Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 4 months ago

Focusing on Positivity & Optimism in Challenging Times

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Medical staff have been put through the ringer over the last year. Hospital systems have experienced economic challenges, a reduction in workforce, and of course, the continuing challenges related to COVID.

With all that is going on, keeping morale high might seem like a gargantuan task.

In this episode, Jordan Voigt , President, Genesis Medical Center - Davenport, talks about how his team instituted an initiative around positivity and optimism, and how it resulted in improved levels of happiness, despite these challenging times.

We discuss:

  • Investing in the personal happiness of medical center staff.
  • How a focus on optimism influenced the center during COVID.
  • Strategies for recruitment and retention.
  • The challenges of vaccine mandates.

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

I just love the program so much. It focuses not necessarily on the business results, which are very important,or the outcomes, but personal happiness. You're listening to heroes of healthcare,the podcast that highlights bold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforminglives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the heroesof healthcare podcast. I'm your host, Ted Wayne. On today's episode I'mjoined by a dynamic young hospital executive, Jordan boy. Jordan is a CEOof Genesis Medical Center in Davenport, Iowa. Jordan Directs Daytoday, operations of thehealth system's largest entity, a five hundred and two bed medical center withtwo campuses, overseeing four dred and fifty physicians, three thousand staff and overonzero volunteers. Jordan brings a unique blend of execution and leadership to the role. Prior to covid Jordan and genesis were featured in a Harvard Business Review articleabout the power of positivity. will discuss with Jordan how we used the happinessadvantage and the orange frog, yes, you heard right, the orange frog, to help the staff get through some dark days. Join me and welcomingJordan boy to the show. Welcome to the PODCAST, Jordan's great having youhere. Well, thank you so much. I'm excited to be here. Yeah, let's dive right in. I would love to ask you to sharewith our listeners a little bit about your background, how you got to Davenportand the Medical Center and what has led you into the passion of medical profession. Yeah, well, thanks again, Ted for having me here. Jordanvoight, president at Genesis Medical Center Davenport, where a license five hundred two bedfacility that serves eastern Iowa Western Illinois, or part of Genesis health system,which is a five hospital nonprofit health system covering again, Eastern Iowa WesternIllinois. So we're, quote unquote, the mother ship of the hell systemand we're here to meet the tertiary care needs. So my day today jobresponsibilities or the quality, the safety, strategic growth, financial management, employeeengagement and physician engagement. So it's a dynamic day day in and day out, and I've been the president here at the Medical Center for six years andat the hell system for a little over ten years. That's awesome. That'sawesome. And what made you decide to get into medicine and what was youreducation and and you know, for some of the listeners, to become aCEO of a hospital is probably a little bit different path than a Cmo whois coming through the medical track. So if you don't mind, share alittle bit about that and and how you how you got into this role ofbeing CEO? Yeah, I happy to I went to Augustina College and RockIsland, Illinois for undergraduate degree and in that experience he had a couple differentinternships, one in retail, one in logistics, one in supply chain.And I didn't feel like a hit my niche or hit my stride. Andwhile I was serving on the alumni board as a student member at Augustina College, I met at the time former CEO...

