Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 4 weeks ago

Cycle of Patient Care During a COVID Surge (Part 2)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

COVID causes tremendous downstream impact within a healthcare system. 

It means that healthcare professionals are working 24/7 to care for all the patients who come in. It means that treatment of other patients — for example, those who are chronically ill or who need to get a CT scan — gets pushed back so that COVID patients can be treated.

In short, the effects of the COVID pandemic go way beyond COVID-infected patients.

In part 2 of this 2-part series, we continue our panel discussion with six distinguished physicians from Memorial Healthcare System. 

Our panel includes:

We discuss:

  • The delta variant
  • Whether FDA approval will improve vaccination rates
  • How to protect unvaccinated children

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify , or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player.

There has to be a concerted effort bysociety, and I know it sounds a little bit Corny, but that's what it's goingto take it's going to take stopping the nonsense on social media. It's going totake stop in using the vaccine and coved and people's lives as a political,a Jane Dat. You are listening to heroes of health care. The podcast thathighlights bold selfless professionals in the health care industry focused ontransforming lives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Welcome to part two of this special twopart edition of the heroes of health care, podcast cycle of patient careduring a Covin surge on your host Tet Wayne, as you may call in part one ofthis episode. We were discussing the cycle of care delivered by the team ofdedicated medical professionals at memorial health system in Hollywood.Florida an are hit very hard by the recent dealt a surge of covin nineteen.Let's pick up the show where we left off and delving to better understandingthe dealt the variant and the ongoing challenges being experienced by ourheroes in the medical industry, thanks for joining us. Thank you forcontinuing to share on that, but I'd like to shift if we could back to DrAccur and if you could share with us a lot about the Delta varian, we talked alittle bit about the level of transfer that this is much moretransferable. It's more infectious one of the questions that we had was. Wouldit be fair to say that the Delta variant causes a more severe case ofOvid. Well, I don't. I don't really think that I will cause a more severetype of coved. I think it's more contagious and, like Dr nob said,patience tend to have a very, very but high virology, a replication of thevirus in their system, which makes it more contagious and and likely causemore information in the patient. So the treatment really is the same that weare been using from the last search. It...

...hasn't changed much. It was a littlebit stressful at the beginning of the pandemic, when we didn't know how totreat the patients and there was like really no guide lands and every daythere was a new recommendation coming out and right now we have a more set ofguidelines that we can follow, but I think we're still missing more oftreatment for coid patients. I think that we still need to know more aboutthe disease and how it's really going to be treated probably in the future,will know more will. Basically what we're doing now is doing supportivecare and giving some of the medications that, and some of the studies haveshown that it improves the patient's outcomes, but for some reason somepatients don't improve and they end up in the ICU like doctor. Sorely wasexplaining to you guys. So you know when we start. You know several weeksago when I realized this was different, as was when I was started, seeingpatients in my office again getting infected and calling because of havingsymptoms and having some of the staff in the hospital getting infected againfrom transmission, maybe outside of the hospital, and so I felt it wasdifferent. I felt it was more contagious even before you know, weknew that it was more contagious because of the way it was coming up sofast and the amount of people that were getting infected around me. That was more than in the past. Other thingsthat I wanted to just point out is that, in fact, is the seas that usually seen,as you know, the doctor that trates infections, but the infection deceasedoctor has a bigger role in a healthcare organization as such as thisone and it's been stressful since the beginning, because we did not know how contagious was this various at thebeginning and so all the recommendations about personalprotective equipment and things that...

