Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 1 year ago

In a Pandemic, There Are No Small Players in Healthcare

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It’s hard to overstate the magnitude of the current healthcare crisis. It’s even harder to overstate the role the many heroes of healthcare have played in rising to the moment.

But one thing’s for sure: In this pandemic, there are no small players.

In today’s episode, I’m joined by Cory Ferrier, Vice President at Adventist Health, where he — and many others like him — is proving that healthcare heroes can be found in every department in the industry.

What we talked about:

  • Why Cory left a fun basketball career for a meaningful healthcare career
  • COVID-19 proves healthcare heroes aren’t only those providing clinical care
  • The advantages of Adventist Health’s Hospital at Home program

Heroes of Healthcare is hosted by Ted Weyn.
To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

You're listening to heroes of healthcare, the podcast that highlights bold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the heroes of healthcare podcast. I'm your host, Ted Wayne. I'm excited to be joined today by Cory Ferrier, executive over Business Development at adventist health seem valley, California. In Corey's role, he oversees the physician recruitment, hospital strategy, service line expansion and he also works with the Cin, the clinically integrated network, which we're going to spend some time talking about today. He also serves as an instant commander for the hospital's response to the COVID pandemic, which obviously has been taxing the La County area heavily over the last several months. Corey has spent the majority of his career with the adventist health system, which is spanned fourteen years, and prior to joining adventist, Corey worked in the sports industry. It's my pleasure to welcome to the heroes of healthcare podcast Corey Farrier. Welcome, Corey, Hey, thanks so much for having me. Ted Now we're excited to jump into this and hear about all the fun stuff you've been going through and dealing with. Both maybe fun stuff isn't the right word, but interesting times we're living in, for sure. We're learning lots and seeing lots. Before we jump into some of the things that you're doing at adventist, I'd love for you to just share with the listeners a little bit about you, your background, when you come from and how did you end up in healthcare and with adventist. I appreciate the opportunity to be here and you know know, like most people, you don't have a set path. When you leave college, you go and get your business degree and then you're open to a lot of opportunities and I had the privilege of landing and internship and healthcare. My Dad is a self business entrepreneur and my mom worked in health care and it always interested me, so I took the internship and one thing led to another. Been in...

...healthcare for about fifteen years now and I'm currently an executive for a small community hospital in the Los Angeles area called admins health seeme valley. Interestingly enough, we all go through times in our lives were question is what I'm doing, what I really want to be doing for the rest of my life, and I spent the first I would say about eight years and health care and while I and read it, I decided to take a break. One of my friends happened to make the NBA and, Long Story Short, I moved back to Portland, Oregon, from where I'm from, and we ended up rooming together for about three years while he played for the port and trailblazers. Through him I ended up doing a lot of basketball related stuff. I've traveled over the world, I handled some business contracts, Nike Basketball Camps, etc. And I was having a blacks it was coold to such a fear sports person. It was neat to see how forts of port trade in other countries, such as China, outside the US, and then to translate it back into what we see in the NBA product on the floor. And I have some really fun stories from that time. But for the interest of time will focus more on the healthcare piece because maybe some you can tell on the podcast and some you can so we'll keep moving fast. That right. Yeah, yeah, right. But I think the interesting piece for me, as I did that for about three or four years and it was one of my healthcare mentors that reach out to me and he basically said, you know, you belong in healthcare and I want to prove to you why. And so I said, okay, what do I need to do? And he's just like, I signed you up. You're going to volunteer somewhere for me, and he asked me if I have my passport and I said of course it is, like good. So this was in two thousand and ten. He sent me to Haiti and two thousand and ten right after the earthquake. And for those that don't know, population of Haiti and port of prints is ten million and they have three hospitals. So put that in perspective. Los Angeles is population ten million and we have over eighty hospitals, and so you can imagine how overrun they were during their crisis moment. And so I'd signed up. I went down for about two weeks. I ended up staying for over four months.

