Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 7 months ago

In a Pandemic, There Are No Small Players in Healthcare

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It’s hard to overstate the magnitude of the current healthcare crisis. It’s even harder to overstate the role the many heroes of healthcare have played in rising to the moment.

But one thing’s for sure: In this pandemic, there are no small players.

In today’s episode, I’m joined by Cory Ferrier, Vice President at Adventist Health, where he — and many others like him — is proving that healthcare heroes can be found in every department in the industry.

What we talked about:

  • Why Cory left a fun basketball career for a meaningful healthcare career
  • COVID-19 proves healthcare heroes aren’t only those providing clinical care
  • The advantages of Adventist Health’s Hospital at Home program

Heroes of Healthcare is hosted by Ted Weyn.
To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

You Ere listening to heroes ofhealthcare, the podcast that highlights bold selfless professionals in thehealth care industry focused on transforming lives in their communities.Let's get into the show, welcome to the heroes of HealthcarePodcast, I'm your host Ted Wayne. I'm excited to be joined today by CoryFerrier Executive Over Business Development at Adventis, health, SimiValley, California, in Cory's role. He oversees the physician recruitmenthospital strategy, serviceline expansion, and he also works with theCin, the clinically integrated network, which were going to spend some timetalking about today. He also serves as an incident commander for thehospital's response to the COVID pandemic, which obviously has beentaxing the La County area heavily over the last several months. Corius spentthe majority of his career with the adventis health system, which haspanned fourteen years and prior to joining adventist cory worked in thesports industry. It's my pleasure to welcome to the heroes of health care.PODCAST correy Ferrier Welcome, corry. Thank so much for having me Ted. Nowe're excited to jump into this and hear about all the fun stuff you'vebeen going through and dealing with, both maybe fun stuff. Isn't the rightword but interesting times, we're living in for sure, we're, learninglots and seeing lots before we jump into some of the things that you'redoing and adventist I'd love for you to just share wath the listeners a littlebit about you, your background where you come from, and how did you end upin health care and with adventist? I appreciate the opportunityto be hereand you non know like most people, you don't have a set path. When you leavecollege, you go and get your business degree and en you're open to a lot ofopportunities, and I had the privilege of landing an internship and healthcare. My Dad is a selfbusiness entrepreneur and my mom worked inhealth care and it always interested me. So I took the internship and one thingled to another Ben in health care for...

...about fifteen years now, and I'mcurrently an executive for a small community hospital in the Los Angelesarea called Avmens, healt Cmi Valley. Interestingly enough, we all go throughtimes, Winh our lives. Where we question is what I'm doing what Ireally want to be doing for the rest of my life, and I spent the first, I wouldsay about eight years in healthcare and Whili enjet it. I decided to take abreak one of my friends Hapeen to make the MBA and long story short. I moveback to port and Orgon from where I'm from, and we ended up rooming togetherfor about three years why he played for the portant trail blazers through him.I ended up doing a lot of basketball related stuff. I traveled over theworld. I handled some business contracts, Nike Basketball Camps, ETECAand I was having a Blat. It was cooled to such a pure sports person. It wasneat to see how forts or portrayed in other countries such as China outsidethe US and then to translate it back into what we see in the NBA product onthe floor, and I have some really fun stories from that time. But for theinterest of time well focus more on the healthcare piece, because maybe someyou can tell on the podcast and some you can so well keep moving basto yeahright, but I think the interesting piece forme is. I did that for about three or four years, and it was one of my healthcare mentors that reached out to me, and he basically said you know. Youbelong in health care and I want to prove to you why, and so I said, okay,what do I need to do and he's just like I signed you, you up you're, going tovolunteer her somewhere for me, and he asked me if I have my passport- and Isaid of course is like good, so this was in tw, two thousand and ten. Hesent me to Hati and two thousand and ten right after the earthquake and forthose that don't know populaation of Hadian Porta prince is ten million andthey have three hospitals so put that in perspective, Los Angeles ispopulation, ten million and we have over eighty hospitals, and so you canimagine how overrun they were during their crisis moment, and so I signed up.I went down for about two weeks. I ended up staying for over four months.It was absolutely life changing and you...

