Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 1 month ago

Journey in Courage: Dealing with Auto-Immune Disease w/ Jeremy Paredes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Right before the height of the pandemic, Jeremy Paredes’s eczema, an auto-immune disease, became so severe that he was rushed to the ER in Septic Shock. A chronic skin condition that Jeremy grew up with became so unbearable that he felt as though there was no hope for him to get better.

Although Jeremy’s journey with eczema still continues, he is able to manage it better thanks to the help of some Heroes of Healthcare who saved his life.

In today’s episode, we speak to Jeremy Paredes, Student at Georgia Tech and Filmmaker, who agreed to come on the show to share his experience with eczema while juggling school, sports, and his passion for film.

Join us as we discuss:

To hear this interview and more like it, follow Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

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You were listening to heroes of healthcare, the podcast that highlights bold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the heroes of healthcare podcast. I'm your host, Ted Wayne. Today I'm joined by Jeremy paradies. Jeremy is a bright young man and a freshman at Georgia Tech University. Jeremy's passionate about sports filmmaking and as part of the Georgia tech football creative media team, Jeremy takes photos and films of the football practices games and creates content for various media platforms. One of the biggest challenges Jeremy has had has been his skin. Jeremy's a severe skin condition called Eggzema and autoimmune disease that he's had since birth, and I just thought it was going to be great to have him on the show today to talk about his journey. It's been a tough one for a young man through grammar school and high school dealing with this unknown thing, and I just thought was a powerful story and to hear about the clinicians and how they played such an important role in his comeback and also how compelling story. His family was really such an unbelievable support system. So it's my pleasure to welcome Jeremy Paradies to the heroes of healthcare. Thank you for having me. It is an honor. I'm really excited to share my story and share about the people in the healthier industry who have positively affected me. Well. Well, I can't wait to get into that. So, Jeremy, before we start, why don't you just tell everybody a little bit about Jeremy Par s? Where you are today, what's going on you? You are a young, dynamic young man and I just think we would be great for the for the folks, to hear a little bit more about you. Yes, sir, of course. I am a rising sophomore at Georgia Tech. I'm studying communications and media and I currently do videos and photos for Georgia tech football team, as well as other Georgia Tech Athletic Sports, and I'm very passionate about both sports and videography. So combining my two passions together into filmmaking is something I love to do and very passionate about, and I had a great opportunity this past winter to work for NBC sports during the Beijing Winter Olympics, and that was a great opportunity as well. And through all of this, I have a severe skin condition called Egma, which is where my story starts. I've struggled with Sevir Exthema all my life and today I'm living my best life, but it's been quite the journey from which I've learned a lot about myself and I want to share my story with others in hope of helping people who struggle with a similar condition or situation that I was in. Yeah, well, it kind of a couples a a Gudon of exciting. It's great for someone so young to have a passion like you do with the videography and being able to roll it into sports and doing it at such a high level with the Georgia that football program and also the the opportunity with the Olympics. Telp just...

