Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 4 months ago

Mental Health: Caring for the Medical Community

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Mental health issues — burnout, depression, anxiety, and suicide — are multiplying in the medical community. And the stresses of COVID have only exacerbated what was already a worrisome trend.

In this episode, Dr. Kellie Stecher, Co-Founder & President of Patient Care Heroes, shares what she has been doing to bring much-needed mental health resources and care to the heroes who care for us.

What we talked about:

  • The effects of the pandemic on her OB/GYN practice
  • Supporting the mental health of the medical community
  • Advocating for gender equity issues and a safe reporting structure for harassment and bullying

Heroes of Healthcare is hosted by Ted Weyn.

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

You were listening to heroes of healthcare, the podcast that highlights bold selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's getinto the show, welcome to the heroes of health carepodcast, I'm your host Ted Wayne, I'm joined today by Dr Kelly Stacker KellyStacker, is an O B G Y N and M health, fair view, women center in a denum,Minnesota, she's, Co, founder and president of Patient Care Heroes.Obviously a topic that's near and dear to our hearts here at this show andchief of reproductive medicine and health care equity for aims. Her focusis on advocacy and policy change, centering around physicians, themedical community, improving the culture of medicine and making patientcare safer. We're excited to talk with doctor Stacker to day, as she justlaunched an organization, patient care heroes reflecting a community ofleaders and innovators who are willing to go an extra mile and put serviceahead of their personal needs. This organization was created with love andcompassion as a way to provide assistance to families and loved onesof Physicians, nurses, medical assistants, dentists, e m s and otherswho have died from Covin nineteen or by other means in the line of duty. Thecountry is suffered a collective trauma and there is a need to grieve together.This organization will create a hub where that can occur. The main focus atthis time is to create a platform where the medical community can obtain accessto barrier free mental health resources, create awareness around the physiciansuicide and advocate for legislative changes to protect the community. It'sour pleasure to have a fellow individual who wants to celebrate theheroes of health care, join our show to day welcome doctor stacker thanks somuch for having me. So we got lots to talk about today. I know we've chattedbefore so. It's going to be a fun episode to get into and learn a littlebit more about you and this crazy pandemic world that we've been in forthe last year or yeah Le Lit now a little over a year and then talk aboutyour passion project. So if you don't mind, let's just kick things off forthe audience and let us get to know you a little bit better and tell us alittle bit about your background where you hail from and a little bit about DrStecher today, so I grew up in Wisconsin, so I was a badger and apacker fan that was kind of like a big. You know cultural thing, because when Imoved to Minnesota, my husband is a definitely a vikings fan, so that was alittle bit of a issue and there I have. I have a sister and brother which aregreat grew up with them. My sister also moved to the twin cities, which iswhere I currently live, so I'm very fortunate to have her. In my life Iwent to medical college to Wisconsin, which was an awesome program. I can'tsay enough good things about them and then Michigan State, Greener, pins,medical education partners for my obion residency. We moved back to the twincities because we wanted to have more of a support team for my kids right,and so we have a eight and six year old, and you know this year has been anoutlier, but normally we are blessed with being able to see family on aregular basis, which includes my sister and her husband and my in laws, sonormally in a normal non pandemic world. It's really, it's really great to seepeople from there I started in private practice for a number of years recentlywent into the academic world and now work at m health. There view mostlybased in a Dyna Minnesota, and so I deliver babies out of Southall, and sothis year has presented new challenges for all of us and all along. I'vedefinitely been involved in different advocacy projects and talking to womenand especially about their struggles as an ob gyn and their concerns withworkplace, violence and domestic violence, and all that, so I've beeninvolved in those projects forever. However, with Ovid, it really blossomedthe need for more organization, around mental health resources and so seeing avoid in the medical community. That's...