...know I'm not a clenician, I'm anexecutive for a hospital. So I'm more on the business strategy side. I workwith all of our docks, etc, and sometimes it in healthcare not being aclinician, you kind of feel like man. Am I really making a difference? Whatthat experience taught me was that every single person matters and canmake it different, and one of the greatest stories that I was able toaccomplish during that time was. I was able to connect with the American RightCross and get blood shipped into Hadi for the first time since the earthquake,and that took place about six months after the original earthquake. To methat absolutely save lives, because trying to get someone to donate bloodand a throrwo country is very difficult just due to educational purposes andreasons, and then on top of that, even if they are willing to donate blood. Wecan't use it for other disease related reasons and so San, because I thinkHidi has a very high Hib population, direct, not lots of other blood laterelated diseases that probably cancels out a lot of the supply yeah, and Istill remember the first shitment that came into Hadi. It lasted our threehospitals, seventeen hours. We had five hundred units shipped from Miami, whichwas the closest US city and had it in, and we used all that blood within lessthan a day, and it was just incredible and showed you how big the need was.But that really taught me something which is my mentor was right. I belongin healthcare and that everyone in healthcare can make a difference, andso after that venture came back into the Avens health family and I've neverlooked back. That's that's great. What a story I yeah! I mean you know it's sofunny how we talk about purpose and how important that is in our lives and it's.It was clear that you, like me, graduated from college, didn't knowwhat you wanted to do, probably for a while there with the NBA Gig Sel, youlike it fell into a bit of a dream job, but there's a difference between havinga fulfilment of purpose versus just having something, that's kind of cool,and it's amazing how that can impress you and move and move you intoa different direction. The other thing...

I love about you is that there'sthere's no small players right, everybody is impacting it, and so evenfrom using your business skills, your negotiating skills and you're, just yougood common sense was able to bring the blood into Hadi and and obviously makean impact and do a lot there. I bet you we could probably just do a show. Justtalking about you more about your hating experience, I'm sure Oh man,anytime yeah, so tell me about you got into adventist. I think you workedthrough in the system a little bit in different locations and most recentlyyoure now at Semi Valley, yeah, that's correct. I've actually had theprivilege of working for our Portland Hospital or Aminis Hospital inBakersfield Han th N, obviously, most recently here, an Avans Hew, SteviVALLEYC CIS in Bentur county on the border of La, and I role has been onthe visit development executive side. So I oversee our hospiale strategy.AURT serviceline expansion been able to recruit new posicians and start newprograms here that were unavailable previously, and so it's a lot of funand I actually kind of relate back to my dad because my dad's an entrepreneur,so he gets to build things and apply it. Just no one tells him what to do. Ikind of feel a little bit of that here in Mye role that allows me to build aprogram so that pagens don't have to commute for their care. I'll tell youthe interesting part of my my job, which is not related to businessdevelopment. In any sense, is I'm also the incident commander for our hospitalin the pandemic response, and so, as you can imagine, that's all hands ondeck, and that takes a lot of it your time during the week and it has changedand shifted so much from the initial beginning response to what we had evenpreviously last week, yeah so its funny in our you know. In our conversationsthis is. This has seemingly been very interesting, thisthis, dramatic change.You know things were seeing in some of the other episodes of the podcast werehaving is we are certainly through this pandemic, operating at the speed oflight you know or or some fast pace whatever. That speed is because whatwas relevant, you know two or three...

...weeks ago has chaned, and I know youand I chatted before the holidays and you we were both talking about lookingat our notes- and here we are, you know about a month later, and so much haschanged in between. So I think that might be interesting for our listeners.Let's talk about that a little bit in terms of how have you seen a shift,because I mean we all are familiar with March April boom searge getting ourarms. What is this thing? We don't even know what it is now we're getting ourarms around it and we get into the fall, and you know surge is kind of comingback up again and you know December. We all thought. Maybe E was starting toflatin and no thanksgiving ruined everything and everybody's starting toboom again. So, if you can just talk a little bit about that talk a little bitabout how that has shifted and w from week to week and day today, you guys-don't even you know- have to be Nimble Yeah. Well, I think you hit the nail onthe head, which is the key word. WCH is unknown. When this first came rollingthrough in March of April, it was unknown. We didn't know how it wastransmitted between people. We didn't know how many people were actuallygoing to get it in terms of how contagious it was. We didn't know whatwe had to be prepared for in the hospital sense to be able to take careof these people. So what are the things that the challenges that we dealt withright then? Was Logistics Right, our supply, shame everybody wanted an andninety five mass you could' order, one to save your life and so literallywe're teckling our frontline staff. By the way we have a process in place toreprocess you knor one issued in ninety five mask and so that you can reuse tatmultiple times. Thank goodness, we never actually had to do it at thatpoint in time, at least here in the La area, because there wasn't the initialsurge that we're seeing right now, but it was amazing to see how quicklyeveryone mobilized and responded into an unknown now fast forward, we're hereten months into this pandemic and the things that I'm dealing with are thingsI thought I would be dealing with back then, and so now we have more Datta tohelp support the decisions that we're making from a hospital. So you knowbefore the show we were talking a...