...use real quick a little bit about the Olympics thing. How that that's a unique opportunity, I'm sure, and who you work with, NBC, tell me what we what we doing on that project? Yes, sir, so everything that we brought in we were working out of Stanford, Connecticut at NBC Sports. Headquarters and the Beijing whins Olympics was in China, so we would actually have to be working on China hours, which was from ten pm to ten AH. Yeah, twelve hours happen. Was that right? Yeah, exactly. It was crazy, but it was an amazing experience being able to work with so many different people in the industry. A lot of the group I was working with as a digital production assistant were people who are already out of college working in the industry or people who were seniors in college about to jump into the real world of work, and so being able to talk to those people and learn from them and hear about their experience was priceless. And what we did for NBC sports and during the Olympics was we would watch all the live feeds and the different clips that they would send in from Beijing. We would watch through them, cut them up and then send those out to our editors and producers to post on Social Media, advertising, graphics, all of the above, any digital concept. That's what we worked on. Wow, was it very fast and furious? It was an intense environment, or are we it? Was it so? You know, sometimes ebbs and flow. You'd set around and wait a while and then all sudden it would all come in. How what kind of environment was it? It was a fast paced environment. We worked for three weeks straight, no breaks during that whole Olympics time, and working twelve hours a day on the opposite side of the moon where it's ten at pm to tend hand was a totally different experience, but it was incredible in something that I would love to do again if the opportunity presented itself. Yeah, well, something tells me guy like you, you're gonna have lots of opportunity. So that's great. I can't imagine. That's great. I'm a big winter Olympics fan. As a young man, I went up to the eighty Olympics and I was able to I was actually at the miracle on ice game as a sixteen year old young man when the hot USA hockey team won the gold medal. So I'm a big Olympics fan, so I'm nvus. You got that opportunity. That's amazing. So let's go back and let's talk about this. If I'm right, Eggsim is an autoimmune disease and an autumn immune situation, and why don't you take the listeners back through a little bit you know. When did it first start to show itself and what is that? You know? What is that challenging journey been? Yes, sir, of course I've had Eggsma, also known as a topic Germatitis, since I was a baby and when I was younger, kids would come up to me and ask if I had skin cancer or if my eggma was contagious. My eggs will be read dry, cracked, patchy, rashy, and I was afraid to show my skin in public and I felt and look different and hated being stared at and being judged by other people, and so I would try to hide my skin as much as possible by wearing long pants, wearing long sleeves, even if it was during summer. I...

...never wanted to be looked at different and to me that just hurt inside when people would judge be based off my skin. And so, instead of getting better as I got older, my Eggsma got worse and hit the lows and low as my junior year of high school, January, February two thousand and twenty, my Exima was so severe it got to the point where I couldn't do the things that I love to do anymore. My skin was so cracked, dry red all over and it caused immense pain all the time. I was barely able to walk, couldn't focus in class or go to school. I had to stop playing sports and couldn't hang out with friends, and I was on so many different rounds of medication and steroids and creams to the point where my body would react to flare up and any medication we tried to help with Magsima just worsened it even more. And so my eggs moll was, of course, a physical was physically giving me extreme pain, but dealing with my eggsma brought a mental and emotional toll daily. It felt like it was a never ending cycle of pain, depression and I didn't have the world to live it felt like there's no solution for my egg wally get better, as it was only getting worse, and I just felt hopeless in this whole situation. Yeah, that was the word you just said, hopeless. That was that's what struck me, I said, I'm sure. It just started to feel like it was. You know, I can't win, I can't get out of this situation, and there's there's there's no solution. Were there any things that you found during this time. That was it would would die and impact it. Would stress of school impact it, you know, with there certain things or was there anything you learned pattern wise that would cause a flare up per se or maybe make it worse or would maybe tamper it back down again? Yes, so I have many food and environmental allergies and having to stay on the strict diet. There was a few weeks I would just eat rice and chicken three three times a day because there would be so many foods and allergies that could flare out my Eggsima. And another thing that would flare my Eggsma is, like you mentioned, stress, especially being in high school, Sophomore junior year. More stress in high school, the GEP, the gpas, is everything right that colleges look for to say t's right, qualified for the school's Yep, Yep. So trying to keep my grades up, my extra curriculose up and trying to enjoy being a kid in high school. It was really hard when my eggsimo would always be itchy and irritating every day and it would be super hard to sleep at night because I'd be staying up scratching and not getting enough sleep. So having those obstacles every day was really hard to deal with. And when I was growing up, there was also routine things that people without eggs moo would almost take for granted, such as showering sleepovers. When I would shower, it wouldn't just be a hop in the shower, hop out and we done. It would be when I shower, I have to make sure that I put my moisturizers and Lotion on after I shower, after wait for them to dry and soak into my skin before I can even put clothes on. And then for sleepovers, trying to sleep...

