Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 8 months ago

Pandemic Innovation: COVID Vaccine, AI, & more

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Have you been hearing rumors about the COVID-19 vaccine? It can be hard to know what source to believe.

It’s time to dispel any misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccination. In this episode, Dr. Eric Eskioğlu, EVP & Chief Medical Officer at Novant Health, does just that.

Plus, he and Ted discuss:

  • The socioeconomic effects of the pandemic
  • The future of AI and other advanced technologies in healthcare
  • Dr. Eskioğlu’s unconventional journey into medicine and his advice for new physicians

Heroes of Healthcare is hosted by Ted Weyn.

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

You Ere listening to heroes ofhealthcare. The podcast that highlights bold selfless professionals in thehealth care industry focused on transforming lives in their communities.Let's get into the show, welcome to the years of health care,podcast Om, your host Ted Wayne, I'm privileged to be joined to day byDoctor Eric Isciaglo doctor Scaglu is the executive ice president and chiefmedical officer, an Avonn health he's a nerno surgeon he's a former Arrow spaceengine hair and he's clearly one of the people on the forefront ofrevolutionizing healthcare, he's leveraging technology and he'.Certainly a shifting paradimes as you'll hear to day doctor skiaglujoined Novon health in two thousand and fifteen as an SBP of neuro sciences,unifying processes and protocols to ensure rorl class experience orpatients across the Novand health system. Before joining Nevan healthdoctor escaglu held several leadership rolls in advancing nouroscience andmedicine and various health care systems before his career and as you'llhear later on. Today, he worked as an aerospace engineer at Allied Signal,aerospace, division and Boeing. He continues to apply his engineeringbackground and efforts to streamline healthcare. Doctor Esciaglu earned hismedical degree from the University of Kansas was a fizer clinical researchscholar Fello at the end of vascular, vascular, neurosurgery fellow for theUniversity of Florida and completed his residency at Vanderbilt UniversityMedical Center. It is certainly our privilege to be joined to day by DoctorEric iskiaglu welcome, Doctor Yo. So much good. Thank you for having me yeah.We're excited. I'm really excited to get into some of the topics that wetalked about today, but before we jump in, if you don't mind o you mind,sharing with our listeners a little bit about your background, I think you havea fascinating background, great heritage, great education. If you couldshare some of that, I know they would love to hear a little bit more aboutyou. Absolutely thanks for allowing me to do that. I'm Ericas teage, I'm aneur Sergon. I am the chief meical officer, an Seke. Vice President, atNovanto we are a six billion dollar multistate integraing healthar systemacross the Carolinas in Virginia we spend sixteen hospitals as well as oversix hundred and fifty chair sites, and wit Ur chair sites. I am at FirstGeneration Immigrants Ut, my family is from Turkey. My parents came here asimigans from Turkey. I am also a former EIREPACE engineer. I worked as an airspace entier for three years before getting thealth care. I've been inhealthcare for over twenty two years now, and I can tell you that what we'refacing right now is historic, but also Im presidented in the Times O'Feremaining healthcare, so glad to be here, yeah. Well and again, weappreciate it as you and I said before we kick this off. We appreciate yourtime in the midst of everything. So not only are we dealing with this majorresurgence of covid but you're also dealing with a vaccination effort aswell. So I'm sure the pressures on the system are great yeah, so is you knowwe all had the first experience in...