...little bit and you know I don. I don'twant to be grim here, but you know last week was probably one of the toughestweeks we've had here. In Los Angeles, I had more patience admitted to myhospital than my hosital license has Asoso. I had more patients than ahundred a forty four hospital license beds that I have through the CaliforniaDepartment of Public Heall. Currently in my county, I have every hospital ison er and ICU diversion and what that means for our listeners is typicallydiversion is a tool that I have in a hospital to kind of decompress the flowof patients coming in. U, by telling ambulances they need to go to theclosest other hospital, because I'm too busy right now to take them. Whathappens when everybody is on diversion is like, basically, the ambulance staysat the closest assigned hospital, no matter what, and if I am super busy inmy eer, they conon line up through the Ambuonce Bay and I start treating thosepagents in the parking lot in the mmuns play for hours. On end because Iphysically don't have a room, so I'm sending the doctors and the nurses outthere to go, take care of them. So it's absolutely incredible yeah! You knowit's interesting sad, but what reminds me in one of the keyanalogy I keep using in these episodes is so many of the things, as I'mtalking to people remind me of unfortunately wartime things. So whenwe talk about the mental health of the doctors, you know they rallied in thefirst search. It was called the arms they all went out and they alo howterrible this was and then, when it was, do you want to sign up for a secondtour of duty? Some of these volunteery doctors were like. No. I think I need abreak right, so I mean you've seen that dynamic you've seen the dynamic of theyou know, thestress the PTSD we've talked about on the show, and then youknow when you just talking about this with the the ambulanceis lining up. Ijust I think again back to the military or the detell division show Mash andthey used to have the tree og right. So the all the all the wounded would comein at one time and they had to prioritize them according to severityof the of the wound, but they were all...

...lined up outside the tents before theycould move hemen to the MO mobile surgical unit. Right and that's thatwas the vision I have just started talking about what you guys are goingthrough in your ambulance bay. I'll, tell you the interesting peace about itis that kind of, like I was explaining earlier in the Hadi story, is thateveryone can make a difference, and this one it's is like the normal. Whatyou define healthcare heroes, we usually look at nurses and physiciansand those you know, saving the lives front lines in this pandemic. Theheroes are spread across the whole spectrum of everybody, working inhealth care from my plant services guy, who are creating negative air pressurerooms and rooms that weren't designed for that by creating contraptions andworking with the HEPI filter and opening airflow. You have finance guyslooking at our morge to see how do we get more bodies in here? Whatcontraption can I go to home depo and build this thing, and so I can soremore bodies in our more because we're overflowed at that point. In time youhave people who are working in home health who are driving to go pick upsupplies. You have leaders in the pharmacy figuring ing out. Oh Man, Ihave these new vaccinations which were so hopeful for by the way, with fitesor Maderna. How do wee do a mass vaccinattion roll out not just for onemployes of possitions, but what's the next step or that? So it's like to me.It's just like you pick any point any corner of health care and you can finda hero, doing work for the first time that we've never faced before as anindustry, at least in my lifetime. No I'm no! I mean, I think, you're rightand I love that. You pointed that out. You know a a little bit of a little bitof a teaser were having a brandon car on and brandon his at Mount Cyani andhis story same thing. It was great when I started talking to him and Sayi. Welltell me who the heroes were and as you'll hear, he was talking about theengineers he was talking about. I mean he talked about all the nonclinicalheroes who rallied during that time, and this is being supported by exactlywhat you're talking about in terms of all the hands that have to g. You knoweverybody's got to come and rally around this situation. Do It- and Ieven think you know, as you said,...