It was absolutely life changing. And you know, I'm not a clinician, I'm an executive for a hospital, so I'm more on the business strategy side. I work with all of our docks, etc. And sometimes a healthcare not being a clinician, you kind of feel like, man, am I really making a difference? What that experience taught me was that every single person matters and can make it different. And one of the greatest stories that I was able to accomplish during that time was I was able to connect with the American Right Cross and get blood shipped into Haiti for the first time since you're equake, and that took place about six months after the original earthquake. To me, that absolutely saved lives, because trying to get someone to donate blood and a throw a little country is very difficult just due to educational purposes and reasons. And then, on top of that, even if they are willing to donate blood, we can't use it for other disease related reasons. And so saying, because I think Haiti has a very high HIV population, correct not lots of other blood late related diseases. That probably cancels out a lot of the supply. Yeah, and I still remember the first shipment that came into Haiti. It lasted our three hospitals seventeen hours. We had five hundred units shipped from Miami, which was the closest US city, and had it in and we used all of that blood within less than a day and it was just incredible and shows you how big the need was. But that really taught me something, which is my mentor was right. I belong in healthcare and that everyone in health care can make a difference. And so after that venture, came back into the avenues health family and I've never looked back. That's that's great. What a story. Yeah, I mean, you know, it's so funny how we talked about a purpose and how important that is in our lives, and it's it was clear that you, like me, graduate from college, didn't know what you wanted to do. Probably for a while there, with the NBA gigs alt, you like it, fell into a bit of a dream job. But there's a difference between having a fulfillment of purpose versus just having something that's kind of cool, and it's amazing how that can impress you and move and move you into a different direction.

The other thing I love about you is that there's there's no small players right. Everybody is impacting it, and so even from a using your business skills, your negotiating skills and you're just you good common sense, was able to bring the blood into Haiti and and obviously make an impact and do a lot there. I bet you we could probably just do a show just talking about your more about your Haiti experience, I'm sure. Oh Man, anytime. Yeah, so tell me about you got into invent this. I think you've worked through in the system a little bit different locations and most recently you're now at see me valley. Yeah, that's correct. I've actually had the privilege of working for our Portland Hospital, are admins hospital in Bakersfield and then obviously most recently here at Advans Helth Team Valley, which is inventor county on the border of La and I roll, has been on the business development executive side, so I oversee our hospital strategy, our service line expansion. been able to recruit new positions and start new programs here that were unavailable previously, and so it's a lot of fun and I actually kind of relate back to my dad, because my dad's an entrepreneur, so he gets to build things and apply it, just no one tells him what to do. I kind of feel a little bit of that here in my role. That allows me to build program so that patients don't have to commute for their care. I'll tell you the interesting part of my my job, which is not related to busits development in any sense, is I'm also the incident commander for our hospital in the pandemic response. And so, as you can imagine, that's all hands on deck and that takes a lot of it, your time during the week, and it has changed and shifted so much from the initial beginning response to what we had even previously last week. Yeah, so it's funny in our you know, in our conversations, this is this is seemingly been very interesting, this very this dramatic change. You know, things we're seeing in some of the other episodes of the podcast we're having is we are certainly through this pandemic operating at the speed of light, you know, or or some fast pace, whatever that speed is, because what was relevant, you know,...

...two or three weeks ago, has changed and I know you and I chatted before the holidays and you we were both talking about looking at our notes and here we are, you know, about a month later and so much has changed in between. So I think that might be interesting for our listeners. Let's talk about that a little bit in terms of how I have you seen a shift, because, I mean, we all are familiar with March, April, boom surge, getting our arms what is this thing? We don't even know what it is. Now we're getting our arms around it and we get into the fall and you know, surge is kind of coming back up again and you know, December we all thought maybe was starting to flatten, and now thanksgivings ruined everything and everybody's starting to boom again. So if you can just talk a little bit about that, talk a little bit about how that has shifted and how, from week to week and day to day, you guys don't even you know, have to be Nimble. Yeah, well, I think you hit the nail on the head, which is the key word, which is unknown. When this first came rolling through in March of April, it was unknown. We didn't know how it is transmitted between people. We didn't know how many people were actually going to get it in terms of how contagious it was. We didn't know what we had to be prepared for in the hospital sense to be able to take care of these people. Know, what are the things that the challenges that we dealt with right then was logistics, right our supply chain. Everybody wanted an and ninety five mass. You couldn't order one to save your life. And so literally we're telling our frontline staff, by the way, we have a process in place to reprocess your one issued in ninety five mask and so that you can reuse it multiple times. Then goodness we never actually had to do it at that point in time, at least here in the La area, because there wasn't the initial surge that we're seeing right now. But it was amazing to see how quickly everyone mobilized and responded into an unknown. Now, fast forward, we're here, ten months into this pandemic, and the things that I'm dealing with our things I thought I would be dealing with back then, and so now we have more date that the help support the decisions that we're making from a hospital. So you know, before the show we were talking a little bit...