...of Northwestern University Medical Center in Chicagoand then also cottage health system out of Santa Barbara, California, and theysaid, Jordan, you have to look at healthcare administration. I said,well, what's healthcare administration? So I have that running through back of myhead and then at the same time, unfortunately, my grandfather was passing awayat Cottage Hospital and gales were Illinois, and I was there and in theroom and I saw a number of gentlemen walking through with suits and I saidto my dad what did hey doing? He said, Oh, this isregulatory they're always coming in the hospitals. I said, well, who runsthe hospital? He talked about the balance of the medical staff and administration.I said, well, that seems pretty neat and I'll never forget he's rubbedhis forehead. He said, Jordan, you never wanted to do that job. There's never enough resources and a lot of stress and demands. And thenone thing led the next. And then did a number of interviews with localhealthcare CEOS to learn more about hospital administration and the economy was real bad.Graduated on graded and two thousand and nine. So two thousand and eight was achallenge coming out in the workforce and I said, you know what,we're going to go to graduate school. So applied to number of different programsand was blussed to get into University of Alabama at Birmingham. So went downthere for two years. It's a three year program, two years academic andthen one year fellowship, and did a summer internship at northwestern and Chicago andthen did the fellowship here at Genesis and one thing led to the neck.So it's always that dynamic day and very interesting. Yeah, each day wedon't. We always said the path we end up traveling is never, he'svery rarely the path we thought we would end up on. Right exactly.And what's even more fastening, my mom was a teacher, dad was abanker and I have two younger sisters, twin sisters, Katie and emily,and one both of them work in healthcare. We all do. One works forintuitive Du Vin Chi, yeah, robotic sales, and then the otherone is a physician assistant at northwestern hematology oncology. So it's always interesting weget around the table for a Thanksgiving meal, because one clinical bedside, one salesroup and I'm administrations. We always jokingly love to point the finger righteach other. You're always the problem. Yeah, that's great, that's awesome. So I guess where did you grow up? Grew up in bedding orfire was, so not too far from here and even though love the quadcities, I didn't have any intention come back here and love the south,living in Birmingham, Alabama, but it was a good opportunity for the administrativefellowship and just have been here ever since. It's great that you're there and I'msure they appreciate everything that you're doing. So one of the things I wantedto spend some time talking about, and we'll kind of jump into everybody'sfavorite topic, not covid and what's going on and now that we're coming backaround again, I guess some people calling it the third wave, some peoplecalling it the fourth wave. So we could talk a little bit more aboutthat and how that's impacting genesis and Davenport. But I love this article that cameout last summer from Harvard Business Review around optimism. So before we getto some of the doom and gloom, let's talk about some optimism here andand what you did there to kind of help turn around the morale of thehospital in the system. So if you don't mind, you mind summarizing kindof that? What happened that situation?...

Genesis was facing some difficult times andand you decided to take a little different proach. Yeah, thanks to alwaysenjoy and passionate speaking about optimism and positivity. But as back in two thousand andseventeen that became pres in the hospital was right around two thousand and fourteenand so we are a couple years in and financially challenged here at the hellsystem, and so we were going through some budgetary constraints and had to reducecost pressures and the same time working on employee engagement and the most passionate orand not only employee but physician engagement. And was blessed enough that with ourmanager the cancer center, Joel Moore, who does a great job, foundthis book called Happiness Advantage, and happiness advantage, if you have not readit, as an outstanding book by Shawn Acre, and it's all about creatingsocial connections, improving positivity optimism. How do you connect have the same vision? How do you change the context your Lens? You know, my favoritequote from Shawn Acres Research is ninety percent of your long term happiness is basedon your perception of events and ten percent are external events that are caused uponyou. And so it's all how do we change the context of our lends? So, senior leadership team, we read this book happiness advantage by ShawnAcre and after that we found out there's a parable or a training course andmethodology deemed orange frog, and so it's all about different frogs and different pondsand the one pond is an outlier pond happy, there's another pond, newtri pond and the negative pond, and it's all about how you want tomove towards the happiness pond and how team work can take you there. Andso we did the training through international thought leader and it's an eighthour training course. So all the GMC Davenport Management Team members we went through that this andthen we rolled it out to the entire workforce. And so we had aboutone two hundred staff members go through this training and fortunately during Covid we hadto pause because it's an in person eight our training. But excited and thrilledwe did the training and then we did training within our physician engagement team andphysician frontline staff members as well. And so we actually took a survey fourweeks prior to the training and then four weeks post training, and it's beenunbelievable the results, and I believe that's what you're referencing. The Harvard BusinessReview Heard about our story in publish the results on changing the optimism. Sowhat we're cost cutting. Fortunately, we all had mandatory PTO. We hadto cut benefits, change the constructure organization and in the midst of that transformationthere was improved levels of happiness, improved levels of optimism about the organization.And it's all how we change the context of our lents. So every trainingclass that we held I would personally kick it off and go around the roomand do names and introductions and we usually do a class of twenty, fiveto thirty individuals and in that discussion we always talked about how powerful would itbe if we all came to medical center with a positive attitude and what wecould do together. And one little side story, and my team members wouldlaugh if they heard me talk about this, but I don't like the heat andI I'm wearing a suit right now...