...you're in kind of this businessdevelopment, strategic role within the hospital. Yet last week when everythingwas breaking loose, it was all hands on deck, right, yeah, yeah and I get toTed. I gotta tell you one thing: I totally forgot to mention you're justgoing to be mindblown on this, but we actually had seventy mile hour winsgusting here, and so we obviously are in the state of California. So we havewhat's called a public safety power shut off to where they proactively turnoff the power to the grid, which has affected my host multipple times in thepast so picture. Now I'm in psps bwindow, where they have the potentialto turn off my power and at the same time I have more patiente that I'veever dealt with Bi, have the noks and and crannies and rooms that I didn'teven know were Patien to care rooms, and now I have to deal t with the poweroutage and so to the benefit of our hower company, Southern CaliforniaEditus in partners. They proactively worked with me to keep it on as long asthey possibly could and they did not proactively turn off our power. We onlylost power for about an hour and a half due to actual win damage that you know,there's nothing. They could do about that except they got it fixed withinthat hour and a half so throw that on top of what we're already dealing withit's like. What more can people throw with us right come up with somethingelse, I'mright come on, brety Mo bring it. I can TICAN Tke, oh gosh, and again a curiosity D. So inthat situation I assume you guys work off, AF, backup generators, yeah.Absolutely we have two major generrators hat. Can last for aboutfourteen days, the problem is it doesn't power the entire hospital right,and so it howers a lot of aspects of a hospital Ta, critical patient CareRight. But what, when you have more patiencs an you know what to do withlittle things that you don't think of. Like Oh man, I got to make sure thedefence pulled into a reten plug, because now there's patients in a roomthat wasn't made price to you. I got TA. Look how many ors do I have that haveback up power? Well, my hospital. I only have once that means I'm cancelingevery surgery and leaving one open heard, O that and heard to see traumathat comes in my radiology equipment. You know I have twoct scanners. Well,only one is on for backup power. So...

...there's a lot of little lagisticalthings you Hav to think of, and the biggest problem for me was food becausemy nutritional services, freezer, is not on backup power and we've beentrying to work on this to get it fixed. But you can imagine during a dincrep innot being able to access food for the most patients. You've ever had can be alogistical nightmare and so yeah well and so speaking of freezers. So let'stalk a little bit about the vaccine. So do you eh? How are you guys keepingright? You have to keep it not just a little chilled. You have to keep itvery cold and how are you guys doing that and obviously that's a power issuetoo right yeah, so that WIS plugged intoto emergency power, so we are goodthere. You probably heard this story actually a couple weeks ago about afreezer that went down in northern California. I think it was Ukaia thatwas actually our sister hospital. It was in Avans Health Facility where theynoticed the freezer went down and they had to mastes trebute all the vaccinesbefore they went bat and they were able to do that. I mean I can't even imaginehow they got that out. Ind multand, just I think it was like four hoursthey were able to distribe over eight hundred backscedes, really proud of thework that that hospital did but similar here we're very fortunate. We have bothpiser in Maderna, which have different storage temperatures that you keep themin, and I'm very proud to say that over eighty percent of my entire workforceis vaccinated, because that's something you hear about in the news is likethere's some skepticism or some hesitancy- I'm really proud of thisworkforce for choosing, because we made it voluntary to get the vaccine ontheir own and we have over eighty percent vaccinated at my hospital yeah.That's good wassisting, because I did hear- and I don' remember exactly where-and I don't know if they were specific, but they were talking about morepockets of resistance from healthcare workers in the California market justdeclining to take it so yeah, that's a whole other dynamic. So so this weekhas been obviously a crazy one for you. So another thank you for taking thetime to come and join us, especially in the middle of the of the chaos. Let'stalk about to some of the findings...

