in the world of pediatrics, you know experimentaltrials or coming out now real that you say wow this. This could be a real kindof game, Changer Yeah. So what's new in the film of Pediatrics and then I'mjust going to go into health care at large. If that's, okay, yeah, I feellike pediatrics, it's. I think the space of Tella health is what's blowingup and going to be a big game changer for health care overall and has reallychanged for pediatrics as well Cos Cova taught us to embrace till a health in away that we didn't want to, and we said no, I got to lay my hands on thepatient to give the care needed. Well, there's something we learn in medicalschool that eighty percent in time with a good history. You can make adinosuars percent up to ninety percent time. You make the dinos by alsoexamine the patient. So you know adding the physical exam is a benefit, and somany things and pediatrics you do want to lay hands on the child. But thereare a lot of things that by history, which is what we do at night and on theweekends for children. Telephonically talking to the parents were reallydoing tell the health. We didn't appreciate it for all those years, butyou practiced and took care of patience over the phone talking the parents.Well, now that you've got video, you can see the child and you can talk toparents. I think it decreasing that barrier of access and quicker care isalways better care. I think so. I think telher is probably the most excitingplace to me. That is being more embraced, even though a lot of thenumbers backslid. If you talk to other chief MC losers, a big systems aroundthe country. You know we had a big tall health push when I was at my lastposition for during Ovid- and you know, but a lot of the doctors back slid andgot back and requiring the patients come to the office and practice and howthey did. But there were a few doctors who really really embraced till healthbecause they saw it was a barrier for the patients to come to the office.They saw they come to the office, they might just get sick. They saw that theycould take care of most of where they needed once there knew that patient,specially cron disease via tell health and mental behavioral health. It'stotally what really sit o that the probably the biggest Espartano we hadin health care and still do is round mental behavioral health, but tellhealth is probably best suited for mental behavioral health and the Otheanother part of Messg sure, okay, so I'm...