...and it's a little warm today.But before the training I'd walk outside and say, Cheesy, I'm in mysuit, I'm already sweating, I'm driving in, I need to get toair conditioning. Now after the training I walk outside I'd say, wow,it's a little warm, but it's a beautiful day. And I tell theteam if we all, fifteen hundred of US coming to the Medical Center,had that same change in attitude, what can we do together? Same withthe physicians. How can we all work together? So there's so many storiesand I could go on and on about it, but it's really changed theculture here at the Medical Center. And then the hell system has adopted theseprinciples and we'll be starting up training as well well. I love that andI love everything about optimism. As a young college graduate, somebody had givenme this the book. It's an old book, classic by Napoleon Hill,but success through a positive mental attitude and that was a big change, youknow, big change for myself in terms of how you approach things and andhow and how you do things. I think I remember I saw one ofthe pieces was the reduction in stress during that period of time when from elevenpercent down to six percent. With some of the statistics out of the report, and while I know the report and that instance of that period of timethat genesis was going through that, if I'm correct, that was pre covidthat you guys were doing that correct. So I have to believe, andI'd loved you to tell us a little bit more, but how did thatunknown readiness of this kind of disposition you were encouraging the team in the staffto do. How do you think that helped you get through the covid situation. Did you see that those tools that were brought on, you know,by the happiness advantage really carried you guys through the the tough times of Covid? Yeah, exactly, and I couldn't believe what I was seeing in fact, in such dire straits taking care of the covid patients. And want torecognize the frontline staff members here and all their hard work and going above andbeyond. But there were a little bright spots of happiness. So, forinstance, we have tube systems that we use to move pharmaceutical agents throughout theMedical Center and one staff member that thought would be a fun idea, andit was a great idea, put an orange frog, get in there andsend it to every unit. So when the Orange Frog got to the worthopedicunit, the Ortho staff put a little cast on it and then moved itto the surgical specialty unit and they put a little cafet or on the OrangeFrog, and then the OB unit, and so every unit customized it.Or would walk through the medical center and the orange frogs, we literally haveorange frogs all around, have a little mask on the Orange Frog and thereare bright spots of happiness. We have these Orange Frog capes for pediatric patientsbefore they go back for surgery, and so in the midst of chaos,sometimes on happiness anxiety, to see a little child's smile walking down the hallway, even with the mask on. But having the Kate for so many storiesof positivity and bright spots and frankly it's brought the physician administration relationship closer becausewe even have some physician providers that will say to their colleague, Hey,that wasn't a very orange comment. So respectfully calling them out saying that wasn'ta very positive comment. How can we change the context ever, lens orsee it differently? Yeah, man,...

I love that. I love thatwhen you can bring something into the work world that provides that common language,that taxonomy, you know, that ability to just say something as simple asthat wasn't very orange and everybody goes, okay, I know what you're talkingabout and they're probably sitting they going Yep, you're right, that wasn't very orangeof me and I've got to change my disposition exactly. And I justlove the program so much. It focuses not necessarily on the business results,which are very important, or the outcomes, but personal happiness. So there wasa story I was kicking off a session. This was a couple yearsago, and there's a gal coming in and during the introductions in her maskreawas running and she seems stressed and I said, ma'am, do you needa moment? You need to step out. So No, I've heard so muchabout this and I need this from my personal happiness. I worked twelvehour shift yesterday. I'm a single mom, newly divorce and I've been up allnight with to teething kids. But I knew I needed to come herebecause I'm so appreciative of the organization investing in me as a person. Ineed this for my own personal happiness and so it's just evolved over time andin fact it changes my personal habits. So every medical staff member's birthday rightI'm a little birthday card and there's this chewing happiness that goes on front withan orange frog and there's so many different husbands or wives that will stop meout in the community and say hey, thanks for taking time to write acard. But more importantly, it forced a conversation at home when I saidHey, what's this card and why is there an orange frog coming from thehospital? And at for is that medical staff member to smile and chuckle andtell the story about what genesis is doing, about positivity in the journey they're on, and it's really involved in our overall community as well well. It'sawesome and that and that's what you know. I love the fact that you pointthat out because it's amazing the reach hospital systems in the community, howthe impact they have on the community and how they can be such a anoutreach is there as well. You know, sometimes I think we think it's behindthose four walls of the hospital and that's where everything happens, but alot of the public service things, little things like this that you can createthat become part of your culture, has, you know, long, long reachingtentacles that we don't even always realize or see exactly. We've been blessedwith US rolling out the happiness advantage or in trog and they should have.The local school district has gotten on board and trained all their teachers and facultyand Bus Drivers and others, and even the local police department rolled it out. Davenport police and junior achievement so other businesses have as well. It's amazing, that's that's awesome, that's great. So obviously the as you guys rolledthis out and you saw it coming through. It obviously sustained people to get throughthe covid situation, the covid challenges and whatnot. Tell me a littlebit about let's back up and go to kind of first wave. You know, summer of two thousand and twenty, spring, summer of two thousand andtwenty. When was Iowa really big impact? You know, each part of thecountry had their different kind of spike periods and you know it started inOregon, was real big in the West...