...right that you talked about, thatadventist is starting to see some of the things that are, I like to callthem now. What's the Brigkt side of Covid, but what are some of the brightside, things that you guys are seeing? What have you learned? blessons learn,and what do you think are some of the things you guys are going to carry intothe future? That's you know going to make a difference in your healthcareprovision. I love this question just because I am a usiness developmentexecutive and you know my goal is to whereare we going to be in the nextthree years to five of years, and I give a lot of recognition to my OrownOrganization for helping US keep that FOCUSD. You know the pandemic,hopefully is just right now and the question is: What lessons are welearning from it and what can we translate to future potential patientsand keeping people out of the hospital? I think the two things just fror my ownperspective- that I really noticed is one telametisan adoption right like atthe beginning. There was very few telle medicine visits prior to Covid and thenall of the sudden during covid that number spiked up we're starting to seeit go back down again and I'm trying to figure out and work with our team tosay what can we do to make this either a more consumer friendly and accessiblefor one of the reasons why people wouldn't potentially use it? So that'sone one of the things. The second piece is and it's something I'm experiencingnow. Obviously, during the peak of a pandemic, which is what we think is aPakaf the pandemic, the last couple of weeks. You know, I you have pointed outthe future. You never know right now we're kind of in this low hole, and Ihope we stay and continue to go down, but one of the things that we'refinding our patients don't want to come to a hospital or see their physicianand that's a catastrophic consequence, because they think that by coming here,there's a higer liklihood that they'll potentially be exposed to copid andwhat we're trying to tell our patients is that don't delay in your care? Ifyou need to see a doctor, it's better to see them right now, and we have manydifferent methods and capabilities available to do that, and the hardthing for me is: How do I better reach out to those consumers, and so addaishealth has really been looking at different programs and saying what canI do to bring care closer to where...

...people live and work versus make PekingDem come here, because you know when people delay care, we have catastrophicoutcomes, you're, finding cancer development later and later stages.When we have less options to treat theyre delaying saying you know, I havea little bit of Chesspain, I'm Goingno see if it goes away in a day or two andby the time they come here, it's too late. So for me, it's like if we wantto keep our community healthy. What are the lessons we're learning and how canwe bring those healthlys steps and recommendations and access to ourphysicians in a place and setting that's more consumer friendly, which issomething health care is not known for yeah. So if you can, let's go a littlebit deeper with that. If you can share with us some of the examples or, as yousaid, some of the lessons learned Yo, I love that, let's bring it closer, youknow. I know that I know you're going to share that that hit home for youpersonally, it's it home from me Actan. You recently willwe can share that too.But let's, let's talk about that a little bit in terms of what are some ofthose things, ise practical things that the heroes at adventist are doing yeah.Actually, I like to speak about one of the programs because, like you justpointit out, it is personal to me, but one of the mandates from the governorof California and Egitof, our respective states and counties washospitles, have to figure out how a quick way to expand access a bedcapability right, because if we get overrun and we don't have physical beds,so the mandake for my county was we had to come up with about twenty fivepercent or thirtyty percent more bed expansion in the traditional sense ofthe word you and I probably are thinking okay, physical beds. How do Iget thirty more physical beds into an unit, so I coul take more patients.What I appreciate the foresight of my company and organization was, theydidn't necessarily say physical beds? They tried to take some of the studiesthat have shown how much people do not like the hospital environment. How muchquality outcomes can be determined based on where somebody gets healthcare, meaning am I going to recover at home versus a ward at the hospital andthey tried to use some of that to say what? If we created a virtual hospitalthat basically provides the same level...

...of care that you get in an impatientsetting, but in the comfort of your home- and I can tell you- it was a hugeendeavor- I think, there's a lot of skeptics at the very beginning of it.But we were able to launch this program within twenty nine days during thepandemic, which essentially expanded my impatient capacity without physicallyexpanding my impasian capacity on campus. But without the brick andmortar you can take on more capacity. That's absolutely correct and we callit our ADA help hospital at home program which were partnered withmedically home who helps power it and then heron, who runs our comand centerfrom the technology standpoint and literally what it allows us to do for alimited subsection of drgs. So somebody comes in with Neumonia guesteranaritisCellulitis, some of the easy, her admissions that we would use that don'trequire Telli monitory and actually admit you to your your own home it'.WIT's, a drg diagnosis related group, okay, good! So it's a disease statethat basically, we classipying code in the hospital side apologize a you. Weuse so many acronans and Howoor okay, it's Saye for catching me right! Well,that's! What's good about not being too smart! I can ask those questions so go okay, so somebody has one ofthose Drg. They fit into a certain classification, and so you guys ermarkthem and say: okay, they Qualifi for this program, correct yeah! So whathappens? Is We have a command center that is housed by Twento sevenhospitlist? We have a nurse that has been thispactually work with thepatient of the family. I'll tell you the hardest thing is the concept right.You know I'll just jump into my personal story here you know helpingrun a hospital when my grandpa in law comes into the hospital, it's prettyeasy to be able to shifp them to holding in the Er into a hospital bed.When I'm overrun and I have twenty admissions holding in my er waiting fora bed to move to the floor, it's pretty hard for me to cut the line for my ownGRANDPA as much as I want to, and so you know when the nurse looked at hiscriteriar like hey. I think this is a...