...at other people's houses, I would always get super stressed because I would have to think, okay, if I were to sleep over and shower, when would I put my lotions on? I don't want to scratch when I'm sleeping over there at night, and then when I wake up in the morning I would have to put lotions on again. It was a whole whole ordeal of having to maintain my eggs Amin my skin and it was something that I was always thinking about, where in things that some people may take for granted or second nature, to shower and sleep right, something that I always stressed about because the EXEMA affected that part of my lifestyle. Yeah, yeah, and you know I mean you're not so far removed from it. But high school's a tough age. You know, Middle School and high school are tough ages and I'm sure there were times when you had you, I should say probably, you knew who your friends were and maybe sometimes, unfortunately, who your friends weren't. Did you? When? Did you feel you know, I don't want to Oh, I don't want to over fit, but did you ever feel a sense of bullying as a cause stuff as a result of it, or did you get more maybe empathy or sympathy from some of your schoolmates? Definitely sympathy as I got into Middle School in high school. I think as people get older they tend to understand that some people have off schools that it really hard to overcome, and some things they can control. I think an elementary school, when kids would call my skin skin cancer or asked if I was contagious, they were in doing it necessarily out of bullying or being mean, but they were just curious and being so young and they didn't really have a filter what they should say what they shouldn't say. But regardless of whether they meant to be hurtful or not. When I was younger, I never had a mental wall or something to tell me, hey, like, they don't mean it this way. I took it all too heart so, being so young and hearing these remarks about my skin, I was really hurt and I wanted to block all of it out. I wanted to hide my skin as much as possible. Sure, so when was it where it really got to that most acute state? Where you were? I think you said it was in high school, but where you were home and you were trying to get your grades together, but and you felt that feeling of hopelessness and and and D or, you know, and order, unfortunately, depression. Yes, sir, this was my junior year of high school. So two thousand and twenty, around January, February two thousand and twenty was where I was stuck at home. Couldn't go out, couldn't could barely even move. My body was just stuck on the couch. Skin was in a horrible state, could not bend my arms or legs because of my egg in love being there and just be bleeding the whole time. I remember specifically February Fourteen, two thousand and twenty. That was the day that my mom took me into see my pediatrition Dr Kelly. My mom was really his she was extremely concerned about my wellbeing and I just did not look okay at all, and Dr Kelly is one of my biggest heroes. What she saw me, she recognized...

...the signs and I was in Sepsis already. She took my bidos and they were extremely low and she immediately called an ambulance and got me to the hospital and while I was in the yard trauma room, an amazing group of nurses and doctors worked for around two hours to try and stabilize me. I was then moved to the icee you, where I stayed for six days. My parents were told that night by the nurse and I see that if I wasn't brought in that night that there was a high chance I would have died. Wow. Yeah, you know, I think sometimes people think of Eggzema, as you know, as a little rash on my arm and you see the the commercials that says, you know, get this, get this, you know cream or that cream and it'll help your egmone. I don't think people understand the depth of what that is. That it is an autoimmune disease, right, it is something you were born with and it is something that you're you will live with, right for the rest of your life, and there's lots of different treatments that work, but not every treatment works for everybody. But obviously we've got so severe that sepsis. was now starting to think. So your body was going into shock because it was in an in in an entire infected state. Is that right? Is that how I understand my understand that right? Yes, sir. It's very interesting because I knew that my ex moo very severe, but I had no idea my body was in such bad shape and I didn't realize that because of the endless cycles of scratching and my skin being broken because my Egsima, that infection did that getting too my blood stream. Yeah, yeah, so so you're in, I see you for six days and medical staff get you stabilized, right, and then did you do from there? Were you able to go home? And so let's talk about more about your heroes, Dr Kelly, you talked about and then now the staff in the hospital who are attending to you, and I know from our conversation you talked about that. There was. There was not only just a physical component to them, but there was a it sounds like there was also a real emotional component to their care as well. Yes, or not only did they take amazing care both me and my family while we were in icee you for the next six days, but they were also they're keeping it light, keeping the mood happy and making sure that anything we needed that there was cared for. I really felt that the nurses at chose your health care Atlanta really care for the will being of their patients. And me being in the ICEE you, it's not the happiest place you would think of. I would say Disney world is definitely more happy to do I see you, but more just about any place for sure, but the nurses there, maybe I see you, feel safe, feel comfortable, and it was almost a turning point in my journey with my eggs more to where I could set foot in a positive light and look forward to the next day that was going to come. Wow, and can you remember anything? And what was was there any one event or one person or one thing? And maybe it was your...