...where I started working on my passionproject, which is patient care heroes. So that's that's kind of how thingshave been going this year, so you're up in the twin cities, and how long haveyou been there now so we have been here for about eight years now, okay, andwhen you were in med school, did you always know you wanted to go into ogyor was that a path that came to later? That's a great question. Actually I waspretty convinced I was going to be a pediatric cardol St, which is veryspecific. I realized, but I did some research with the Healthier PartnershipWisconsin and worked on getting ads into schools, and so I really feltpassionate about preventative care, preventive health care. However, when Iwas doing my pediatric Cardialgia Internship, I realize that I love allpresent and I love doing fetal acos, and so I realized that my favoriteparts of pediatric hardily were actually related to obstatics and notpediatric cordely, and so that kind of lend itself to trying everything outand when I did my first delivery. That was that I knew that I wanted to be aObin okay, it's not always but my wife volunteers in a Niku at the hospitalnear us here and she loves it too, and I've got a good friend who's an nobdyand he said he wanted to practice. Happy Medicine. You know you alwaysthink. For the most part, it's always happy and it's not always happy, butfor the most part, it's kind of a joyous moment in people's lives. Soyeah I mean we definitely have more than our fair share of good, and so Ihave a couple of friends who are doing pediatric on Cology and I think theyare the most amazing people. I just don't think I could. I could do it. Ithink I would have been burned out by now and somehow they go to work and arepositive and happy and excited, and they do things that are so hard, and Ican't even imagine- and so I do feel fortunate- that my specialty lendsitself to more happy moments yeah. Well, we all need to have our differentstrengths and gifts and everything and that's what makes it that's what makesthe world go around. So it's been an interesting year for a lot of peopleand I don't think anybody, as I say, had a pandemic plan in their lives, andso we did so. How has it been for you with your practice? What have you seenwhat has been interesting? I'd love to hear your opinion about vaccine withpregnant women, and some of that and what you're hearing I'm hearing thatit's okay, yes go forward, but that would love for you to share with theaudience and stuff what the expert says. Not what I hear well actually thank youfor bringing this up, because I still hear all the time for my patients,while my sisters physician so that she shouldn't get the vaccine and it makesme a little crazy hearing the mixed messages from different physicians,because really you should be having these conversations with your physician.Who knows your medical history. However, I am all for vaccinations. It is truethat the MRAVINA has been around a shorter period of time, but if you evengo on the CD website, you can look at the technology. The technology has beenaround for ten years, and so yes, ovid is a novel virus. And yes, we haven'thad these things around as long. However, it's a great technology, it'sa safe technology. It does not cause infertility, which is one of the thingsthat I've heard through the grape vine. So, on face book, there was like a memeor something about ovid vaccines, causing infertility and then the nextday we had a rash of people calling into the office saying Oh, my Gosh. Igot the vaccine, I'm going to be infertile, and so I think that a lot ofin this information has been really hard to combat, but I am all for it,I'm a big advocate for it and if people want to do their own research on it, Ithink that's great too, but if you go to the American College of Obi Juaan,if you go to the society for maternal feudal medicine and you look at theirinformation on the coved vaccine and you can read, their statements will be.Gin should be pro vaccination, because the risk of having severe, Ovid andpregnancy o weighs the risk to getting...