April when we have to go into hurry upoffence mode with covid nineteen search, but I can tell you our surgeis aboutfour times higher than what we ever have in e low. This is the biggest onewe've had and it is stressing our healthcare system. It is stressing ourhealthcare providers, physicians or nurses or team members. You know we'rAziliant, Bunchat Novantel and we're trying our best but at the same timewe're trying to get shots into people's arms with the covid nineteen vaccine asquickly as possible, because we know the only way we can end. This pandemicis not only by Conginu to do social, distancing, contunue to wher a mask,wash your hands obsessively, but also getting as many people as we canvaccinate that emonizes with the covid nineteen back seat. So we're doing dualthings right now, dealing with the surge and taking care of our otherpatients. Don't forget! You know the search is part of what we're dealingwith, but we still have ninety five percent of our patients. Our patientsthat have other healthcare needs they're, just as urgent or emerging, sowe're taking care of that. But at the same time we are ruling out ourvaccination, I'm proud to say that Novanta over the last two weeks wevaccinated over eleven thousand of our frontline team members position.Partners- and yesterday was a historic gay, because we started asking ourfirst paces in North Carolina is Novantel, so I'm proud of that andagain, our goal is as soon as the vaccines rarriving to our shelves toget them off the shelves and be able to give it to people great Aman, there'sso many questions coming to me. So one of the things before we jump intolittle more at the vaccine, a d and some of that whate of the questions. Iknow that really hit the healthcare systems hard. The first surge, as yousaid back April May, of t wo thousand and twenty it's hard to say that we'rein wo thousand and twenty one. Now right, I goes fast, but in two thousandand twenty was that all of the surgical areas, all of the non critical thingsgot shut down, which obviously hampered the organizations cash flow, theirrincome pieces in this second flow. How is that changed? Are you guys stilldoing a lot of that work? Are you now doing that? where, in the past you shutit down now you're doing it in parallel yeah? So a couple of things: first ofall, it was less about Cashbo. It was all about taing care of our otherpatients when we shut down everything W, just like the rest of the nation. Forabout sixty weeks to prepare to deal with the first surgeon April, werealize that a lot of our patients stayed away from the hospials, evenemergency pacients gratel patients, weren't calling in ems hartitack,patiens weren't coming toh the newors. We were all afraid and we noticed thatwe start falling behind other routine maintona, such as press momography,colon cancer screen. These are all important things that we need tocontinue doing with the first surge in April. We also learned how to take careof these fiches that much better way. We learned fom the experiences of NewYork City. We learned from the experience of other areas like Seattleand we learned Haw to better take care...

...of them. This time around. We are in abalancing act where we're not only taking care of our covid patients,their in desperate need, but we're still continuing together as much as wecan. We have not turkilled any services yet wer continue to take care of ourother chases other pates that need different medical meens beyond covid.We have a whole bunch of them, so we don't want to. You know neglect thosepacies ignore those pations sure we're trying our best we're having to use allthe resources. We have everything we got as team members, but also having toshift things around in different hospitals. So, for example, you know wehave been cohoarding most of our critical patients been covid. Nineteenat our large prersury hospitals were. Could you to do that? That way? Itallows us to continue to do regular surgeries, regular maintenance, theother urgent cases at our outline facilities that don't have as muchcolis burden. Unfortunately, we're seeing that burden start rising becauseour turhshare hosses are getting foll. Yes- and I guess- and my sense is that,while not fully back some of those people who, in the first wave and hadthere, was a lot of unknown around covid and all are now a little bit morewilling to come back so those patients that you said earlier, the stroke basin.So the cardiac patients are you seeing them? Even in the midst of this newsurge thee, there's a little more willingness to come in and gettreatment. There is, and I think it took a a while for us to convince ourpatiens that our hospials are safe e, the safest in our sentement Novantel.WE HAVE THE SAFEST CLEANING PROTOCOL, sterilizing Puotoclau, so your chanceof getting a covid in Ou hospital is almost no and we hade to comvincethepations, because hat thebig init was all unknown, so we are seeing thepatients coming back. We are Seeng to demand from the patients my biggestconcerns. We seare a huge bunk after Thanksgiving when the families gottogether and we're starting to see a huge bomt after Christmas when thefamilies got together as well yeah- and I don't think we're going to you know,hopefully to me the first one seemed like a hill. Now looking back at thetime, it den seem like that scaling a Small Hill we've had literally threewaves. The first one was in April May. The second one was in June and July,and this one is the clast one, hopefully the final one, but eachsuccessive way I felt like the mountain, was getting steeper and right now Ifeel like we're scaling t e Himalaus, but we are going to be on the othersite, I'm an optimist. We are like scaled at him, alas, we're going to GEu to the other side, and I just need everybody to understand that we need tocontinue maintain social, distancing wearing our mask and obsessively washyour hands during the day and that's how w wudend up beating this. Inaddition to getting our in oculation, we need to be injecting anybody. Theywant anybody that can we can get our hands on with the COVID nineteen backseat well day. Thanks for sharing that message again because it can't be saidenough, we have to be vigilant in those...