...and you know, I don't I don't want to be grim here, but you know, last week was probably one of the toughest weeks we've had here in Los Angeles. I had more patients admitted to my hospital then my hospital license has so I had more patients than a hundred forty four hospital license beds that I have through the California Department of Public Health. Currently in my county I have every hospital is on ear and I see you diversion and what that means for our listeners is typically diversion is a tool that I have at a hospital to kind of decompress the flow of patients coming in by telling ambulances they need to go to the closest other hospital because I'm too busy right now to take them. What happens when everybody is on diversion is like, basically the ambulance stays at the closest assigned hospital no matter what, and if I am super busy in my ear, they come the line up through the ambulance bay and I start treating those patients in the parking lot, in the ambulance way for hours on end because I physically don't have a room, so I'm sending the doctors and the nurses out there to go take care of them. So it's absolutely incredible. Yeah, you know, it's interesting sad, but what reminds me in one of the key analogy I keep using in these episodes is so many of the things as I'm talking to people remind me of unfortunately wartime things. So when we talk about the mental health of the doctors, you know, though, they rallied in the first surge. It was called the arms they all went out and they also how terrible this was. And then when it was do you want to sign up for a second tour of duty, some of these volunteering doctors were like no, I think I need a break. Right. So, I mean you've seen that dynamic. You've seen the dynamic of the you know, distress, the PTSD, we've talked about on the show. And then you know, when you just talking about this with the ambulances lining up, I just I think again back to the military, or if the television show mash and they used to have the Triaj right, so the all the all the wounded would come in at one time and they had a prioritize them according to severity of the of the wound, but they were all lined up outside the tents before they could move them into the...

...mode mobile surgical unit, right, and that's that was the vision. I have just started talking about what you guys are going through in your ambulance bay. I'll tell you the interesting piece about it is that kind of like I was explaining earlier in the Haiti story is that everyone can make a difference and this one it's just like the normal. What you define healthcare heroes? We usually look at nurses and physicians and those you know saving the lives front lines. In this pandemic, the heroes are spread across the whole spectrum of everybody working in healthcare. From my plant services guy who are creating negative air pressure rooms and rooms that weren't designed for that by reading contractions and working with the HEPPA filter and opening airflow. You have finance guys looking at our more to see how do we get more bodies in here? What contraction can I go to Home Depot and build this thing and so I can store more bodies in our more because we're overflowed at that point in time. You have people who are working in home health who are driving to go pick up supplies. You have leaders in the pharmacy figuring out, Oh man, I have these new vaccinations, which were so hopeful for, by the way, with FIDIS are in Maderna. How do we do a mass vaccin Asian roll out, not just for own em ployson positions, but what's the next step for that? So it's like to me, it's just like you pick any point, any corner of healthcare, and you can find a hero doing work for the first time that we've never faced before as an industry, at least in my lifetime. No, I'm no. I mean I think you're right and I love that you pointed that out. You know, a little bit of a little bit of a teaser. We're having a Brendan car on and Brendan his Adamount Cyani and his story. Same thing. It was great when I started talking to him, saying, well, tell me who the heroes were, and, as you'll hear, he was talking about the engineers, he was talking about I mean, he talked about all the nonclinical heroes who rallied during that time. And this is being supported by exactly what you're talking about in terms of all the hands that have to get you know, everybody's got to come and rally around this situation do it. And I even think you know,...