...the vaccine, and that's really thebottom line. Is We want to make sure that people are having healthypregnancies? We want to make sure that we're decreasing their risk of pre termlabor and delivery which severe ovid can do, and we don't want that, andit's really the right thing to do is to advocate you know. Study is obviouslyon this. What's also encouraging is we are seeing data that antibodies aregoing to be crossing the placenta to help protect the baby right, and so weknow that it's going to be a while before people can get these new bornsvaccinated. It's really encouraging seeing that things that we hypothesizewere probably going to be. The case are true, so I'm very happy about thatright. Great Yeah, so appreciate that- and you know, of course, everybody'sdifferent. So I appreciate your saying: You know check with your check withyour own personal physician, but you know the normal disclaimer statement,but that's great no, but it's actually true you need to well, you knoweveryone's got different allergy mean everyone's got a thing so yeah for sure.So talk about the last year. how Di impact your practice, how to impactwhat you were doing, what you were working on? How did things change as weentered into the last March when everything started to become real? So Ithink that Covin has really been a stress test for the medical community.You know just like you think about stress tests on the heart. It's reallyit really taxed us to our full potential, and I know that somecommunities were hit harder than others and we of course adapted right. We hada pivot, just like everybody else, and initially we did a lot of our visits.We atella health and we had not ever done that before. So that wasdefinitely something we needed to adapt to. I had a hard time with that,because I take care of you know: pregnant patients and I take care postpart of patients, and my worry was also missing, like mental health issuesright so a lot of the ways we diagnose people with anxiety, depression, thingslike that, we have to be there in person or to see their faces or tocommunicate with them, see their body language. That really gives us a lot ofinformation about how someone's doing, and so that did feel kind of adisconnected from those data points. However, we pivoted we worked it thingsseem to be going well and now that we're on the other side of it, we cantake a deep breath with that. However, my concern is: Did we learn anythingfrom these issues right, and so I want to make sure that we're cataloguing howwe handle this for future endeavors, because I don't think anyone needs togo through some of the stresses again. I know the medical community certainlydoesn't need to, and when I look at how we've kind of weathered the storm,physicians and nurses and texts and all of the health care community has wearedthe brunt of some of these issues in terms of almost like this moral injuryand stress right, because people thought like they were not protected tothe extent that they should have been across the country. People werestressed about speaking out when they didn't have enough PPE. Some peoplewere even fired, and so there's really kind of this inner turmoil. People hadabout how this was handled and, aside from that people become disenchantedwith being in medicine right, and we have different areas of the countrywhere people were told not to wear scrubs outside of their homes, becausethey were verbally in some cases, physically assaulted by people sayingthat coved was a hoax, and so it really did a huge number on the morale and themental health of the medical community M. Yeah. No, for sure- and I knowthat's going to that's a good segue, but I want to wait one minute becauseit leads us into your passion project you're getting right to the chase heretoday. I love that, are you see, go less hesitancy I mean. Obviously, we'veall become more educated about this right. We talked about that a littleearlier before and you know and we won't speculate what this will be twoyears from now and we don't know so, let's not go there, but are you findingan openness for patients to now start coming back in they're, morecomfortable with it? They're saying I want to be seen absolutely and I thinkthat that's so critical because we don't want to Miss Preventative CareRight, we don't want to miss cancer...

...screenings. We don't want to preventpeople from getting therapies that are going to help theirquality of life, and so I really has come back over the last couple monthshere. Great well, that's good and any downside have you seen people who should have waited too long out of fear,and you know now you're having to kind of rally to get some o them some helpquickly because they were just afraid to come in. That's a actually a greatquestion. So when the pandemic started, we started seeing an increase in peoplewanting to have home burks, and so we had people that weren't seeking ofSetra cure in the normal fashion and they weren't wanting to deliver in ahospital out of fear right and, unfortunately, you have peoplespreading misinformation. You have people who are fear mongering and truthbe told, being delivered in a hospital where we're decreasing your risk ofmorbidity, mortality and the baby's risk of morbidity. Mortality is still areally important thing and the hospitals have really done a great job,safeguarding the obstetrics units, and so that has been a challenge, makingsure that people understand we are here. We are safe. We are practicingappropriate guidelines. My group was really fortunate that we did notactually have any of our affaticar get ovid nineteen, because we were sodiligent in how we use PPE and we were collectively really looking out foreach other, and so a lot of the OB gins spent their time trying to make surethat their patients were safe, and so that's been a huge issue of. However,thankfully, we're not seeing that as much now that we have transitioned yeahwell and, like we said early now, education, you know we're all we're alla little smarter than we were a year ago and for a period of time- and Iknow because my niece had a child in last May and her anxiety all camearound from the fact that they were saying her husband wasn't going to beable to be with her during the delivery. Did you guys go through a period ofdoing that or no that was always the spouse, could be there or the c? Youknow the so significant other could be there with them. Thankfully we alwayshad the significant other present. I think that that would have been a hugeadded stress for people who are already stressed, as you you know, obviouslyheard. I know that New York New York City went through a very short timeperiod where they had that policy and that quickly got reverse. I think thegovernor reversed that, but we in Minnesota we did not have any of thoseissues, thankful well she's in New York, so that makes sense. That's why she hasthat New York was the yeah. That was the part. Yes, okay, good. So obviously,let's jump into your passion project. So, besides being a mom of two and anda practicing doctor, you've decided to take on a cause, that's you're, verypassionate about and that cause is called patient care heroes and for thelisteners if they want, they can start to learn more and we'll put this on ourwebsite and all. But it's patient care heroes, com and that's why we'd lovehaving Dor stickher here, because we are the heroes of health care and she'sgot patient her hero. So we had to have our fellow health care herorepresentative on the call, but why don't you tell us a little bit moreabout how this has come about? What what gave you this idea to go ahead anddo this and what community are you trying to serve? So when I was talking to people from around thecountry, I really saw that we had this void in mental health resources for themedical community and it all really stems from you know from not feeling appreciatedin the community from having this etua stress, this moral injury that wetalked about the rates of depression, anxiety where all people were feelingisolated, and so I realized we needed to do something to help this medicalcommunity and really to reach out for everybody who takes care of patientsright. So this is not focus solely on physicians or nurses. It's anyone who'staken care of patients, and with this we want to make sure that people haveaccess to barrier, free, free mental...