...hospital K, a candidate for thehospital at home program. So I reviewed it. I was like, Oh sure enough, and theother thing that makes us really nice is, as you know, you can't havevisitors in the hospital. So as soon as he got admitted, none of my family andhis family would be able to visit him. He doesn't speak any ENGLASD. Shespeaks a hundred percent farcey, so communication with the fooris going tobe a little difficult. We have to use a transplator, it's just not an idealhealing environment, for something as simple as just putting them onantibiotics and want making sure that he's progressing for us the hardestpart of this whole process of getting him into the hospital at home was theconcept with the family, and so I'm explaining to my own family, Hey. Thisis what it means he's getting the same level of service and commonmisconceptions. Like you mean home hell and I said no he's getting acute carehospital care at home. Let me explain, and then I was able just show and givethem a little bro Shire and Pamplin a walk hem through that and finally, thesix brothers all decided and gave me the blessing to go ahead and movegrandpa to home, and can I tell you the calls and everything that I gotafterwards from the family was just like. First of all, we had no idea thitexisted. Can he do this next time, as opposed to coming into the hospital a d?And I tell you how much easier it was for him because he's in a familiarenvironment, he can speak to the person that lives with him. That takes care ofhim at home, which is not allowed Ti my hospital and he was being monitored, OTwenty for seven visited daily by the nurse by the lab by all the servicesthat he would get in he hospital and had twenty four connection to hishostitalist with video conferencing with our own technology that we set up.It's just incredible. It is incredible, and you know- and you know you got tobelieve right and well et's and it's not even bely it's happening. Theacceleration of all of this is the bright side of covid right deplatelyt.These programs run into buraucracy and legislation and approvals, and you know,and all of the different compliance things that have to go on, but when theemergency happens and things drop and...

...everybody just you know, then in thethose obstacles get removed, I mean we see the advances and tell a health,this sort of a program yeah I mean there is a bright side that hopefullyit has given us an an idea of what we can do when we get out of our own way,sometimes which is what comes down to and, as you said, t Amr. I relate to ittotally for myself, my father, who was on episode one of the heroes ofhealthcare podcast, so the regular listeners know of him. Ninety one andright before the Christmas, he came down with Covid and you knowfrustration on my side trying to get him help, calling the primary caredoctor who says don't bring him in here, there's nothing. We can do if he getschronic, take them to the hospital. So I'm trying to man I'm trying tomonitorhis pulse oxygen, buying a thing at grocery store. I'm asking him.What's his fever, I'm trying not to catch it? I'm calling the doctor andsaying ten days now he's not gotten better primary care. Again, they say,take him to the hospital. So ultimately that's what we did. We took hom to thehospital and because of his conditions, they let me into the waiting room withhim, because he can't see very well. He can' hear very well and I'll try tomake a long story short, but in talking to the Er doc the critical carephysician he says, he's borderline. We canl treat him for a couple days andhe'll go home, he'll be better so green, especially for somebody of his age andI'm talking to the doctor about my frustrations in Hospel, and he saysthis is what's killing us is the primary care physicians, the home.Doctors don't want to take them and for me I had no other solution. I had noother alternative. I didn't know what else to do. They didn't offer me antella health visit or anything so the program you know the home program thatyou just talked about is just amazing and I'm sure you guys are going to haveto come up with a good plan on how do you? How do you educate the consumermarket that this is available? And how do you ask for it and how to you signup for it, because I know my dad didn't want to go to the hospital for ten daysbecause he hates being in the hospital...