...as you said, you're in kind of his business development strategic role within the hospital. Yet last week, when everything was breaking loose, it was all hands on deck, right. Yeah, yeah, and I get to Ted. I gotta tell you one thing. I totally forgot to mention. You're just going to be mind blown on this, but we actually had seventy mile an hour wins dusting here and so we obviously are in the state of California. Still we have what's called a public safety power shutoff to where they proactively turn off the power to the grid, which has affected my host multiple times in the past. So picture now. I'm in a psps window where they have the potential to turn off my power. Yet at the same time I have more patients than I've ever dealt with, I have the nooks and crannies and rooms that I didn't even know we're patient to care rooms. And now I have to deal with a power outage. And so, to the benefit of our power company some in California Editors and partners, they proactively worked with me to keep it on as long as they possibly could and they did not proactively turn off our power. We only lost power for about an hour and a half due to actual wind damage. That do you know, there's nothing they could do about that except they got it fixed within that hour and a half. So throw that on top of what we're already dealing with, it's like what more can people throw with us? Right, come up with something else. I'm right. Come on, really, come on, bring it, I can, I can take oh gosh, and again at a curiosity do so in that situation, I assume you guys work off a backup generators. Yeah, absolutely, we have two major generators that can last for about fourteen days. The problem is it doesn't power the entire hospital, right, and so it powers a lot of aspects of a hospital to critical patient care, right. But what when you have more patients? You know what to do with little things that you don't think of, like, Oh man, I got to make sure that the vents plugged into a red plug, because now there's patients in a room that wasn't made price to you. I got to look. How many oars do I have that have backup power? Well, my hospital I only have once. That means I'm canceling every surgery and leaving one open for that emergency trauma that comes in. My radiology equipment, you know, I have to see tea scanners. Well, only one is on for backup power. So there's a lot of little logistical things you have...

...to think of. And the biggest problem for me was food, because my nutritional services. Freezer is not on backup power and we've been trying to work on this to get it fixed. But you can imagine it during a dem prep and not being able to access food for the most patients you've ever had can be a logistical nightmare. And so well and so, speaking of freezers, so let's talk a little bit about the vaccine. So do you have that? How are you guys keeping right? You have to keep it not just a little chill. Do you have to keep it very cold? And how are you guys doing that? And obviously that's a power issue too, right. Yeah, so that is plugged into emergency power. So we are good there. You probably heard this story actually a couple weeks ago about a freezer that went down in northern California. I think it was U Kaia. That was actually our sister hospital. It was an advance health facility where they had noticed the freezer went down and they had to mass distribute all the vaccines before they went bad. And they were able to do that. I mean I can't even imagine how they got that out and Molt and just I think it was like four hours, they were able to distribute over eight hundred vaccines. Really proud of the work that that hospital did. But similar here we're very fortunate we have both fiser and Maderna, which have different storage temperatures that you keep them in. And I'm very proud to say that over eighty percent of my entire workforce is vaccinated, because that's something you hear about in the news. Is like there's some skepticism or some hesitancy. I am really proud of this workforce for choosing, because we made it voluntary, to get the vaccine on their own and we have over eighty percent vaccinated at my hospital. Yeah, that's good a resition, because I did here and I don't remember exactly where and I don't know if they were specific, but they were talking about more pockets of resistance from healthcare workers in the California market just declining to take it. So yeah, that's a whole other dynamic. So so this week has been obviously a crazy one for you. So another thank you for taking the time to come and join us, especially in the middle of the of the chaos. Let's talk about to some of the findings right that you...