...health resources, and the reason whythat's important to me is when you look at different licensing applications,especially physician licensing agreements. We have to apply forlicenses every year and some of them really do appear to be in conflict withthe ADA, which is the American Disability Act, and they do talk about.Have you ever had a mental illness? Have you ever sought therapy or carefor mental illness, and the hard thing is: each state is governed differentlywith this by each different medical board, and I wanted to make sure thatpeople were not limiting their access because of fearful retaliation againsttheir license, and so that's why I wanted to make sure that we wereanonymous. We could help them. We could provide them resources. Aside from that,I just have have seen this developing mental health crisis in the medicalcommunity for years, looking at equity issues and burn out, and all of thatkind of ones itself to depression, anxiety and looking at women who leavemedicine. One and eight women will leave medicine or go part time beforetheir six years out of residency, and so all of that kind of funnel togetherfor Covin, and then it was kind of like the match on the gas right. I mean itreally kind of propelled everything and made everything worse, and so we needto make sure that we're taking care of the people who take care of us and withthat we also wanted to create a platform where we can have advocacy forthese things right and so we're going to be working with differentorganizations nationally to make sure that legislation is a dented to helpprotect the medical community as well. I mean that's amazing, so it soundslike- and I want to. I want to pull this apart a little bit, because Ithink this is so important, so you recognize the need in the market. Younever recognize the need for some advocacy. You recognize the need for aplace to go where you can feel safe to get help. If you need help so patientCare Heroes, is it an advocacy group? Is it a support mechanism platformbreak it apart from me, because it sounds like you're trying to do alittle bit of both and part of it sounds like well, we want a lobby which, which is awesome right, becausethat's what you're trying to say, which is hey these questions. These questionsare on now. The word is illegal, but these questions aren't right becausethey allow the boards to form a bias which may not be accurate or may not besomething which should be held against them as we're pursuing help and so on.So I hear that advocacy part and getting some legislation changed and orrules changed, but then I also know there's a heart for let's create aplatform where people can seek and find help where they may not have feltcomfortable were not know where to turn in the past. So we are going to do alittle bit of all that right, and so we are going to have a branch where we'regoing to have a political action committee, we're going to call it thevoices of Patient Care Heroes and we have been in contact with anotheramazing group out of Kaiser. So there is a gale named Dor Jennifer wise whostarted speak up Ortho, who you know really has a passion for gender equityissues and to help safe card women. Just as I have tried to work on for thelast several years, and so we are going to have a branch of patient care heroesthat can really be an advocate for change. That's going to help themedical community launch into the next couple of years, because if we don'tfix some of these issues, we're going to have problems and so making surethat there's like a national application process for physicians,making sure that there's a safe reporting structure for harassment andbullying, that's kind of on one side of it. The platform itself of Patient CareHeroes is one making sure that we're providing mental health resources forpeople humanizing the people who have worked so hard for our communities. Sowe want to tell their stories. We want to celebrate them. We want to make surethat they are valued right and this goes beyond Ovid. This is a I foreverything in my opinion, because...