...and then it you know, kindof popped up in different places. But last summer, last fall, whatwas the what was the dynamic like? In Davenport? It was really inthe fall where it really took off here. I think we got a high upto about a hundred and twenty covid positive patients. And again want torecognize in all the effort goes to our physician team members and frontline staff.We were blessed enough. We love the motto here physician led professionally manage.So when covid hit we wanted the clinical key decisionmakers making the guidelines and policiesand procedures for the institution. So we set up a covid nineteen physician executivecommittee, so the President of medical staff, the chief medical officer here and myselfhelp lead this committee. So we had about twelve key physicians on thecommittee with administrative and clinical team members that would make all of our policies andprocedures, because we were in unchartered territories in regards to appropriate PPE and guidanceand daffing guidance because unfortunately we had to double room patients here and our medicalpulmonary staff really stepped up to the plate and did a phenomenal job, butit was was eye opening. I'll never, never forget on a Friday afternoon whenwe had to make the call to double room patients because we have allsingle occupancy patients. Didn't think that was fair to put it on the frontline staff. So the chief medical officer and myself went in to each individualpatients room to tell them that he or she was going to have a roommatebecause we were out of space and out of beds and we're putting two bedsin each room and I'll never forget how gracious, just in complimentary the patientswere of the front line staff members here at Genesis, how thankful they said, understand, you know, I realize I don't want a roommate, butI don't want to go anywhere. The cares outstanding here and I appreciate allthat you're doing. And again, all the credit goes to the front linestaff from the physician teams. But it was eye opening. Ted just seeingcovid patients on the TV, TV, but actually being in the rooms communicatingwith them, and your heart goes out because they can barely breathe and they'rejust so focused on breathing. It's something I'll never forget. Know this.These last few years have we've seen positive things that have come out of themand and things like that, but definitely we've all experienced different trials during thesetimes. If we didn't, we probably never even thought of our could imagine. But yet here we were in the in the in the middle, inthe middle of it. So you get through, you kind of get throughthe fall, you're kind of doubling up and then we get into January.How did you guys, partner with so even during the crisis and then wecan lead right into a little bit as vaccination start to come out. Howhave you guys been partnering with the Community? Right? So we talked about thatcommunity involvement during the crisis, where you guys bringing in, you know, the mayor and the different municipal support systems as part of that total plan. Yeah, and we were fortunate to have a team approach even with thelocal competitor in the market unity point and collaborated with them and our Quad Citycommunity, which is it's called Quad cities of actually made up of five cities, had a covid nineteen cod lets and committee made up a position members toreally guide the overall community. So I...