...people need to use to go and see thepatients have evolved during this time and- and I for example, now we knowthat we have to for short change our gowns. Every time we go see thepatients at the beginning, the CDC had recommended to probably use the samegown between patient and patient, just for conservation, because so was not inout PP at some point, and it was very, very stressful and the number ofmultidrug resistant infections has increased because of ovid around theUnited States. So one of the things that as intelectual e sees doctors wehave to do, is to make sure that there's infection control practicesthat are follow and we usually follow the CDC. But I'm telling you that theCDC has changed the recommendations multiple times and we just had to keepon our toes trying to figure out what is the newest recommendation o theother part that is very important is that, after all, the patients are inthe hospital we give them like the appropriate therapies that we knowabout. You know the ones for cowith. Some of them don't get out of the ICUfor months. So we end up seeing multiple infections that come withbeing hospitalized for such a long time, and some of the treatments that weregiven for coved cause your immune system to go. No meaning you get immune,suppress or more succesion to other infections, and so so that's whysometimes we have to get involved it you know later on during the course ofthe patient's hospitalization, and we also help the health care system withtheir employee health tracing, for example. Sometimes you know there'sstill some, you know healthcare workers that are not vaccinated and then theyget infected. They come to a hospital without knowing their infected and thenthe tracing of where that person has been is also a part of what we do inthe infectus of work. So all of that...

...has multiplied a hundred times withcoved like we used to do all this work, but now it's like exponentially more,and so we are working twenty four seven, what you know, multiple questions,trying to come up with strategies to avoid you know: infections, inside thehospital, because it happens that people can get infected in the hospitaltoo, because it's so contagious. So I just wanted to make sure that we pointout that there's so many aspects that have exponentially explode the work ofeverybody in the hospital and the other part that I want to make sure thatpeople understand is the more coid patience we have in our system in inthe hospital, the less we can take care of the chronically El Patient, thepatient that needs a mammogram. The patient. I need to see t scan might berescheduled because we cannot take care of them because we are taking care ofthose patients. So I think that people don't see the effect of the cogitpandemic that it goes beyond just the coved infected patients. Yeah, though,I think that it's important for the public to know that the far reachingimplications are beyond just ovid right. That that's your point is that there'sthere's just so much more going on within a help system, but I has beenderailed by by this virus. If I can just stay on with you and I'll openthis up. Some of these questions that I have now to the also to the group, butDr Eckerd, the FDA. Obviously this week approved the fizer vaccine, any sensefrom you and the team whether we think that will move the vaccine levelsnumbers up. Is that going to be the piece that will give the people whohaven't been vaccinated, the comfort they were looking for? Well what I feel I think it's importantthat it was at DA approve. You know the the people are reluctant and are alwaysnot going to take a vaccine will say,...

...for example, it was approved too fastby the FDA, but the reality is that I personally seen more people askingabout the vaccine and getting vaccinated in my office that werereluctant to take the vaccine since the Delta Varian search came up becausethey are seen people around them getting sick and dying from the disease.So I think that the FDA approval of the vaccine is going to help the ones thatare changing their minds because they're, seeing other people or theircommunity getting very well affected by this disease. A doctor relley yeah hithanks to N. I just wanted to a pine on that. I do think if da full approvalhelps, but I want to stress that this is not going to be the magic bullet toenable mass vaccination. There are so many barriers out there. I think therehas to be a concerted efet by society, and I know it sounds a little bit Corny,but that's what it's going to take it's going to take stopping the nonsense onsocial media. It's going to take stop in using the vaccine and coved andpeople's lives as a political agenda, and everyone needs to come on the samepage, no one for to bad vaccinations for polio was it because we sawcrippled people walking in the street, so it was real for everyone. It's arhetorical question, but it really needs to be a massive change across theboard. The FDA! U A was just wine in a long litany of excuses for people notto get vaccinated and to be manipulated by other leaders with the genders inmind, and I think that all of us every single one of us and that want to saysociety, we really have a responsibility to take care of this ofthis angle. Of this information, the FDA. Will approval is not going to makethe difference between where it is now and where we need to get it. I thinkalso- and I have stressed Thisto for...