...talked about that Adventus is starting to see some of the things that are, I like to call them. Now what's the bright side of Covid? But what are some of the bright side things that you guys are seeing? What have you learned, lessons learn and what do you think are some of the things you guys are king to carry into the future that's, you know, going to make a difference in your healthcare provision? I love this question just because I am a business development executive and you know, my goal is to where are we going to be in the next three years to five years, and I give a lot of recognition to my or own Organization for helping US keep that focused. You know, the pandemic, hopefully, is just right now, and the question is, what lessons are we learning from it and what can we translate to future potential patients and keeping people out of the hospital? I think the two things, just from my own perspective, that I really notice is one, telemedics and adoption. Right like at the beginning, there was very few tele medicine visits prior to covid and then all the sun during covid that number spiked up. We're starting to see it go back down again and I'm trying to figure out and we're with our team to say what can we do to make this either a more consumer friendly and accessible or what are the reasons why people wouldn't potentially use it? And so that's one one of the things. The second piece is, and it's something I'm experiencing now, obviously during the peak of a pandemic, which is what we think is the peak of the pandemic the last couple of weeks. You know, as you have pointed out, the future, you never know. Right now we're kind of in this little wall and I hope we stay continue to go down. But one of the things that we're finding our patients don't want to come to a hospital or see their physician, and that's a catastrophic consequence because they think that by coming here there's a higher likelihood that they'll potentially be exposed to covid and what we're trying to tell our patients is that don't delay in your care. If you need to see a doctor, it's better to see them right now and we have many different methods and capabilities available to do that. And the hard thing for me is how do I better reach out to those consumers? And so add in his health has really been looking at different programs and saying what can I do to bring care closer to where people live and...

...work versus making them come here, because you know, when people delay care we have catastrophic outcomes. You're finding cancer development later and later stages when we have less options to treat their delaying saying, you know, I have a little bit of chess pain, I'm going to see if it goes away in the day or two and by the time they come here it's too late. So for me it's like, if we want to keep our community healthy, what are the lessons we're learning and how can we bring those healthy steps in recommendations and access to our physicians and the place and setting that's more consumer friendly, which is something healthcare is not known for. Yeah, so if you can, let's go a little bit deeper with that, if you can share the some of the examples or, as you said, some of the lessons learned. Yeah, I love that. Let's bring it closer. You know, I know that. I know you're going to share that. That hit home for you personally. It's hit home for me absolutely recently. We can share that too, but let's let's talk about that a little bit in terms of what are some of those things as practical things that the heroes at adventist are doing? Yeah, actually I like to speak about one of the programs because, like you just pointed out, it is personal to me. But one of the mandates from the governor of California and each of our respective states and counties was hospitals have to figure out how, a quick way to expand access at bed capability right because if we get overrun and we don't have physical beds. So the mandate for my county was we had to come up with about twenty five percent or thirty percent more bed expansion in the traditional sense of the word. You and I probably are thinking, okay, physical beds. How do I get thirty more physical beds into an unit so I could take more patients? What I appreciate the foresight of my company and organization was they didn't necessarily say physical beds. They tried to take some of the studies that have shown how much people do not like the hospital environment, how much quality outcomes can be determined based on where somebody gets healthcare, meaning am I agree to recover at home versus a ward at the hospital, and they tried to use some of that to say what if we created a virtual hospital that basically...

...provided the same level of care that you get in an impatient setting, but in the comfort of your home? And I can tell you it was a huge endeavor. I think there's a lot of skeptics at the very beginning of it, but we were able to launch this program within twenty nine days during the pandemic, which essentially expanded my impatient capacity without physically expanding my impatient capacity on campus, without the brick and mortar, you can take on more capacity. That's absolutely correct, and we call it our Adamant Health Hospital at home program which were partnered with medically home. WHO HELPS POWER IT? And then here on, who runs our command center from the technology standpoint and literally what allows us to do for a limited subsection of DRG's? So somebody comes in with pneumonia, gastroenteritis, cellulite, as some of the ease here admissions that we would use that don't require telemonitoring, can actually admit you to your your own home. What's a DRG diagnosis related group? Okay, good, so it's a disease state that basically we classifying code in the hospital side apologize that you. We use so many affrontives and helpers. That's okay, let's say, for catching me right. Well, that's that's what's good about not being too smart. I can ask those questions. So, no, okay. So somebody has one of those Drg they did into a certain classification and so you guys here mark them and say, okay, they qualified for this program correct. Yeah, so what happens is we have a command center that is housed by seven hospitalist. We have a nurse that has been dispatched the work with the patient, the family. I'll tell you, the hardest thing is the concept right and you I'll just jump into my personal story here. You know, helping run a hospital. When my GRANDPA in law comes into the hospital, it's pretty easy to be able to shift them to holding in the ear into a hospital bed. When I'm overrun and I have twenty admissions holding in my ear waiting for a bed to move to the floor, it's pretty hard for me to cut the line for my own GRANDPA, as much as I want to. And so you know, when the nurse looked at his...