...appreciate the team approach and we wereon the same page with the competitor here. So one institution, intentionally or unintentionally, didn't have an edge over the others, whether who's doing surgery who'snot, and we had a team approach. We roll out consistent message, andit still says the same today, of need to vaccinate to improve youknow, it's sad and it's unfortunate. Ted We even have patients coming intothe Medical Center and we have about twenty four covid positive patients here today,of which about seven and intensive care unit. But patients come here they say hey, I'm covid positive, I don't feel well, I need to cometo the hospital. Can I have the vaccine now? And so our frontlineclinicians have a done a nice job educating. That should have been done previously.There's nothing we can do for you now except the same standard of carehere at the institution or every other hospital once you're covid positive and you seekingmedical intention. So it kills me to hear about the regret of some individualsand that's why we're passionate on advocating for vaccine adherents and in fact we rentedthe former Dick Sporting good location the genesis health group staff members did a greatjob having a vaccination of mass vaccination clinic, and so on a positive note,we've seen an uptick, I believe last week and we had over twohundred individuals walk in for Covid nineteen vaccination. So we had a lull, butnow at the Delta Varian I think overall the general feel or people aregetting a little nervous and want to seek the vaccine a nation because there's provenevidence behind it. Yeah, I you know, I think you know youand I mentioned that. There was a great article in the Atlantic and theywere talking about the Hubris of the American population and how those who didn't getit or weren't affected by it, a symptomatic whichever. Who knows what theywere this stun the first big wave of it, felt that they didn't needto get vaccinated because obviously it didn't touch them. But then here it isagain and it's coming back around again and and some people are being are beingtouched. And you know, I'm sure, I'm sure when we look back,there's probably and there's not going to be one family in the United Statesor around the world who doesn't have a story about how this impacted them orthey knew somebody or so on. So, yeah, but that that education justcontinues to show itself. You know, unfortunately they're continues to be misinformation inthe market. We live in an era of that. But, asyou said, that story of somebody coming in and saying I have it andI'm ready for the vaccine, thinking that's just going to fix it. It'ssad because obviously they believed that, you know, I'll wait. If Iget it, I'll get the vaccine and if I don't get it, I'llbe okay. And but there's a there's a there's a disconnect there. Sothat's that is that is unfortunate, and so on. If I can justadd touch and then the poor little kids in the community to under the ageof twelve not eligible for the vaccination. And personally, we am a wifeand I have a four year old, two year old and ten month old, and so I always try to be safe when out and about and wearingmasks and mitigate them out and close public...

...setting area. But you feel forall of them too, and nervous about schools, right, and so Iwas just going to ask that. So here in the south where we're located, schools are starting and have started in there, kicking back into gear,I guess, in as to hear what you said, Devenport, you guyshaven't started yet, but what is I was kind of what are you hearing? Are they are they going to mandate masks? So they're going to sayno mask we here in Florida. They don't want me. You know,they're saying no masks. You and in some places there. It's it's fluidright. It's changing every day. It's fluid here as well. I knowthe governor did send out a mandate about no mask within the education setting andI know individual school districts are discussing so I think we're on the similar pageas what I'm hearing in Florida our other areas, and so I think everyfamily's discussing personal choices based on those within the government making official decisions. Andhave they talked? This is a thing to just pop into my head andI haven't read anything about it. Have they talked about the parents option?In other words, if you see, if you and your wife said we'renot comfortable sending our kids back with no masks, obviously I would think ifthey wanted to wear a mask you could be masked optional. But if they'resaying no, no masks, and you do say then I'm going to goback to the home schooling situation right now at a schools saying they're all they'reallowing that choice. That's a good question, I believe. So said, butwe're my wife and I personally are a little more focused on the PREK. So within the pre K it were fortunate and blessed that they they encouragea mask wearing. So we feel better that way. But that's a goodquestion. I'm not too sure about the overall school this is you know,in the last year that everybody said, you know, when they came backit was optional. If you still not feeling safe about it, keep yourkids home and do home schooling and do that. But now that they're tryingto push everybody. But I know I also read, I think the ArkansasGovernor, his name is blanking me out. He's rolling back his position. Hesays I wish I hadn't, I hadn't pushed so hard for the nomasks. He's now saying let's start masking up again. So well, that'sgood to hear because I even know state and Arkansas and even Missouri have beencalling up to the state of Iowa looking for medical bed placements for covid nightteam patients because they're just overwhelmed within their own healthcare systems locally. Yeah,so we're living we're living an interesting time. So you said at the height ofthe fall of covid you guys had a hundred and twenty and you saidright now, you said it. I forget what number right around twenty four, I believe the correct number of it's seven or in the ICEEU. Soyou still have that. Very concerning critical care patient have been a lators,but every has it stopped? Have you guys started? But yeah, Iassume you had started back into the surgeries and things like that and right nowthose are not being impacted. You're still able to keep all the services open. Correct, I would say it's touch and go. Every day or evenin the evening. We're planning. Fortunately or unfortunately, no one has necessarilyelective surgery. So you need heart surgery, you need the total joint has beengoing a year plus, but we are just collaborating much more planning forbed. How do we make it work?...