...people have sacrificed their lives andhealth care as long as it's since the beginning of time. Really in the twincities, we had one of the nurses at Alina that, unfortunately, was killedby a gunmen right, and so that was not coved related. However, we want to makesure that she is supported and her stories are told and we're celebratingher life and then with that, we want to make sure that we're wrapping our armsaround the community and giving them resources if they need that for mentalhealth or financial or grants for kids who might need something. And so wewant to make sure that we're providing for this community as well. In that way,yeah- and I think you I'm right- you told me so- The the you know, obviouslywith all permissions and things that are giving necessary. The stories aregoing to try to post on the website and let people come and hear about thesestories and or celebrate those people who have done heroes duty as we like tocall it right or they've, been, I say: Superhero Super Heroes without superpowers, but you know so they're just getting it done day in a day out. Thatwill be part of the platform as well current and we're putting that on ourlike instar and different other social media. Now and you can go on there andyou can actually submit stories now that we can post and it's just someonewho has gone above and beyond right if you want to tell we had a mom, submit astory for her daughter recently, and that was pretty amazing, and so we wantto make sure that people have a voice to tell their stories great. So let'stalk a little bit more about the advocacy so and help me understand andforgive my naivete, but is this legislative changes? In other words,are you guys pursuing legal changes, changes to the law, or is it mostlypolicy change like? Are you going to a state and saying hey, you know to thestate board and saying hey. We think you have to change the following thingsand here's. Why we'd like you to change the following thing: here's why howmuch of it becomes legislative and how much of it is policy? That's a greatquestion, so I have tried to make policy changes on a local level forquite a long time with some of these issues and with gender equity issuesand safeguarding people. Who've been discriminated against or bull laterthings I had gone to the a MC which is the medical college, governance rightand said: Can we do these things and they said? Well, we don't have thepower to mandate this locally, and so that's what inspired me to say. Yep,you know what I'm going to start networking with different politiciansand congress members and we're going to take it to Congress, and so there's abill that Tim cane introduced this summer and it's called the Breen Bill,and it's named after Dr Laura Breen, who is one of the physicians thatcommitted suicide in New York and her family started a foundation, and sothey have helped. You know become a motor for some of this change and herbrother's. A phenomenal individual saw him talk yesterday, we'll be meetinglater this week and so we're going to team up with them, as well as otherorganizations nationally, the American Medical Women's association well beingtrusted yellow, ribbon suicide prevention. All these organizations, wehave a goal in mind: that's basically to prevent, burn out depression,anxiety and suicide ultimately of our medical community, and so the goal isto make sure that this legislation is one past to. If we can make criticaldundas to this that are going to have more tangible, realistic effects. Ithink that's really important as well, and so there are things that we wouldlike to add to the bill to make sure that it has as much impact as possible,so we're trying to use our platform to create changes that are going to impacteverybody wow so and I'm sure it's not necessarily and easier or faster path,because getting legislation put through this no small task and you and takestons of time and effort and energy. But is the idea if we can get thelegislation pushed through, then the policies have to change yeah, becausewe want to mandate different things to...