...right so yeah, that's what he keptpushing it off for and we had, but we, but we had no way of getting hiembetter other than that alternative. So that's an amaze, that's amazing program.So what are some of the other things? So I guess potentially a covidborderline covid patient could qualify for this and what are some of the? Whatare some of the other things that would qualify for being able to push theminto the but I'll call it the at home capacity yeah. So, just like you wouldhave admission orders to a hospital. You would have admission orders to gointo the hospital at home program, currently the qualifying diagnosisisthat we have in this program. We have heart failure: PNEUMONIA, COPD, whichis chronic constructive, pomenary disease, seolitis asitma urinary trackinfection, gasronoritis and cobid nineteen. Although there are somelimitations on covid nineteen like Theyre Giv you, the applasman of Cresusor any type of outpatient treatment. We can't quite do that in the homesetting,yet we're working towards that. But those are basically the groupings thatwe can admit to the pospitleat home program here in California. That'sgreat what I woal an awesome program and I'm sure you guys will becontinuing to use that and expand that and, like I said, I'm glad you're onthe show here. So let's get them. Let's get the word out that these sorts ofthings are available. Let's talk about that from a practical standpoint, solet's say a family member is suffering from something and, let's t say, is noncovid. You take them to the hospital and we don't know thae all hospitalshave this, yet I'm sure that maybe therre a ML. Let me ask you question Imean: Are you aware ar the hospitals rolling similar sort of programs out,or is this really just an adventae out yeah? So right now in California, itsAIS health? Only to my knowledge again, we partner with medically home who hasbeen rolling this out nationwide over the last several years, and if we weretrying to make healthcare more consumer friendly and doing those things, Ireally see thits not as a solution for Covid but again something IIS, asolution for the future n trying to get...

...those individuals to get well quickerand be in a healing environment that we know is more conducive. You know youhave a reduced risk of falls when you're in a familiar environment. Whenyou come to a hospital, you don't know where the bathroom is. You know it'snight, the lights, it's a little dimmer you'RE NFAMILIAR! You may be onmedication. All those things contribute to you potentially having a fall riskwhen you're in your own home. I mean I don't know about you. I probably canclose my eyes walk to my rest room without even having to open them andit's just a lot more familiaarity, and so we think that will transcend topatients giving healing in a better environment, Yeah Kno you're right- andI can remember my one of Dad's pet peeves of being in the hospital- isthey'd. Wake him up at three in the morning to Wai Hem sa he aw e up at clock and they're,asking me to Spih he's like the Weso, I'm Sorr, you tell mi apologize on ourbehl yeah, so you know it but yeah so, andwe get it you know. Sometimes you just got to do while the opportunities thereso yeah so go back. I guess the question I' have so for a listener. Ifthey're in that situation, what should they ask their hospital person? Do youhave a home healthcare option for this? Is that the right? And I just using theright terminology, I would ask for hospital at home, because that'sessentially what it's known for whe, you start using homehealth Igen. Itgets a little confusing but yeah, but in like the Los Angeges area, you knowif you're within twenty five mile radius of any of our soutern,California, hospitals, we can offer that service to you it from theCenentral Valley of California. Here, twenty five miles with any of ourhospitals, we can offer the service to you and so we're trying to expandbeyond our own physical campuses and provide care again closer to wherepeople live and work in an environment. That's more conducive that they'rehealing! So right now our limitations are within twenty five miles of ourexisting Avis helth facilities, which we have over twenty here in California.That's great great, that's Great Program! I love that and yeah so askfor: Do you offer a hospial at home?...

That's good too! That's Yeo know! Iknow I will ask that next time, because that would have been a maze that wouldhave been an amazing solution to the situation. Awesome. So thanks againcory for joining us. The stories are great. Keep fighting the good fight.You guys are definitely still in the thick of the storm there in the LaCounty area and we so appreciative Bof, all the heroes at adventist andeverything that you guys are doing. I love to close the show each time withasking the guest who's your hero. So if you don't mind share with us who isyour hero growing up or currently yea? No, I appreciate the conversation today.Ted O was a pleasure to be able to be on this podcast with you, so myfictional hero is probably on the wall. Behind me, I have a rocky poster in myoffice and his life was a Onedo million shot d. So that's kind of theinspiration that I have in my job, but my true inspiration is my dad. My Dadcame to this country. H was able to build his business from scratch and Llehad that entrepreneurial spirit that I still carry today. Even though I workin corporate America and Health Carry Industry, I'm still able to apply thelesson that he taught me and so forth. So that's my hero. That's awesome! Weshare that my dad too. So that's great! Well again, it's been a pleasure tohave you on the on the show I sa appreciate. You know it's no doubt thatyour spirit in your heart and than Entrepreneurial Spirit that your dadyou know put into you is carring. You farrd and vent this and you reall, youguys, are really making an impact. So thanks for all that, you're doing andthanks for being our guests, appreciate it Ted. Thank you. You've been listening to heroes ofhealthcare for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of healthcare. Podcastcom.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (27)