We're asking staff members and procedural areasto even pick up and other areas within the medical center and we're justtrying to balance all of it. Yeah, well, that's it right. Andand because you don't know what tomorrow will bring, Don Alston, there'sanother surge and that changes the changes everything. So it isn't it is a dayby it is a day by day sort of situation. So what interms of from your guys planning for the remaining part of the year? Isit just a day by day thing or what do you guys what are youguys trying to see for the remaining part of this year? Day by dayoverall, but our number one focus here at the hell system is recruitment andor attention of current staff members and really focus on culture, positivity, theOrange Frog initiative market. We're blessed to have Amazon come in the community,and I say bless with a little hesitation because that's a thousand jobs. Aminimum starting wage is sixteen dollars an hour paid paternity maternity. That's a challengewhen you have wide varying wage rates here within the organization that the Medical Center. To compound that, there's a nursing shortage here. We have twenty fiveinternational nurses that are in the process of coming here. Unfortunately, about threeFourth of those twenty five nurses have their visas being held up at the localembassies internationally. So we're working on that. We're working on retaining staff, becausestaff we re see very large bonuses out there, Twentyzero sign on bonuses, Tenzero, eight thousand and said what are you doing to keep me?And so we work. We're doing appreciation events. We did a little appreciationbonus for frontline staff members here as well increasing market pay. We've increased inStam pay. We're spending significant amounts on INCENTA pay, mandatory overtime premium payhere within the Medical Center, and so we're just trying to balance it toget through because our board, rightfully so, hide holds this very high standards onquality and safety and we're blessed to be named top fifteen health system twotimes in a row here genesis. So we're focus on quality and safety,but our key initiatives number one, recruit member attention, number two quality andsafety and then number three to patient experience, and that's really our key focus areasfor this entire year. Well, it's great. Well, obviously gettingthat award twice as shows that you guys are focused on the right things,because it's paying off. Talk to me a little bit about thoughts within theadministration on mandates. We're hearing that too with the vaccination mandate, and it'sa fine line, right, because we want the health and safety as youtalked about. So we want to you know, one side of the brainsays let's mandate so we ensure health and safety. The other side says,if I do that, I may lose people right at there's and right now, as you said, we're trying to recruit. The last thing I wantto do is is evoke a policy that might have US lose head count.Yeah, timely question Ted, because we just announced last week we'll be requiringit by November. Eight for all team members. And so overall at thehell system level we're about seventy percent vaccinated.

However, that's an overall number.We have some departments that are hundred percent vaccinated. We have some departmentsthat are eighty four percent non vaccinated. And so you look at one area, stero processing. We've worked so hard on strategic growth, Oh our recruitmentretention for staff members, but our second shift, Staro processing, we havesome challenges in regards the vaccination rate. So the last thing we want todo is have people go into final level of correct and of action. We'renot terming people, but they go in the final level. However, thefinal level means no merit increases, unable to advance from your position. Soit's real unfortunate. So we're trying to work and again we take the philosophyphysician led professional manage with our medical directors physician leaderships to go down and meetwith staff members. So are blessed to have Dr Christoffers in a general surgeonthat met with the our staff members. Staff members were pushing back and sayingwhy, Oh, I require it, and he says, well, whynot? Give me a reason why not. And same with vice present medical affairs. met with the Stero Processing Department and there's so much misinformation out thereand they're quoting areas from facebook and through the misinformation and educate. But wealso have a process for those individuals that might have some varying religious beliefs thatthey can go in front of a physician committee and make an argument within theircase. So it's a hot topic and unfortunately we might lose a couple staffmembers but long term I think it's the right route to go. I'll giveyou an example. Ted I just anytime I get the patient compliment or patientcomplaint to my personal cell phone or Voicemel here at the officer I would taketime to call that individual back. They call back. Last week it wasa beautiful patient compliment of an Orthopedic Procedure and Love The staff and everything andsaid Will Jordan, since I have you on the phone, I just wantto share one piece of information. I said, well, what's that?Well, my ninety two year old grandfather was there and the staff members maskkept falling down below the nose and I said, do you mind put yourmask up and, by the way, are you vaccinated? In the staffmember said no, I'm not vaccinated and she kind of paused and said thecare was fabulous, everything was outstanding, but my ninety two year old who'svaccinated, and we know Delta can be transmitted even vaccinated to vaccinated person orunvaccinated to vaccinating. It just made me feel uncomfortable. So how can yousay, Jordan, you care about the health of the community and you're notrequiring everyone to get the vaccination. So it's a fine balance and we're tryingto do the best we can. Yeah, no, and it is. Youknow, I'd love that. Ask You too, if if you canshare kind of just overall and and then I'll make my comment. But overall, what are you what are you hearing? Seems to be the biggest reservation.So when your medical staffs going to meet with the department that obviously islow vaccination. Are the reasons across the board, very varying, different personalthis or is there seemed to be a predominant here's why I don't want todo it. I think a couple care is one, concerns about infertility,perceptions around that issue. Number two, I already had covid why do Ineed to get this? And the argument...