...things you know there's so many. Ofcourse, we've made everything political and then there's a political side. Thatsays I don't need to this. Isn't real and you know no doubt this is real. Sopeople like yourself, who are in the front lines fighting this out who aresaying please weare your mask. You know we have to continue to echo thatmessage. So thank you for continuing to support that. So, let's talk about alittle bit. If you don't mind the vaccine right, so that's you knowprobably a lot on people's minds. You guys have been receiving it both fromhim, I'm assuming the FIZER and the Maderna have been coming inlogistically with these cold temperatures that this thing has to bemaintained at how does novand handling that yeah. So we actually were. Youknow we kind of saw what was coming down ther back in August, so weactually secured. We got ran new for deep freezers, thetare very largeindustrial freezers, minusseventy, and we have the capacity store up to sevenhundred a fiftyhsand vaxes at any. Given time wow we have ta capacity. Weplannd for this. I culd tell you this backsa roll out is logistically,probably the most complicated, most difficult, I've ever seen in mylifetime, but our teams have done a great job at norontel. Yes, we aregetting both fiser biontvaccine, as well as the MODERNA vaccine, becausetheir messenger are NA. They are fragile vaccines, so we need to keeprat mineus seventy and we need to deover them pretty quickly as soon aswe taw them, you can't put them back into refrigerior freezer that doesn'twork, but our teaps have done a phenomenal job, both from the nursingside with our cheek nursing officer, as well as from the pharmacy side, withour chief pharmacy executive. We've really operation lines his in anincredible way: Ha we've gotten to a place where we have vaccination fightsin our hospitals for our team members. Now we just role at vaccinations, liteand our cities, large cities to be able to vaccinate people, and also we haveput on a Health Equity Lens, because we want to make sure that we get to thepopulation that' misprofortionally affected with covid nineteen. We wantto make sure that they get the vaccinationthe one part that ISS mepauses, even in the healthcare workers across the nation. There's about aforty percent hesitancy to get the vaccine, and that really gives me pause.You know I've heard people saying this peccy process was rush. How can you geta vaccine done in four to six months when it used to take two to three years?There's a lot of misinformation on fortunme social media is not helping usat all lots of misinformation out there. What I want to tell you is when my turncame up. I took the vaccine. I trust the science and you know I want to telleverybody when you get a shot, don't pass it up, take your shop and you knowI would encourage you rat to think about this very carefully. The sizebeside behind the vaccine has been in the Makin for ten years. Yeah want totale yeah. Let's go. Let's talk about that, because I think that's thecritical piece for me that you know. As you said, people are concerned thatthis was a rush to medicine when it's really not the foundation of this hasbeen under development for many many years yeah, it's been going on t forten years and luckily it came Thouh a...