...criteria, the like, Hey, I think this is a hospital candidate for the hospital at home program so I reviewed it as like Oh, sure enough. And the other thing that makes this really nice is, as you know, you can't have visitors in the hospital. So as soon as he got admitted, none of my family and his family would be able to visit him. He doesn't speak any English. She speaks a hundred percent FARCI, so communication with the floor is going to be a little difficult. We have to use a translator. It's just not an ideal healing environment for something as simple as just putting on antibiotics and what making sure that he's progressing. For us, the hardest part of this whole process of getting him into the hospital at home was the concept with the family. And so I'm explaining to my own family, Hey, this is what it means. He's getting the same level of service, and the common misconception is like you mean home hell, and I said no, he's getting a cute care, hospital care at home. Let me explain, and then I was able to show and give them a little brochure and pamp and a walk him through that and finally the six brothers all decided. It gave me the blessing to go ahead and move GRANDPA to home. And can I tell you the calls and everything that I got afterwards from the family was just like, first of all, we had no idea this existed. Can he do this next time as opposed to coming into the hospital? And can I tell you how much easier it was for him because he's in a familiar environment, he can speak to the person that lives with him. It takes care of him at home, which is not allowed in my hospital, and he was being monitored seven visited daily by the nurse, by the lab by all the services that he would get in the hospital and had twenty four connection to his hospitalist with video conferencing, with our own technology that we set up. It was just incredible. It is incredible and you know, and you know I you got to believe right and well, it's and it's not even me believe it's happening. The acceleration of all of this is the bright side of covid right depletely. These programs run into bureaucracy and legislation and approvals and, you know, and all of the different compliance things that have to go on. But when the emergency happens and things drop and...

...everybody just you know, then in the those obstacles get removed and mean we see the advances and tell a health this sort of a program. Yeah, I mean there is a bright side that hopefully it is given us an idea of what we can do when we get out of our own way sometimes, which is what it comes down to. And as you said, I mean I relate to it totally for myself. My father, who was on episode, one of the heroes of healthcare podcast, so the regular listeners know of him. Ninety one and right before the Christmas he came down with Covid and, you know, frustration on my side trying to get him help, calling the primary care doctor, who says don't bring him in here, there's nothing we can do. If he gets chronic, take him to the hospital. So I'm trying to man, I'm trying to monitors pulse oxygen, buying a thing at grocery store. I'm asking him what's his fever, I'm trying not to catch it. I'm calling the doctor and saying ten days now he's not gotten better. Primary Care again they say take him to the hospital. So ultimately that's what we did. We took him to the hospital and because of his conditions, they let me into the waiting room with him because he can't see very well, he can hear very well, and I'll try to make a long story short. But in talking to the ear doctor, critical care physician, he says he's borderline. We can treat him for a couple days and he'll go home, he'll be better. So great, especially for somebody of his age. And I'm talking to the doctor about my frustrations and hospital and he says this is what's killing us is the primary care physicians, the home doctors, don't want to take them. And for me I had no other solution, I had no other alternative. I didn't know what else to do. They didn't offer me, to tell, a health visit or anything. So the program, you know, the home program that you just talked about, is just amazing and I'm sure you guys are gonna have to come up with a good plan on how do you how do you educate the consumer market that this is available and how do you ask for it and how do you sign up for it? Because I know my dad didn't want to go to the hospital for ten days because he hates being in the hospital. Right.