...parents or somebody who said something to you that was the a little bit of maybe at the turning point or the thing that you remember that said, Hey, this isn't as hopeless or this is how I'm going to have to come to terms with this. Yes, sir, I would say it is the last day that I see you. When I was leaving, my parents were there with me. The nurse, nurse Mason, who was there the first day I was there, was also there the last day I was there and he was there to send me off on my way back home. I think what got me through the six days and I see you were my family and friends the immense support that I had. There were visitors every day, people bringing me balloons, cards, gives, you name it. We would make tick tock dances, play Jana. Everyone came to visit kept the mood like, kept the mood positive and they kept my spirits up, which was the most important thing. Right and my mom was there the whole time. My brother and dad came to see me and spend time with me every day, and having such a strong support system showed me that I was not alone in my fight with eggs mood. I had so many people who loved and cared for me and wanted to see me get better. I think being able to have a strong support group around you can help you have a better positive outlook on your situation and have people to lean on and you can rely on. Yeah, so it so. It's really right. It's the mental and emotional part. It is a mind, body and spirit situation, right, you know, it's not just the physical part. Obviously the medical staff, the doctors and the nurses and everybody were helping you get physically better, but what helped that also was that emotionally you felt safe as well. Yes, for sure. I think since eggsm is such a physical it's a skin condition, not many people would think how I was affected emotionally, emotionally and mentally, but it was really hard to find that hope, that positive light at the end of the tunnel, because I was suffering so much because of my eggs moom. It was really helpful that the nurse is and the doctors would always show their support, because having their support that that I could focus on myself and know that there will be hope, there will be another day that I'll be able to live and look forward to. Know I love that. The you know, and obviously, as you talked about earlier, I just want, you know, listeners, to you know, recognize that. You Know Georgia Institute of Technology is not an easy school to get into and you know you were dealing with this as you were Gene Junior Act, sat time, GPA, as you said earlier, important and everything. And so you know, in spite of all this, I think it continues to speak to what a bright young future you have is that you were able to overcome this medical situation, the depression situation and all that and still maintain your grades in a situation that qualified you to enter into Georgia tech and to get you into the thing that you really love. Of I know you produced a video, I...

...guess when you were what? Did you produce that video about your situation, your story, when you were in high school, or was that I went after you gray, after you graduated, because I know we'll post it on the website for people to watch it. It's a it's a very powerful piece that you produced about your story. But when did that come out? How did that come about and when did that start? Yes, sir, I produced a short documentary called the egg semo Warrior documentary. A few of my really good friends who do video helped me with this and we posted it a year after I was admitted into the hospital. So February fourteen, two thousand and twenty one. This was kind of the one year anniversary, reflecting on everything that had happened in the past two years and wrapping it all up in a video and being able to share it two platforms where people who have Eggsamore, people who know who have eggzemo could see it and be inspired and moved by the video. It was a really good way for me to start talking and sharing about my story. And it was made in high school. has made my senior year of High School, when the college applications are all out. It was. It was a crazy time, but I just remember how happy I was to finally share my story with the rest of the world, with my friends who may not have fully known or people who I did not know, but we're positively affected by the video and in let's not forget that. You know, I remembered, I realize, when you were talking about how this you know, the kind of the dark days of February fourteen. Right, you're about we were about thirty days out from going into a full pandemic. So this whole on top of all of this, will start going into the whole covid thing hot. Did that impact negatively positively? Did that have any change to you know what you're maybe some of your recovery time or any of that as you guys got as you got into the summer of two thousand and twenty. What are your recollections around that? Yes, so I got released from the hospital mid February two thousand and twenty and covid hit that March right. So it was only a few weeks in between when I got home versus when the quarantine pandemic started. And of course covid was not good for the world, for people who got sick, who passed away because of it, but for me the quarantine was a time to be able to reset, to take a step back from school and sports and just be able to focus on myself. During January and February of that year I was already at home, I couldn't go to school and I was desperately trying to catch up on all my work virtually before anyone did virtual school. So you get a little you got a little preview, I think, a little preview. So then in March, when the pandemic hit and everyone was forced to go to live in their homes, to do school from home. Sports were all canceled and it almost seemed like everyone was at the same stepping stone as me. Everyone was on square one. Yeah, I wasn't the only one having to do school from home and trying to manage my Exima. Everyone was home doing their own thing. So it gave me word time to just stay home,...