...poition. Just about the same time,covid nineteen was hitting our communities around the world in the USA,and so this messanger f any technology was, though initially were our bodiesto be able to fight cancer, and I think H, that offers a lot of promise, but wewere able to quickly pivot for Vaccine Devil, and so I want people tounderstand that, even though the vaccine process may have seen fastergoing forward, this is probably going to be the nort any kind of differentviruses. Choo viruses, anything we get that may be new. The Way WWe govaccenes is probably O to be much shorter than what we had seen in thepast ten fifteen twenty years ago. So I just want people to understand thatyeah. No, I think, that's, I think, that's key and I think the other thingthat was interesting too I'd love you to share with the listeners is how youfeel that this could have a big impact in the future on HIV and cancer,because the two lead doctors on this were actually oncologists, which Ididn't know because they were developing this technology, as you saidfor over the last ten years, to really affect cancer yeah, the wife andhusband team. That Tepe is the scientist Theyre actually on collegessaid Dr Shahin and Dactor Crag and their Germans. The turcister wasTurkish like me, and you know they do offfice for cancer. What they wanted todo. As, though, of that way, you can replicate that cancer self fortionofbecase so'm, not the entire cancer stuff, you don't want to make it activea portion of it that your body Recognizeis forn using the antigens andyour body will attack theuselvs. Now when we talk about evenology Wen, wetalk about, you know our body's own dependse. We always think aboutdefenses outwards, but our body during any given time also thos internalsurveylance. It takes out bad self, it destroys them before they become aproblem chance yourself at the ones that escape that surveyloce, and whatthis Hosban and Wy Sciettis team was trying to do as they're trying to buildup a system where your body recognizes anything, that's not right inside yourbody. I believe this is going to open up a lot of bors for cancer pever. Ican tell you that the way we deal with cancer in the next five years is goingto be very different. We're already doing a lot of that with Carti perponplace going to accelerate. I'm also very hopeful that you know there'sanother virus. We have't been able to conquer for the last thirty five years.It's called HIV and I'm also there hopeful that this is going to open thedoors. Once we get a hold of this pandem, you can stop and intracks forcovid nineteen. We will find a vaccination for HIV as long so ashopeless as things look right now- and there is a you know- civeil lining.There is a lot of hope on the horizon. There's a light at the end of thetunnel and I think we're going to come out of it much stronger as thehealthcare system. That's great. No, it is definitely very exciting, lookingforward to seeing how t a how that plays out. So, let's also talk aboutthe long term effects of COVID. I know you've mentioned to me about some ofthe mental health aspects and some of the things we've seen that came out ofthe two thousand and eight economic...

...issue, but now we're dealing with awhole new different issue. Talk to me a little bit about what some of you think.Some of the long term effects may be on the mental health side yeah absolutelyso, if we look at the two thousand, an six to two thousand and eight financialcrisis, and when we look at the you know the amount of mental health issuesthat cause our population or apative es and our mental health issues went up byabout thirty five to forty percent, and that was a huge bomb tey. Unfortunately,covid nineteen is going to be proved to be even worse, tin. My estimation, youknow we have a lot of our fellow countrymen losing their jobs, losingtheir pones not being able to provide for their families, and that isstarting to increase a lot of opog addiction and that's also going tostart to increase a lot of the you know subsessivenes besides o peoids, butalso mental health issue, depression, sucide res, that's all going to be onthe rise, and even if we were able to get a hold up, covid nineteen say inthe next six months. The tail effect of that will probably last at least two tothree years, so the social effect is going to linger for a while,unfortunately, and so we are really focused on how do we take care of thoseafter effects of covid nineteen, you know we're working on the art of a showintelligence side. We have a huge artificurin houses cush in our healthcaroganization. We believe that is the next. You know wave in healthcare.That's going to make us more efficient, more effective, bless, costly, so we'relooking at ways of not only helping patients with the virtual. You Know Barof health possible concept, but also identifying team members or identifyingemployees that might be susceptible to Unin to depression or substance amusebefore they get into that and helping them out proactive if they want to behelp corractive, we don't have enough before covid nineteen, our favoralhealth in this country was on crutches to begin with, so you know, we have tocome up with intovative ways, because we don't have more psychiatrists. Wehave to coin compay of ways how we wing solve this problem once it shows up onour doorstep, so covid nineteen is obviously horrible, but there's goingto be a lot of other things that come along with this, that we have to dealwith. One of the other things we're seeing is a lot of mental healtheffects on people who have TAT Coei Nineteen, about thirty to forty percentof the people. You know they lose smell, they lose paste, but besides thatthey're having mentall issues afterwards we're seeing Reno issues,kivme issues afterwards we're seeing long issues their longs, don't returnback to normal, where their lung function should be. So will we dealingwith a lot of the different effects of covid nineteen many years after we'veconquered this cot of for pandemic and so we're pivoting towards that R? Also,looking to the future, what do we need to do to keep our patients healthy andhow can we help them in that aspect? Now I think that's great, and you knowyou answered one of the things which was you know obviously, and thebehavioral health is not rich with...