So yeah, that's he kept pushing it off for and we had but we but we had no way of getting him better other than that alternative. So that's an amazing that's amazing program. So what are some of the other things? So I guess potentially a Covid, borderline covid patient could qualify for this. And what are some of the what are some of the other things that would qualify for being able to push them into the but I'll call it the at home capacity. Yeah, so just like you would have admission orders to a hospital, you would have admission orders to go into the hospital at home program currently the qualifying diagnosis is that we have in this program we have heart failure, pneumonia, CEOPD, which is product obstructive pulmonary disease, cellulitists asthma, urinary tract infection, gas, raneritis and Covid nineteen, although there are some limitations on covid nineteen. I gave you. They are give you the plasma for crisis or any type of outpatient treatment. We can't quite do that in the home setting yet. We're working towards that, but those are basically the the groupings that we can admit to the hospital at home program here in California. That's great, what an awesome program and I'm sure you guys will be continuing to use that and expand that and, like I said, I'm ledger on the show here. So let's get them let's get the word out that these sorts of things are available. Let's talk about that from a practical standpoint. So let's say a family member is suffering from something and let's say it's not covid you take them to the hospital and we don't know that all hospitals have this yet. I'm sure that maybe there are. Men, let me ask a question. I mean, are you aware? Are the hospitals rolling similar sort of programs out, or is this really just an adventus throughout? Yeah, so right now in California it's Ava his health only to my knowledge. Again, we partner with medically home, who has been rolling this out nationwide over the last several years. And if we are trying to make healthcare more consumer friendly and doing those things, I really see this not as a solution for covid but again something as a solution for the future and...

...trying to get those individuals to get well quicker and be in a healing environment that we know is more conducive. You know you have a reduced risk of falls when you're in a familiar environment. When you come to a hospital, you don't know where the bathroom is, you know it's night. The lights it's a little dimmer your own familiar you may be on medication. All those things contribute to you potentially having a fall risk. When you're in your own home. I mean, I don't know about you, I probably can close my eyes and walk to my rest room without even having to open them. And you know it's just a lot more familiarity, and so we think that will transcend to patients giving healing in a better environment. Yeah, I know you're right and I can remember my one of them Dad's pet peeves of being in the hospital is they'd wake him up at three in the morning to Wayham say. He's all we could be up at three o'clock and they're asking me to stay on the scale. He's like the me that now. So I'm sorry. You tell him I apologize on our behalf. Yeah, so, you know it, but yeah, so, and we get it. You know, sometimes you just got to do while the opportunities there. So yeah, so go back. I guess the question I have. So for a listener if they're in that situation, what should they ask their hospital person? Do you have a home healthcare option for this? Is that the right am I just using the right terminology? I would ask for hospital at home, because that's essentially what it's known for. We start using home health, I think it gets a little confusing. But yeah, but in like they Los Angeles area, you know, if you're within twenty five mile radius of any of our something California hospitals, we can offer that service to you. If from the Central Valley of California, you're twenty five miles with any of our hospitals, we can offer the service to you. And so we're trying to expand beyond our own physical campuses and provide care again closer to where people live and work, in an environment that's more conducive to their healing. So right now our limitations are within twenty five miles of our existing abbits health facilities, which we have over twenty here in California. That's great, great, that's great program I love that. And Yeah, so ask for do you offer a hospital at home? That's good too. That's to know. I know...

I will ask that next time because that would have been amaze. That would have been an amazing solution to the situation. Awesome. So thanks again, cory, for joining us. The stories are great. Keep fighting the good fight. You guys are definitely still in the thick of the storm. They're in the La County area and we're so appreciative of all the heroes at adventist and everything that you guys are doing. I love the clothes the show each time with asking the guest who's your hero. So if you don't mind share with us, who is your hero growing up or currently? Yeah, no, I appreciate the conversation today, Ted, was a pleasure to be able to be on this podcast with you. So my fictional hero is probably on the wall behind me. I have a rocky poster in my office and his life was a onedomillion shot, and so that's kind of the inspiration that I have in my job. But my true inspiration is my dad. My Dad came to this country was able to build his business from scratch and on. We had that entrepreneurial spirit that I still carry today. Even though I work in corporate America and a health care industry. I'm still able to apply the lessons that he taught me and so forth. So that's my hero. That's awesome. We share that, my dad too, so that's great. Well, again, it's been a pleasure to have you on the on the show. I still appreciate you know, it's no doubt that your spirit in your heart and that Entrepreneurial Spirit that your dad, you know, put into you is carrying you far at Adventus and you really, you guys are really making an impact. So thanks for all that you're doing and thanks for being our guest. Appreciate it. Ted. Thank you. You've been listening to heroes of healthcare. For more, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit us at heroes of healthcare podcastcom.

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