...the states right. So if we have beentrying to advocate for physician application or licensing applicationsto change for, however long we've had Nami and the APA writing letters to thestate boards and that has never changed, then we need to go beyond that. We needto take it to a higher level so that we can mandate these changes, because ifwe can't get help, you know the easy, simple, the simpler way than I'm happywith working with people in Congress to try to make real changes that are goingto passibly impact everybody right, because if you can't get it done on afederal level, then you're now now you're down to the state by state basis,which is a Herculean lift, because you got to do it fifty times exactly Yep.Well, so it sounds like you guys, and when did you start this? So I know likeI said it's a passion project, but when did when did this start for you guys?Because it sounds like you've made a lot of progress in a short period oftime. I think I know when you- and I spoke a few months back. You were likewell, the web site's not up yet, and all that sort of stuff and overnight itfelt like it was up and you were ready to go so I know you don't waste anytime, but so how long have you started and how is the progress? Obviously,progress has been good yeah I mean technically. I think it was middle ofJanuary so January, thirteenth of the se year as when we came together. Ofcourse, I had been active in advocacy work before then, so I had a lot of theconnections put together, which was fortunate, and I took an active role in many otherthings associated with Covin, so I had colleagues that were willing to hell,but patient care heros was January of this year. Okay, so that's amazing,because I amount of progress as people will see that you've made and even justhearing you talk about it you're on the fat. The fast track with it does thefact that you've got the website and the name and things like that. Do youfind that that's helping legitimize it when you're talking to people versus it?Being Dr Stacker's idea yeah I mean that is helpful, absolutely and I have been fortunate to meet people fromdifferent organizations that I've become involved with and have gotleadership rules with, and so that has, I think, legitimized me a little bit aswell and so having a new leadership roll with Ama and being on a board forMental Health Advocacy. That's all really helped me kind of get into thisspace so that when people talk to me, they don't think I'm just like a randomperson coming at them. For for things that I need well, it's amazing rightjust to have the website does do that, because yeah, because I mean we allhave things that were passionate about, but but to create. A movement is awhole different effort and energy that takes that takes behind it, so cast alittle vision for the listeners in terms of what would you like to seethis be what are some of your short term goals for the platform? What wouldsuccess? Look like you know if you said hey by you know this time next year oror in six months, we'd love to really have this or see this moving. What aresome of the goals that you'll be shooting for with the organization? Andwhere do you think it's going? You know short term. I really want to justeducate people on the issues. I think that even physicians aren't aware ofphysician suicide issues and we really got rocked in our community with acouple different suicides and just talking to one of my colleagues thismorning about it. He knew one of the women who had committed suicide and heactually was unaware of the significant rates that that we had and I think,making sure that the community is aware of what's going on, and you know reallyeducating people who have power to make change and that's why. I think it'sreally important for politicians to be aware of what goes on in the medicalcommunity, because it's not just the health care system is not just thebusiness of medicine. It's not that it's were people that are running theshow here and we need to make sure that we're protecting those people, and so Ithink that educating people is my one of my big goals. The number twogoal for the short term is making sure...