...providers right. It's already resource,strapped and there's just not enough psychiatrist and psychologist to goaround so can give us a little bit of a idea of how ai, how what are you guys,seeing or an example of one of the ways that you might be able to leverage aior some of the things that the system is doing that will help you be able tobring more services with honestly less people yeah. So we have started a Ijourney way before covid nineteen. Fortunately, for us we have a very gooddata, aalytics team. We have an incredible technology team, our chieftransformation and technology officeserious phenomenal. So we workwith them very closely. We had started that journey initially, with our strokefishes. We started using a system called Isai with our stroke patientswhere the artificial intellgence tdetect the stroke of the patient,while they're in the cat scanand without them being able to leave thecat scanner. So we cut that step and we're able to not only detect thestroke even before the patient leaves the cat scandar using machine learningartificiullintillges. But that alert goes on your smart Mane. You know mostof my providers most of the Positians are Malal Generation. They havesmartpoons, whether it be apple for Sam Song Galaxy and what they have beenable to do. Is they get that alert on their smartpoons and they can look itup anywhere anytime and they can activate the whole team from the smartMing, whether it be the r physician, whether it be Te Orr stat, whether itbe e, neuragist Whel. I be thepharmacist just think about the oldways we did stroke in this country has been, and they still we ter stillplaces how they do this. This way, patie comes into the AR ith. A strokealert gets taken back to the cat, scander Chastan gets done. You get astat reading from rediology, which, in the best of times, takes fifteenminutes. Sometimes it can take even more right and the adiootions up.Calling the ER physician saying, there's a stroke, ter physician hangsup the phone. Has the secretary call the neuroogist on call say he needs tocome down and look at it. An neurajust looks at it. Then he will have to callthe nurse surgeon or Invession yourinotist to activate the team. Justthink about the steps you lost yeah and every second of a stroke. You loseabout thirty two HOUSAND BRASEP, so we've been able to shave an we were oneof the best in the country as far as how quickly we could give theclockbusting drugs to our patient or about thirty nine minutes, and theNational Stan is about sixty minutes within sixty minutes of strove, we'vebeen able to shave it down to twenty nine minutes. That's ten! MORE MINUTES!That's about ninetee million, more braceoff on average perpation, yeahWellso Akin you cut it in more than half yeah you, so you! This is one ofthose things that you really not only improve thecoms, but you also maximizethe fficiency or what you're doing- and I guess this is my Air Smith enjuyingbackground coming here to play, and I...

...like Processis, very efficient andprocess that are finally juned an you keep getting it better. I mean onceinstead of process. It doesn't stay that way that we're making this evenbetter. You know collaborating with the company trying to make this processeven more smooth and much more fast on, but this is the one of the examples ofai that would be using another example of Ai that weld be using. Is You knowhelping our patients say out of the hospital woilh heart fail? We canpredict, he can come into the heart failure and who we end up in thehospital. You know we want to make sure that they're taking care of in theirown home embimis. They don't need to come to the hospital fall Ong of thisstuff and so we're predicting which patience and were paying attention tothose patients. The one thing IV neglented to mention you know a I to meseems like it's going to be the great equalizer for all populations forhealthcare equity and when you look at stroke care it doesn't matter. If thepatient is an uptown Charlotte or there in rural Alcan North Carolina, they getthe same care with Cola neurology and with artifician a Goo same on ouramount of attention, same details, same protocols and we're trying to do thisfor allour disease processes, because you know I want to be able to provideall our patients the same utmost care, regardless of their entry point intoour system. Yeah, that's great right, because the AI doesn't see the biasesand not that a I can't get biased it can hearn to Bya seand. You have toalways be tweeking that, but the AI doesn't see the same emotional, socio,economica, typical human brises y. He thank you, human byhicis that all of usjust tend to do so yeah. Well, that's! That's amazing: That's great talk alittle bit more about you have an interesting. You know your backgroundin.You know your engineering background. You started off, obviously with schooland Engineering and ended up in medicine, but talk a little bit moreabout how you see that playout, obviously in terms of process andefficiencies, but how has it helped you when you're in you're not only aurpracticing of medicine, but now in you, R, your administrating, you know yourrole as as an administration arm an executive arm of the hospital yeah. Youknow. I look at healthcare very differently because of my engineeringbackground, and you know I actually practicdas an engineer for three years,so I didn't just go tho school, I gradual, fomers, theris ONA worked asan Aro space engineer to work with different plan manufactures and had agreat time, but during that time what I realized is. This was in the late S,earlys I'm kind of dating mysoff yere. But what I realized is they had gottentheir stuff together. They knew how to maximize the processes and MAKEHIMGefficient and really zero tolerance, almost zero tolerance or any kind ofAiror, and I tried to bring the same Mentaut of their health here. You knowwhen I first started: Healthyare anmandawo by trained of Andermot as anurser o resident. You know it started and tenabots a fantastic inticution,probably one of the best in the country, but healthy in general, start on me howfar behind it was technology wise...