...back is, and I'll be thefirst one to say I'm not a clinician or not physician, so I alwaysdelegate this area responsibility to the physician staff. But it's the same with the flu. You know, we require the flu vaccination. Some people might getflu, let's say in August, but we required in November. We neversay Oh, you're not, you don't have to get the flu vaccination becauseyou already had fluent September. It's just a booster. Think that's another area. And then, unfortunately the third aspect as more of an individual thought processon I don't like organizations. The perception is overstepping bounds. But we don'tget that pushback for flu, but we get it for covid nineteen. AndI think the last aspect that the FDA has an officially come out, eventhough I know it's short, and anticipation. So those are probably the four keyareas. Okay, yeah, I think you know that piece. II feel that that piece that says I either I had it or I feelI don't feel vulnerable to it. I'm not of I'm not a high riskperson. So if I think if I'll get it, I can fight it. I do think that those things become, from myself personally speaking, frustrating becausethe science that you had mentioned, which is yes, but you couldbe carrying it and transmitting it to other people and not even know it.So yeah, so that part of it I get. Gets, I getis is a little frustrating, but you know, you they're in most people'sback of their mind, right. The concern also becomes is, as we'veall seen. The analogy I use once in a while is that, youknow, when round up came out on the market, everybody was using itsaying this is the greatest thing in the whole world, right, and nowwe know it's it's not there. And I guess right, that's the concern. But again, my counter own my own counter argument. Get debate myselfhere to it and my only counter argument is we've had vaccination and even thoughthis technology, a lot of people say is new, it's not so new, and with the MRNA. But the thing we've had, you know,we've eradicated polio, we've almost eradicated so many diseases through the vaccination process thatobviously we know that that it works. But we do live in in anage, in a day where there's just information just everywhere. So yeah,I know we have to get some more information around the vaccine to we've hadsome episodes around it. It's been helpful. But you know, the fertility piecebecomes an issue and it's and how do you how do you find?And you know we're learning every day. Even the doctor doctors are learning what'snew every day. Couldn't agree more so any talk within the organization around booster. I mean there's some still no real clarity yet what the CDC is goingto recommend or what the F well, the FDA still approving the first batch, but you know there's there is becoming some conversations around the fall we're goingto start seeing a booster and we also hear some facilities are still anticipating afalse spike, not even just dealt of varying. It just normal cold andLucy'son sort of rises. Have you guys spoken about that at all? Yeah, I think two fold. One maybe...