...people know we exist in that they're,not alone, because I don't want someone to get to that place where they feellike suicide is their option that that's what they need to do, becausethey just can't go on any more. I want to make sure that that person has anumber and resources in a community that they can reach out to and theyneed help. So those are my my short term goals, because I don't wantsomeone to feel alone in those moments and that's it makes me say. I just eventhink that someone could be in that situation. Aside from that, obviouslygrowing our resources right, because we are able to offer resources to themedical community. I want to make sure that we can continue to do so, and sowe're going to need to continue to work with different national organizationsand sponsor ships with that we grow and then can have more impact on makinglegislative changes as well so really trying to grow this to provide theresources needed for our community is important for me, and I know all thepeople that I'm working on this project with but long term. I would love tolook at like more wellness stuff too right, I mean if you're looking at yeswe're triage this. We want to look up physician suicide, anxiety anddepression, but why don't we look at overall physical wellness as well asemotional mental wellness for people, and I would love to team up with likeweight, watchers or other organizations that can help us get resources to themedical community as well, because a lot of people cannot afford to takecare of themselves the way that they should be. You know yeah. Well, I'vehave to get you connected with Dr Jonathan Rip out of Mount Si and I Idon't know if you had a chance to listen to that episode that went on gFebruary, but he's the cheap wellness officer when he launched. I think hesaid he was the second or third chief wellness officer in the whole country,and you know now, there's many many more and how many of these big healthcare systems are continuing to see the value of preventing Dr Burn out andwell the benefits of that so ill to get you connected. I think he would loveyour your guy's cause and everything that you're trying to do so. Let's talkabout a little bit Mental Health Inn terms of you know. I've heard somedifferent things and I always want to be careful about my numbers or puttingnumbers out there because they're. Never I don't necessarily always havethem substantiated, and you know there's always different opinions, butthere's a lot written about that we're going to we're about to enter into anunprecedented period of time of you know mental illness and mental fatigue,and a lot of need that's going to hit a system, that's already under staffedand under resource. What are you seeing and what are you projecting that someof that is going to be like coming out of the pandemic yeah, I mean I kind oflook at it like a snowball, rolling down hill, you know, and so we're kindof it's building momentum. It's getting bigger. I think that people who arekind of barely hanging on through the pandemic are now starting to reach theend of their coping mechanisms, and so we're definitely seeing more anxietyand depression. We're seeing people struggle with feeling, isolated anddisconnected, and a lot of that has to do with you know, of course, what wehad to do, which is isolated during a pandemic, and my worry is when you getto a certain point: you don't seek resources or help or communicate you.You kind of get into the dark place and then, ultimately we worry about suicide,so we definitely see more people struggling with those things. At thispoint you know it's again same thing. One of the other things we've heard isand am wondering whether you're seeing this to is physicians or or really health careworkers, not wanting to admit that they're, not feeling good or the kindof I'm okay and the mental, even just the social or the stigma of I've got amental illness or I'm not I'm feeling depressed. But I don't want to tellanybody, so I just keep saying I'm. Okay and again I go back to just MountSian I and they you know, one of the things they've found is by using theword resiliency training they're, getting people to open up more. Haveyou guys seen any of those sorts of things or are you guys taking any someof the different approaches to get some of the you know the stigmas of thestigmas. You know they're there,...

...whether we like them or not. So how dowe work around those yeah? I think we're as lions training is a reallygood buzz word for us, especially physicians, because I think,unfortunately, a lot of us are resistant to seeking care, because Ikind of like the people who give Carshun need to have care. We're finelike, of course we're fine were the ones that are prescribing medicationand we're taking care of people, and you get to a point where all of asudden you're like. Oh I'm, not fine, but there's embarrassment like you're,not tough enough you're, not you don't have the mental stamina. You can'tfight this off like, and I think that that's really true- and I know a lot ofmy friends in the military, because I work with some military people. Theyalmost have the same thing like it's almost like the sin to acknowledge thatyou need help and I think if we can break that stigma by using, if it isbuzz words that are not depression and it's more okay, resiny as a training orwellness or whatever, then we need to do that. But bottom line is, physicians still appearto be pretty resistant to wellness or resiliency or any of that stuff,because I think that people are so overwhelmed with everything that'sgoing on in their life, whether it's kids and work and Ovid and everythingelse. They can't even think to add one more thing: if it's good for them, itstill does not fit on the priority, lest, unfortunately, yeah with. What'sthe expression, shoemaker son has no shoes right, you know the Times just sobusy practicing that we forget to take care of ourselves, so yep, I'm surewe're dealing with that for sure. So as we're kind of coming around the to ourtime. What are you guys doing for funding? Are You bootstrap Ping, thisyourself or you? Do you have some donations? Do you have donors? What'sthe thought there? What's the fundraising ideas, and you know how doyou accelerate this? So we have been really fortunate enough to be connectedwith organizations that are donating time and resources, and so, if you needhelp you can get on our site, we can connect you up directly with some ofthese individuals, which has been fabulous. We are obviously looking formore sponsorship because we just are partner ing with the Recto pomatiasthat have a really cool AI technology, to work with substance, abuse anddepression, so that people who are resistant in talking to an individualone on one and a counseling can at to am go on these resources and get helpwithout needing to commit to you know having the conversation with anotherhuman which, for some people is really important right and so we're partneringwith them. But of course none of the stuff is free, and so we do needsponsorship and whoever wants to be involved. We always love resources indifferent things that people want to volunteer their time as well, so we'rejust kind of doing a grass roots movement, we're piecing things together.So what we can get people the things that they need so again we'll put thewebsite on our website when the podcast goes live and for those who want tolearn more information. I Know Kelly your adva linked in poster, so peoplecan follow you on Linkin and continue to learn more and social media you'vebecome quite proficient at, but also they can obviously learn more by goingto patient care heroes. You know the other thing too. I just kind of struckme. I was thinking that being in the twin cities- and we've heard this withsome of our other guests, but you know in the midst of this whole pandemic. Wealso have a racial divide going on and you guys are living right in the in themiddle of it. With the George Floyd situation, I always want to be careful,sometimes to date the podcast, but I believe the trial is starting today.Sometimes we get we don't post the PODCAST for thirty days, but obviouslytoday is a bit of a milestone day in that process. How have you seen or feltsome of that has been an added stress point to some of the people that youguys are working with, or has it been? You know, I think that, to a largeextent, it has opened people's eyes to the reality that we are not perfect andwe have a long way to go with some of these issues, and I think that it hasactually benefited us, especially in...