...compared to any other industry. We goare andmin. My estimation were about ten to fifteen years behind otherindustries and in getting technologies and advanced. You know fo moduls in toHel here the one thing that I have seen that really helped us oun is covid.Nineteen, I I know everything unfortunately comes back to Covinnineteen, but the silver lining has been it's really excaried ortechnological advances. I'll give y the example of our position before Ovidnineteen we're doing about hundred and fifty televisiots a day. You know, andyou talk about six hundred and fifty care sites with over. You know Ounineee hundred positions hundred an fifty two seems like a liwte number.Once we hit the pandemic, we had no choice right. Everything had to setdown the only way to interact with your patient was through Tela Medicine andto the credit of it partners, weare able to rise that up pretty quickly atthe height of the Panamin, we're doing about seventhousand visits a day, justthink Bou hundred and fifty two hundred and fifty to seven tousand o thosenumbers have, and I told people those numbers are going to go down butthey're going to Platto, and it has it's about twenty five hundredtelevisiot today and there's that certain segment of the population thatincludes my wife, who makes all the health care decisions for us in in thehousehold, including my kids. You know they have gotten used to tell emedicine they feel like. This is a good venue for me to access hot cere. Yes,that's, never coming back and so yo in a good way. Covin Ninteen has been thegreat excelerator for us to be able to move into these technologies that mayhave taken year. Sports to get into the other thing I have seen is you knowwith competors we become almost overnights collaboraters for covidnineteen, because again we're in friendly competition with couple ofsystems in our areas that we serve. But what happened is we got together assystems and we really want to do what's best for our communities realize thatthis is our commuiting not ther to me, not my commenity, our community, and westarted really it's amazing to see how competers can come together and youknow, work for the best of the community in the worst Bot plines. Sothat gave me a lot of Hobras Wal. That's great! So tell me when you wereworking aro space and you were being an engineer. What made you pivot andchange your mind or decide that you wanted to get into medicine, there's afair amount of difference. There yea is so I actually used to be responsiblefor the I used to work on a team where we looked at the interface of the boing,seven, seven, seven aircraft wing with the get engine, so it was a fantasticproject, really loved it. I started actually volunteing at a children's sofcool over the weekends and I start rounding with it. Pediatric attentattendans. They were really kind to take me in, and volunteering theirejust trying to help families n. At that point I realize that you knoweverything they did was a different probly. Every problem was unique, likeyour fingerpint and not to patient, was...