...focus on the eggs and more focus on my well being and get back to where I am today, which is being a hundred percent me. Yeah, I love that. And you know, I guess in a sense it also gave your friends taste of what you were going through it, right, you know, they were sitting there gone. Probably some of them are like, wow, I wish I could do school from home and not have to come in here every day. And they were, you know, and you're sitting there going, I would rather be in school and with all of you guys. Right, grass is always greener on the other side. But yeah, when that's so, I guess when they all got sent home and they had to do virtual class, they said, okay, Jeremy, we know, we know what you've been doing, for sure. Yeah, well, and and and it sounds like to you what you said. I just want to, you know, touch on it. But it sounds like it also gave you a chance to continue to heal. Yes, it did. It was. I was able to stay home and completely focus on the Eggsma and we actually started a new medication during quarantine called you pis in, which is a bibly injectable, and that tremendously. Thankfully, it really helped better my Eggsma to about seventy, seventy five percent better, to the point where today I'm still on do pics and it helps me manage my eggs am a really well. Good. that. Well, that's that. That's great. You know the piece of you know, you know the quarantine and the and the time to kind of heal. Talk a little bit about a little bit more about that. I guess. Did I guess it? I guess the word I was trying to find earlier, but it's almost foamo. Right. It probably relieved a little of that Foamo that when you were or home and everybody's at school and you want to be at school and being with your friends and go and do what high school kids do. Now that some of that probably got taken away because nobody was doing it. Yes, there definitely, I think staying home that January, February and unable to play soccer. We were in the middle over a high school season. We were about to go into playoffs before covid hit. Just being able to go to school and making videos every day and video class, being able to hang out with my friends. I missed being able to go to the soccer games and this being able to go to other sports, basketball, baseball. I think just not having the ability to go and hang out with people was I was missing something in my social life. I was missing something that I wasn't able to go be a regular kid anymore. And then so when covid hit, I mean everyone was home and people started to hang out outside and at that point bags most getting a lot better and it was recovering from a hospital stay, and so I really had a chance to reset myself. That's great. That's great. Well, so, some write some people. For some people covid was a was obviously a terrible, as you said earlier, experience, but obviously for you there was a bit of a silver lining behind it and it gave you a chance to hit the reset button. So so you so you've so you finished, the finished school, you graduate and then you move into Georgia Tech. How it and sounds and it sounds like the medication to do pick set is having its effect. How it your freshman year and how is your first year and...