...searing comedien in the past, like whenwe speak system wide. I think that it is important that health care providers,doctors and nurse practitioners that take care of patients that arevulnerable population recommend the vaccine on a personal basis, because byexperience like I said before, I take care of some vulnerable patients andthey were not at getting vaccinated because I was not telling them to getvaccinated. So if they trust their health care provider, they get thevaccine available near them. Some of them will get vaccinated if you have aconversation from a provider to to the patient. So I think that that'ssomething that also could be implemented more frequently around thesociety, because patients to trust your health care professionals, more thanpoliticians and people that are just talking on the TV about getting yourvaccine. If you say so, Doctor Acker I'm going to get it. That's what I,what they tell me and a lot of my patients have gotten vaccinated at,were very reluctant to get it because I was able to provide it here at myoffice and I was able to give them the counseling myself. Thank you and, andDr Nap ill go back to you on that. So what are some of the things memorialmight be doing as a part of the community to continue to to you know,push that out. Obviously, you guys aren't an AD agency and certainly don'thave funding, so something that I mentioned early in the podcast was thatwe were a public health system. What that means is we are, are well we'renot for profit, like many other many of the health care providers. We areactually owned by our community and we feel very strongly about meeting themission of proving the health of the community and really being a steward oftheir of their health and their healthcare resources, and, and I'veworked at a number of different health systems over the course of my fortyyear career and have seen places that say they do do this. This is the mostimpressive organization that I've seen. So we have a very strong communityoutreach program, even during peace...

...time, not just during pandemics, forimproving the health of, let's say the under the under privilegeor the socioeconomic ally challenged. In this circumstance, we've really hada very robust program. In fact, we were one of the first five hospitals in thestate to get the vaccine, and the first thing we did was identifyother health care providers that should probably get some of that vaccinerather than US using it ourselves, and so we started disseminated to otherhealth care systems. We opened up when the when testing first became availableon our own. We opened up a testing center in one of the large parks in theregion and had a drive through testing facility when nobody else was doingtesting again. This is going back early in the pandemic. We then, when thevaccine was available and wildly available, we then opened up our ownvaccination center, where people could make appointments and come in and getthe vaccination, and we staff that with people who really have day jobs, I meanwe pulled nursing staff and physicians and other leaders off the line in orderto make sure that we could give vaccinations to our community. So theseare things that we've been doing all along. We've had a very strong publicannouncement process for all of the things that are very pro pro. BasicallyP. You know good care for this pandemic about masking about social, distancingabout hand, hygiene about vaccination. It's something that we that we feelvery strongly about. Now, I'm not saying that others aren't doing that aswell. We have a regular call every week with all the CEOS in the state andother call with all the CEOS in the region, and all of us are sharing ourideas about how we're doing this and how we're trying to promote this work.This is truly a village, but it's a village. That's the size of the SouthEast right! Well, yeah Scottis stars grass roots and we got to just all becontinue to say the same thing and be consistent with our message as we'recoming up on time, and I want to be respectful of your guy's time, I'm justhumbled by the fact that you guys would give indulge us the time and willcontinue to get this message out. What...

...are the thoughts on you guys havetalked about the youth, the children who are the unvaccinated, who are whoare now seeing a heightened exposure to this thing? What are you hearing in themarket? What's the time frame or any information that you're hearing interms of well a? What can we do to continue to protect them? I guessmasking and the normal distancing things that we can do, but is there anyword that you're hearing in terms of when will the vaccine be able to be, orwhat are some of the things we can do today to help protect the youngergeneration who are don't have availability to this? Well, I have notheard exactly one day vaccine will be available for children below the age oftwelve. I think right now there you know, I have a lot of friends that areour MOMS, that are to have young kids and everybody's very stressed, becausethey're back in school and in some of the schools are not requiring masking.You know, kids as young as two years old, you know, have to use a mask allday. Long is very hard. So right now e the my recommendation, always as youknow, try to get them with the mask when he were there in school, make surethat they know that they have to clean their hands with either hand any timeor or wash it. You know try to stay in the outdoors as much as they can, butyou know they have to follow the rules of the schools in down here. Some ofthe schools are not using a mask, so it's challenging and we're going to seewhat happens. Hopefully, nothing happens, but I think a lot of kids aregoing to get co WID likely because adult of airing it's very, verycontagious and a something to point out with that. Is it's natural for parentsto be worried about their kids but in fact their kids are not really the onesthat are the concern, even now, even with Delta. We're still not seeing hugenumbers of children being admitted to the hospital were seeing childrengetting infected, we're not seeing huge numbers of children being admitted of ahospital, but those children live with...