...alike, and a fascinated me now you haveto understand my dad was a pediatrician. He was an the anathologist. He was enokay to helping save kids lives. I never want to be a doctor. I'm a veryanalytical person, I'm a very math based person. So all I want to do iswork on PLAC, because I was fascinated with space and planes. Ever since I wasa young age beyond the usual child's fascination. I still am. I know we'vetalked about that Yeph. So when I starte seeing the positions and theytackle each problem and each polem was a unique problem where you culd have anenfect on somebody's life. That's what changed! Not It wasnat an overnightswitch. It wasn't like. I went there twice and I felt like Oh my God. I gotto change my life right. It took about a year of me, volunteering and at onepoint I realized I really love what they do. I want to make a difference inpeople's lives. I felt like I was making a differences, an engineer inpeople's lives, making it better and more technologically advanced, but Ifelt like I want to get in a deeper way and g be able to make a difference inpeoples fine, so I quit my job. I remember my supervisor at the timethought I was joking because I had a pretty you know bright career and Iwent back at the tender age of twenty five back to biology, one O on, becauseI'd never taken biologis nd, I'm on and dissecting prods with eighteen yearolds, daing, one Yoar, Premad and, of course gone to medical school and therest of his history. The best part in my medical school. I did get selectedto reay prestigious program that was on the startup phase, called Ni, CoaResearch, Star Scholars Program that, interestingly, it was sponsored byfiser. Okay, so I have that fiser connection in Charlie Sanders, who wasthere Amer to Co, was one of my mentors there, so it was interesting justdealing with that, and you know I had a fantastic comment and Ih. I spent twoyears there doing Coco Research, translation, research and that's wheremy lovefor research came in and all this advancemengent technologies cameit and so tell Imov with that. So it's it's clear to me. Younew Novant and asI've been following some of the things that you the post on Linkin and stuff.I always find it fascinating in terms of they're really trying to continue tobe part of the leading edge. What are some of the other things covid or noncovid that you see coming out of the system that gets. You excited that youreally think you guys are really on the forefront and cutting edge and creatingsome really good new opportunities in healthcare yeah. I think the biggestthing for us is really trying to provide equity to healthcare toeverybody that comes in and we're using any kind of egmastic knowledges,including machine learning, artificial intelligence. The next. The other thingthat we're really excited is the zipline done where we hope to be ableto start delivering medication for patients with a drone, so they don'thave to go out of their house pick up medications, especially people are themost wunerable. During the pandemic, we did get an FA waver to be able to do ondemand delivery of our tpnes to our...

...hosscals with Zipine. That was a goodexperiment for us. That was a good dry. Runer Shit wasn't writeren. We actuallydid provide around PP, but my next hope is that you know the next big cush forour organization and you now. This is led by U Co Caromato and our board isreally to be not on the not just on the leading edge but being in the front ofeverybody else. As far as offering the artificial intelligence and theenasticknowledgees anything that's going to make health care more efficient,effective and more precise precision, medicine, but also by doing that, atthe same time, you reduce the cocal variations where you make it lessexpensive. It's just because you pay too much through. It doesn't mean thatI's a good product and we've seen that with other products beside healthcaresure. So our goal is to make it so precise and so finally tuned for eachindividual patient, because every one of us is like our fingerpint. We haveunique problems and none to disease is the same kind. o Find Tunit, make aprecise, fer ebucation, but the same time lure the cost using all thesefantastic advancements and technologe. That's awesome, that's great! You know,and what, as we're starting to wrap up here, one of the other things I hadfrom my notes that we had talked about in Ur an our first discussion was avirtual hospital model, and you talked about being very excited about that.Can you you share a little bit more about that yeah? Absolutely so. I'vebeen fascinated. Of course. This came about my thought process about space.I'm fascinated bon space and, of course, during this covid panemic, a lot of thespace launches, weve had kind of went delive unnoticed. If we didn't havecode, I think itwould be front page news. Every day you know it's. A spacesex shutte launch is almost gone every week now right routine, and you know inthe next three to five years. I ventured to guess that we'd becolonizing. The moon and- and we are at a you- know, race with Chinese and theRussians, be able to colonize an there's Wi be a lot of discoveriesthere, but from all that thout, I start thinking wel when we con Hize the moon.How are these hundred two hundred people going to get their health care?You know w how Wus it to do that. So it came from an idea where, whatever wecan do on moon, we could directly apply it to good all dirk here and one of theareas. I think we've seen, unfortunately, a dramatic closure ofour nural hospital system. So we have a lot of possible deserts in this country.Right now, because Youo postls are not able to sustain themselves nd, I feellike the Rurale of hospitals can be supported not only by these advancedtechnologies, so we're doing like Missai we're trying to keep thepatients in their own hossals, rather than bring him aff to the bigmothership in the titiay hospital that will help them both financially alsocomically, but where there is no loral hospital, we should be able to Pu offerthes virtual hospital model, where patient literally will walk in whetherbr or AR, and be able to feel that theyre in a setting and be able tointeract with people a virtue. And by...