...how and how are you feeling as you got your one behind you? Freshman Year of Georgia Tech was awesome. It's it was completely different experience from high school, just being able to meet so many different kids, whether it's from inner city kids, south Georgia, kids from Venezuela, India, you name it, from all over the world coming to Georgia techa study. That was really cool to have such a diverse background and being able to live in the city of Atlanta. You have the whole city at your disposal, as well as Georgia tech campus and campus life. So I think it was very unique to be able to be in college at Georgia Tech. And managing my skin was something else I really stressed about, but having friends that understood what my skin was, having family nearby to be able to help me bring me any medication or to do Pisa shot that I needed. I think it was a good experience for me to be independent, to mature and to figure out how I wanted to take care of my skin, because the Eggema is not going away anytime soon. It's always going to be a part of WHO I am right but it's about how do I manage my Exima and how am I going to keep it at a minimum while still being able to enjoy the rest of my life? Well, I know, and I went to college my diet was terrible and so and how has that been? So obviously since, as you said, food and environmental aspects are really important. And there you are colledge and you got the caffeteria and you got all the other different temptations. How has that been? Have you been able to manage that? Well, for the most part it's been pretty manageable. At the dining halls have their own allergy free section and then being with Georgia tech football and doing the videos for them, I had access to their athletic dining hall in the fall and so being able to have what the athletes are eating were that's a good friensh is great. It was wonderful. The the people running the athletic dining hall knew my name, knew my allergies, and so they're very accommodating of all my food allergies, which is really nice. Great. So tell the listeners. Let's shift a little bit and and you know, you know. Obviously thank you for sharing your story and I'm sure at times it's hard and it's different when you're going through it. You know, there's no doubt. I you know. I not having that. I can't say I know what it's like for you to go through it because I I don't. So so I appreciate your vulnerability and opening up to us so that. But tell the listeners real quick. So what is video production for? You know, a Division One Football Program ACC like Georgia tech is. What is your what is your week like? What's your day like? What are some of your assignments and what some of the work that you're doing for them? Yes, sir, during the fall season of college football I am working basically every day, Monday through Thursday, we will have practice every morning that I'll go shoot pictures and videos that I'll then come back from practice and edit those photos, put a workout practice video together to post on our Georgia tech football social media is to...

...get the pictures to are athletes for them to post MMM and so throughout the whole week I'm working on different content building up to Saturday, which is Game Day, and on away trips we would travel Friday, get their Saturday, return home Sunday. For Home Games we would have a whole day set out for Saturday. The Saturdays on the flats in Bobby Dodd Stadium where something I can never imagine. It was unreal. It was an amazing experience. But being able to film on the sidelines at Football Games for Georgia tech was amazing and being able to make content out of that. Taking pictures at the Games, taking videos of the game, making height videos and promotional videos and players for athletes throughout the season was something I love to do and be able to highlight our team and our athletes on the Georgie Tech football page. That sounds like a full time job. It was, it seemed like so. And so how do you balance your school work? Right, Oh, don't forget. You go into class and you're taking I assume you're taking a full course load and George Sels and Georgia texts. No easy, you know play. So so how do you balance the time? You know, it sounds like you're there early with the practices and you're you know, when you just describe to me sounds like well, that's that's forty or fifty hours a week and, oh, by the way, I got to get some school and it was a lot to balance and definitely coming in as a freshman my first semester in the fall, I didn't quite understand how college works. So I would be working every day, going to class every day, doing homework on the weekends on the plane right back from wherever we played that Saturday. So you're traveling with the team to you're not just doing you're not just doing it in on the campus, you're traveling with them on our way games. Yes, sir, we have a unfortunate enough to be able to ride the charter plane that the football team takes to the Games back, which is awesome, and we were from Notre Dame in to Miami. We traveled everywhere for away games. But having a Georgia tech course load with working forty plus hours a week was a lot and trying to balance that obviously would develop stress. But I think after being through a season of football I can look back at it and see where I need to change for next year. Good, but I would not change anything about it because it was just such an amazing experience being able to have that opportunity and I want to run with the opportunity to keep going with what we're doing next year. Yeah, that's great. Well, and, as it sounds like the answered that I was going to say. So, did it cause extra stress? Did you find flare ups of it as a result of it, and how did you manage that? Yes, I did have flay ups to school. Obviously college is something you can't fully control. It's something where you have to take as it goes. Yeah, but the stress in first semester was and thence having to balance their course work with football. But I know, having a prior experience to it, I can look back and be like hey, I don't want to eggs are getting to where wasn't two thousand and twenty rows and hospital. So I'm going to do...