...to take your a lot of question. First yes, in particular around RSV, we've had an increase within the pediatricpopulation for RUSB and frankly, even adults coming in with RSV. Youknow the thought process. It's Covid but tests and come back positive for RSV. So that's an area concern we're anticipating and unfortunately, even the past coupleweeks we've been slowly going up as a census. The issue that compounds isyeah, you might get one or two patients coming in covid positive, butyou have to remember all the patients that are still here and so there's acompounding effect. And that's in addition to the heart attacks that unforcelenter coming in, the strokes, all the other medical conditions that are going on. Sothat's a challenge and we're trying to proactively move in that direction anticipate with travelers. I talked about international nurses are keen on coming here and so we're tryingto skate where the puck is going, but unfortunately we're going to be realchallenge if we have to surge to a hundred twenty patients again and will haveto reduce surgeries, which is scary for those community members who are counting ontheir surgical procedures to be done, anticipating that want to get better and we'rehaving to put off care. That's not always an area concern. And nowand what then? Tell us what any conversations around the booster? The booster? We look really we have our physician covid nineteen physician executive committee actually everyMonday. So today at noon will meet with them and that is on thatgender discuss and we'll just follow everything the CDC recommends and we're blessed to stillhave the dicks sporting good least that we still have available to Max Vaccinations andother era. So we will respond in accordance to the CDC guidelines. Sokind of last thing here, wrapping up. Speaking of the CDC, I'm notagain to try not to get political, but there's they've definitely come under somefire for not being timely, not being clear or anything like that,and there's been some criticisms that that's politically motivated, I think. I thinkI think who's going to win the world series this year will be politically motivated. I think everything coming politically voted. I agree. I agree you guysstill feeling strong that that is the best source of information for people, thatthe CDC guidelines are really is really the guide book for us to follow.We do and we realize it's fluid as well. And then we're blessed havegreat physician leadership with Dr Anderson, the chief Metacorll Sir, and that DrMattwanni, who's our local infectious disease provider. So between those two, looking atthe CDC guidelines, infection prevention, working with our county health department,those are really the areas that we focus and follow. But I agree,it's fluid. Mask on, you don't need your mask. Now, masksback on and we always try to take the most conservative approach, because what'sthe downside of doing it? Masking up, you know, everyone should be doingthat. And now even in meetings, even if we've all been back,so we all wear a mask as well. Yeah, well, right, where I work at the same thing, we've gone back to it. Wewent away from it and it was okay if you were vaccinated and there. Now we've gone back to it because of the situation in meetings and aroundpublic areas. So yeah, time to...

...just makes sense. So, Jordan, thanks so much for your time. I mean, I think I mentionedto you we always kind of close these recordings and the episodes with my favoritequestion, which is who is your hero, whether it was growing up or currentlyor both. I said there's no wrong answer, but would you sharewith the listeners who was your hero and why? Yeah, I probably saytwo individuals. If I can be in my hero I'll combo both. Onemy grandfather. I remember this, my mom's Dad. He lived in whyI'm safe, foster home and moved around with his mother and I remember himtell me stories. Slept on the ground and he joined the Navy to puthimself through college and got his Ph D. and you know, if it wasn'tfor him and this tenacity to do better himself with education, there's noway I would be here today doing what I'm doing. And then so blessedfor that and all the sacrifices he made. And then also my dad. Ilearned a lot of management lessons from dad, emotional intelligence, how todeal with complex issues, take on approach communication and dad really drilled into mehow to approach difficult issues. He worked in management as well within banking.Pushed me to be better. And if it wasn't for my dad, Istill remember traveling down to my interview at University of Alabama and Birmingham and Ididn't have a suit and he let me borrow his and he got it allstitched up so I can go into interview and drove twelve hour straight, twelvehours back, and I just appreciate and thankful for all the sacrifices he didfor not alowing myself my sister ors, and so those two gentlemen have alot to be thankful for. I love that. You know, yeah,we don't know how people influence our lives and the little things and the littlegestures mean so much. So it's great. Hey, thanks for your time.I love the whole Orange Frog thing. I can't wait to get ahold ofthe happiness advantage book. Will throw a link out on the on thewebsite for our listeners if they want to get it by Sean acres. Obviouslyit is something you guys just grabbed the hold of and acculturated it, whichis a word I love to use. Right, you made a part ofthe fabric of your organization. It became a common language, a common mantra, and and the proof is it carried you guys through some really difficult times, not only through a reduction of force and economic challenges, but then obviouslyit prepared you guys perfectly for the covid crisis that we've all been dealing with. So I love that, love the story, Love your passionate about healthcareand just are I'm sure the People Davenport are thrilled that you're there helping themout every day. Well, thank you, ted, appreciate it and thanks forhaving me. I enjoyed the opportunity. Yeah, it was fun. We'lldo it again. Will I always like to say circle back and we'llstart having some conversations again and check in and see how things go. Alwayswant to keep the door open. Well, thank you, thank you all.Thanks you, Jordan. Right. You've been listening to heroes of healthcare. For more, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visitus at heroes of healthcare podcastcom.

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