...parents, and many of those parents, aswe know, have not been vaccinated. So it's interesting. The parents who'vechosen not to be vaccinated, who are also sending their children to schooland not requiring their children to wear masks, because those twobehaviours tend to go hand in hand are actually it significantly increasedrisk now for getting Covin because of the Delta Varian. And it's going to bevery interesting of what we see over the next month. Now that schools havestarted herded up again in Florida to see what happens to the population.That's basically the parents of these children and we may see another surge,yeah yeah. The analogy that I heard, which I like is you know if I'm notwearing my seat belt, I can get pulled over and get a citation and a ticket,and why do they give me a ticket if I don't wear my seat belt in my carbecause of my safety and the risk to the statistics, show and my chance tobe hurt in an accident? Go up significantly more. So it's interestingto understand why we wouldn't say: Wear a mask because we know significantlyit'll decrease your chance of getting Ovid, but I don't want to get politicalon her and all that sort of stuff, but it there does be. There is some logicthat gets defied in this in this pandemic age that we're in, I guess thelast thing I'll just kind of maybe throw out or, as you guys are withpatients- and we may have touched on this a little bit, but I just was in mynotes- and I just thought it would throw it out. What do you here is thehead scratch your biggest misconceptions, that you're hearing sowe're talked about all the bad data out there and and social media, and thethings like that. I'd love to just kind of go around real, quick last thing andjust ask what surprises you is the biggest misconceptions Dr Rely Yeah. Soyou know, I think it's a tough one because I think is health careproviders. You know, we've heard it all. You can go out on to the Internet andgo to one of the public messages that Dr Nap has spoken about, who we aretrying to educate the community. I've...

...been on public messages that I'm tryingto give and you can find all those excuses and all those misinformationsthere ranging from were robbing people of their freedoms. This is the biggestexperiment with human kind. People don't want to do it because I want tomake their own choices. I think you know we hear the Gamer of all thesethings. You know. I've certainly heard them. People people really feel thatthey are thinking for themselves. They making informed choices and it's basedon bad information. It's unfortunate that so much information is seen on theInternet and directly translated, as fact when it is. Thank you yeah. I mean I heard you fromDr Ackerton hear from you, trust your health care professional, if you're notsure what you're reading or what you're hearing or what you're seeing talk toyour health care, professional and ask them for some some straight advice. Ilove that Dr Acker, you said you know your health care professional istrusted far more than your local politician is or should be. So thankyou again all for your time and indulging us this. This has been reallyinsightful, really helpful. The message has to get out and we will make surethat we do that here. Dr Nap, thank you for you and your team for helping coordinate this. It's been our pleasure. Normally we end our episodes asking ourguests who they are, hero is or was, but I'm taking liberty as the host tojust say I actually see all of you as my hero and as our heroes. We want tojust thank you. So much for the work you're doing I don't know how toportray the sincerity, but you guys are our heroes, and that was the thegenesis of creating this podcast was you guys are on the front lines,fighting it out, putting your lives and you're, putting your families at riskin order to help other people, and I don't think that there's a better wayto show a servant, lead atitude, and we...

...just thank you and you guys are ourheroes and thank you for all you doing us on. Thank you to thank you forhaving us on. Thank you. Thank you. You've been listening to heroes ofhealth care for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of health care, podcast com e t.

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