...everything I can, whether that's keeping a clean diet or sleeping eight hours a day if I can, limiting the scratching, making sure that I'm putting my motions on and then always going back to the doctors and my carrot seeing for my skin to make sure that everything I'm doing is right from EGGSMA and that I'm helping my Egsma as much as possible. MMM, that's awesome. Well, as we kind of wrap up here, Jeremy, it's obvious that, you know, you you ran into some heroes and you and obviously, with your steps the situation, we can we can say they saved your life and and and not only had a, you know, a physical, as we said, impact on you, had a mental impact and then your support system, family and friends and everything really kind of carried you through this. So I you know, I love. That's what we love to do here on the show is to highlight those medical people who are really stepping up and doing things that sometimes we don't expect or we don't realize. So we always want to celebrate them, but we also usually, at the end of it, were always I kind of my I love is like love to ask a question. So when you think now, who's your who's your hero? Who is the person that you think about and you're like, okay, that that that, that person's my hero. Right now, at the stage of my life, I would not have gotten through my journey with eggs Moo and still today with my mom, my dad, my brother and my family. They were there, I mean when I was a baby having eggs in the stretching and this lead to now we're seventy, seventy five percent better, and they've been through everything. They went. They were at the hospital with me every day. They were there the nights I wouldn't be able to sleep and I was bleeding and crying. They were there when I was screaming in the shower because my skin was hurting so much. They were. They've always been there for me and they've always been the biggest support system that I've had, from my mom taking me to all the appointments, to my dad crying in the doctor's office because there was nothing for me and he felt awful and wanted to help me the best I can, and my brother, who's my builts and best friend, who was there for me every step of the way, always having that back in school, in sports, in my eggs, in my journey. I wouldn't be here without their tremendous support. So my family is definitely one of my biggest heroes. I mentioned Dr Kelly, my pediatrition. She is an angel and we really, really really appreciate her and what she's done for me throughout the years. And then the Dr Gregory Cox, who was actually at the hospital at the same time I was. He was the visiting dermatologist at the ICEU and he came to visit me every day and at first my mom and I were very hesitant because we've been through so many dermatologists and medicines to the point where we didn't think one more could help. But Dr Cox came in with a mindset of we want to find a Lucifer Jeremy,...

...whether that's changing and adapting and finding new medication or something that won't affect my body, and he did outside research and helped us find different medicine medication that could possibly help me. And till this day we still go see Dr Cox at Primiter Dermatology and we still going in for checkups because he is someone who really cares for his patients and we'll go out of his way to find that solution that is unique to someone's story or someone's journey. That's great. And at primitive dermatology there's a nurse. Her name is Mary and she was one of the ones that directly helped with my light therapy from my skin. When I was out of the hospital, I went to that dermatologies and she was always there helping us on checkups, helping us on my skin and getting that you pisin. So being able to have a whole group of doctors and nurses who really want to see you get better support you was so helpful. That's great. I love that. Well, thank you for sharing that and thank you for sharing your story. And I have a funny feeling we're going to see Jeremy's names on sports credits video clips for the in the in the future. And you know, I love the fact that you have you found a passion so young. I know that when I was when I was in college, I got out and I didn't know what I wanted to do. So I think you've got a special privilege. It's there. You know, the fact that you're you've found a thing that you just just likes you up right. It makes you want to get up in the morning and go do it and and I not applauded you to continue to do that. So, Jeremy, thanks for being part of the show. Thank you for your story. As I said, we'll post the youtube videos, very powerful piece that you did, very well done, on the website under the episodes on heroes of healthcare podcastcom and we just wish you well. You know, three more exciting years and then whole new career ahead of you. So we're just excited to hear you and he can keep in touch and we just thank you for being part of the show. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. You've been listening to heroes of healthcare for more. Subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit us at heroes of healthcare podcastcom.

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