...so excited about that. I hope that willstart closing the gap. Ironically, in a time when mental behavioral health isescalating and the the needs and the disparities and problems there. So Ithink till health is real exciting on. I think I think we've all experiencedsitting in a waiting room of a doctor that was very crowded and we weresaying to ourselves. I know I have should I be sitting in here. You know Imean I might be exposing myself so worse to more junk just sitting in herewaiting to get in to see the doctor yeah. You know when when people come tothe office and they come for a check up, but they get sick from being there atthe check up. That doesn't make a lot of sense either. The other thing Ithink, is exciting and there's a lot of evolving paradigms. I think in medicine,one of the other exciting things to me is the value of the team and the doctorwork at the top of their license and more nurse Practitioners and physicianassistance being at the table. More lay navigators, healthcare, navigators,nurse navigators and then an entity that I wasn't aware of till s last yearcalled a pierce supporter. So you can have certified Pierce supporters helpwith teenagers young adults anybody and at the end of the day. Sometimes theselay resources can be just as valuable as some of the other more intenseclinical medical. Because a lot of times people need just others to relateto others, to encourage others to have accountability, special crit disease,because a doctor can have fifteen minutes, but if he cannot move that heor she cannot move that needle to get that patient to engage, be educated,take their blood pressure, diabetes, medicine, they're, going to come back,sick or sick, or as sick or sick or next time. But if someone could comealongside him and be a peer supporter or navigator, they can have more impactthan the doctor. Sometimes so, I'm in I'm intrigued in medicine, where we'regoing as a team perspective and getting at the soft side of medicine realize ittakes a village, and patients really have to not only be educated, but theyhave to be encouraged and supported. That emotional, well being is just asimportant to engage a patient to really change your life as getting the rightpill or the right Dan noses right yeah. Well, I appreciate that, and I knowwhen we talked prior, you had said: Do you feel like there's some advancementsin the augmented reality world and talk a little bit at real quickly as we'rekind of wrapping up here about that? And what do you? What are you seeingand how is that a being applied yeah? So I think it's a space that is justgetting going and what the future holds. I don't know, but I think it's probablythe most exciting. I got to hear a lecture fellow by name of David Rose,he's a lecture at Mit and Gur of augmented reality in the world, and hegave a lecture on what augmented reality held in the future for healthcare a couple years ago, and I am getting together after that andcreating a company and and doing some things in the outdoor space. Ironically,and also looking at health care right now and look at some of the crimedisease applications around hit in plants and and obstructive sleep atnawere essentially you from a patient education engagement standpoint. Apatient can hold their phone with the patent that we filed and hold theirphone and take a self of yourself. So with your own face and your bodyhabitats, then interpose information about. What's going on your body in theform of a visual overlay, the D of a disease process, for example, someonehas obstructive sleep Adna, I don't think people realize and appreciatewhat's going on their heart and lungs, and how can pack to you long term whyyou might need sea pap? It's not that you just snore, now you're havingPulinari high pretension you're having right, ventricular hypercube. Thatcould be. I reproduced, I mean you, know irreversible. Then you can havedysrhythmia a fib and such, but if a patient could, with their own facetheir own body habit, is overlay looking their body on their phone andsee, what's going on, see that right side, O the heart getting bigger in thepressures and show what you look like now and then and then hit a button says.This is what my heart will look like in ten years or twenty years and wow. Ithink those could be educational, informative, engaging life, changingfor people in transformation, right, yeah and so and that's only oneapplication of augment reality. I think it has so many other, but I think Ithink we're going to learn so much more. But that's to me one of our excitingspace is really from the work. I've been doing the David in his face and hejust wrote a book called Super Sit. Looking at augmented reality and hand.Packs life and health cares a part of that book, but I think those newtechnologies are just going to revolutionizes. Just like the robotcome into the operating room right, they were to. We see that now it's verystandard and has greatly increased quality of care yeah. You know yeah nowfor sure that's very cool yeah. No, I think my I often talk about my fatherhere and one of his statements. All the time is, I just want to live anothertwenty years to see what it's coming out, because if he's been amazed in hislifetime, all the changes that he's seen- and he just says I just I- justkeep seeing more and more improvements and stuff's coming out. Well, that'sexciting, and I appreciate your time and yourinsights and your candor very excited...

...we'll put on the website a link to toParen M D, well doon or thank you so much Ov, Bein, so much information herewe covered a ton but and as we kind of close out as I always do in mytradition, which is being that we're the heroes of health care podcast. Myquestion to you is growing up or currently, who was or were some of yourheroes. That's a great question there. There are multiple people, we can allpoint to his heroes, but the ones that go. My mind goes to immediately and Iwould want to reference the most were. Probably my parents. I was blessed tohave two awesome God, fearing parents who raised me a house where I was love,nurtured and between my brother and I they less of lie. We could do anythingin the world and that background and them doing whatever it took to meet theneeds we had when we were raised and, being you know, his great parents onthe journey as an adult as well. I just looked to them and appreciate all thatthey have done and they would be my heroes and and then my mind also goesto different patients. I've seen through the years and people that havereally struggled but overcome you know, held issues and, and then those peoplethat are just out there every day on the line, making choices, to defend ourfreedom and to take care of society and making choices that are not alwayspopular to go in those spaces. But there they're putting themselves online, and those to me are the daily heroes that we just really take forgranted. But I love that I love the shout outabout the patients. That's a that's a new one and you and you're right. Youknow those are those are people in very difficult times having to make verydifficult decisions, and sometimes we don't always appreciate that. So Iappreciate that shout out and a fan of the parent as well, because I had twotwo two great ones myself to well, thanks again, so much for being a partof the show, thanks for the information again for our listeners, parent softlaunch September first, so we that's out there and just continue to watch itgrow and as a stronger resource as you guys get into the new year. We wish youthe best of luck with with the product and let's continue to fight the goodfight thankyou to enjoyed it. You've been listening to heroes ofhealth care for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of healthcare. PODCAST T.

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