...the twin cities, to make us more awarethat we need to be advocates for everyone, and you know I think, assomeone who grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Minnesota, I was unaware ofsome of the health care disparities. I kind of was in denial that in Minnesotawe had as much as we did. My kind of thought all was those other studentsright. It was the other people, it was the other institutions, and so itreally changed my perspective and open my eyesto needing to be on the lookout for these things and to help wherever I can,and I think that we've done a really good job trying to advocate forvaccinations and to have an equitable distribution and we're going to improvein this area going forward. But it definitely has added stress, because wewant to make sure that everyone's safe and, of course, for my colleagues thatare working around where George Floyd was murdered and the hospitals and thatarea. Of course it's been stressful. Of course, there's been a lot of issuesdown there because of the conflicts, and we want to make sure that everyonestays safe and that's been an extra burden for some of them is now yeah.Well, hopefully, we can continue to have igiea an article, and I think it'sso true: We've lost the art of civil discourse. We can't disagree civilly any more.It's all become hostile towards each other. So one of my prayers is that wecan continue to come back to a place of civil discourse where Ted and DrStrecker can talk and not agree, but be okay with that right. You know, I meanthat's a that's a it's. Unfortunately, unfortunately, we feel like it's, Ifeel like. At times it's become a bit of a lost art yeah I mean I'm sure whenI think about his. When I was in high school watching debates, it was totallya different life. I mean it feels like we are in a time. Work like sixty yearshave gone by, but it really has not been that long. It's really unfortunatebecause everyone empowers everybody else. Like your perspective, educatesme on what I need to know and vice versa, and so I think, if we can figureout a way to get back to that, that's really important to yeah for sure. Aswe wrap up, I got two last things one. How can our listeners help you knowgoing to the website registering volunteering donating what else? If youwant to share stories, that's really helpful to because we want to make surethat we're recognizing people who have been heroes in their community. So ifyou want to share stories of a loved one or a friend, we have to grit thatas well. So we close every episode with the famous question which is who's yourhero, so my hero is justice, ruth bad or Gens Bard, and it's because shereally was a strong woman's rights advocate and she really helped us getto where we're at in terms of being involved in all of the areas we are,and I really appreciate that- and I know that we all want to carry on hertradition, to make sure that women are in leadership and can help make goodchanges going forward. Yeah. She really is a Modern Day, women advocacy. I know formany years, looking back, our kids and our children's kids will look back athistory and I'm sure she will continue to remain and and rightfully so and hericonic role of all the work that she did and what she represented. So, Ithink that's a great choice. If I do say, if you don't mind me, sharingthat's a great one, Dr Stacker thanks so much for your time.Thank you for all the work. You're doing I know it's a it's a pat, it's apassion job. These things usually are for the patient care heroes that you'reworking with. We appreciate your heart. We appreciate all your service. That isalso needs to be said, and we just thank you for being one of the manyheroes of health care and joining us on the podcast ing. So much for having me,I appreciate that you've been listening to heroes ofhealth care for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of health care, podcast com.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (27)