...doing that, I think we can help a hugeamount of population that you can't do. Virtual Heart surgory. You can't dovirtual brain surgery shors a those are very futuristic. But if you think aboutthe things we're doing today- and you know, I want your listeen to leave thispodcast understanding. That today is probably going to be the slowest changeof pace you're going to see in your entire life from this day on every day,the change of Paceo going see, especially in medicine, is going to beexcited and getting larger and Marger an Marger. So you know a lot of thesethings that we thought ten years ago could not be done. We're doing it. NowI mean when I was training. We couldn't you no for brain andieurs, an the onlyWaye we could do. That was by opening up the skull and going to the brain andclipping the anners, and now we can do eighty percent of them with what I callBandad Surgon we go through the groind go through the FEMRAL Arti go up to thebrain, while the patients sleeping take care of that aniers of come out.sofficient leaves home the next day, an esilly things that were unthinkablefifteen twenty years ago and how we're doin all of this stuff, so the futureof medicines very exciting, and I urge people to think how they can contributeincosing one of the things. I also urge medical students to think about is thefuture position is not going to be only a position. WHOs excellent comical,diagnose as Ben Comical skills, but also who is, has some data signscomponent to their train and what I mean by that is understand som thepython training understands on the data science because they are going to beable to want me the ones that utilize this fantastic. You know technology tobe able to be better. Doctors, Hey i's not going to replace positions, but AIwill replace position to resist them. Position to use AI are going to replacethysician to resist Aa. So I can tell you that for sure right got embraced tochange, because it's coming, whether you like it or not. It's here, it'salready pier well and what I love, and I love about your positivity and Youre.You know in the face of the disasters rrevolvin in the hardship that we'redealing with you continue to see the positive part of it. So I appreciatethat- and thank you for that. I also love the fact that you're you'rebasically validating that because of the positive coming out of the pandemicis going to be an acceleration in medicine and technology. There's goingto be advancements, I think the telle medicine thing is just even a perfectexample how the regulatory things were standing in the way of a growing telamedicine. Due to the pandemic, we had to get throw those things away andthey're not going to come back because we're seeing all the benefit in thevalue of the thing. So there are right things that come out of the pot of thedisaster as well. So I love that love that about you. I Love Your Spirit.Thank you for being a frontline hero as we' like to talk about it here as HelthCare, you guys are, you know, doing super human things. We typically as Imentiond you close these segments with our heros on health care, and I love toask you the question when you think about it. Who is your hero? My hero isnot a healthcare hero, it is actually professor, Edward Deming and the reasonI fell in love with them. As an...

...engineer was professor deming was thegentleman that went to. He was a professor. He was a systems engineerand he went to Japan after World War Two and really made them what they were.As an industrial powerhouse K, inspired people to believe that every one of youcan improve your organization, regardess of whoevel, you are, and somepeople call total quality management. Some organizition called confusedquality improvement, but he gave the notion concept of you. Have YourDestinyin? Your own hands isn't need to do jo person at the organization. Youcan't contibute at your level regardedg to wheer. You are so he is my hero,Professor Edward Deming yeand. I think I think if I remember the Japanese callthat Kaizen Kaisen Yep. It is guys en and a lot of our technologya lone ofour companies in the lates adopted those methodologies. I was actually onthe receiving. Well, that's I'm dating myself to that's how that's how I knowKaisen, because I'm old too yea and that's when I started getting into it.I love it. I mean that's, I think, and again, to the possibility of empoweringyour own employees to improve things without waiting for somebody fromhigher up to tell them take control of it. Amazing! Well, Dr. Thank you somuch for joining us. It's our pleasure to have you on the heroes of healthcare.podcast continued success, keep trail blazing keep finding new ways to dothis. I love the hope that you bring to us the confidence in the vaccine. Keepwearing masks, keep being vigilant. Let's keep that message going and wejust continue to thank you for your service and wish you all the best andyou continued success as you move forward. Thank you. So much and again Iwant to leave by saying when you get a shop to take your don't pass it up.Amazing. Thank you. Thank you. So Much Thad you've been listening to heroes ofhealthcare for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of healthcare. Podcastcom.

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