Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 1 year ago

Connecting Healthcare Executives to Healthcare Solutions

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the best ways for healthcare leaders to gain knowledge and learn best practices is through conversations with their peers. However, it’s often difficult to arrange these types of conversations.

Hays Waldrop , Founder and President of the Institute of Healthcare Executives and Suppliers , has made it his life’s mission to act as a facilitator for these conversations. 

His company connects healthcare executives to each other and to suppliers for an ongoing conversation around what’s happening in the industry and what solutions are available to push it forward.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • Connecting healthcare executives with suppliers
  • Current problems faced by healthcare executives
  • Prevalent issues within healthcare

Resources mentioned during the podcast:

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player.

And I always just say I put smart people together and get things happen. Honestly, I believe that you've got to do that. You're listening to heroes of healthcare, the podcast that highlights bold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Hi and thank you for tuning in to you heroes of healthcare podcast on your co host, Olivia d' Angelo. On today's podcast we have the founder and president of ihes and Council of Supply team executives, hace Waldrap the Nashville areas where Hayes calls home, and he's been recognized twice as one of the top hundred healthcare executives, as well as honored with the Nashville business journals healthcare hero award. On today's show we are going to talk with hace about the changes he seen in the healthcare industry since the pandemic began and some of the positives that have come out of catastrophe. And welcome to the show, Hayes. Thank you so much for being here. Absolutely I'm pumped to be here. This is exciting. Well, we are very happy to have you in your industry. You are talking to health care executives every single day and right now health care executives are going through a lot. So we are very excited to hear your take on it and what you're hearing in the market. But before we get into that, how are you currently what is going on in the Nashville area? Nashville, that which is where I live, you know, home of healthcare and country music. It's doing great here. You would never know we're in the middle of a pandemic. Things are running wide open. I just went to a concert myself last weekend and it was just five thousand people ready to roll. So Nashville is ready and I'm kind of ready to get over it myself. But we got to be smart about this, without a doubt, and Nashville was one of those cities that was shut down for quite a while leading up to this. So you know, once they did open their doors, it sounds like the floodgates just just came with it. But that's exactly right. I mean there's no shortage of tourists here, and I mean literally all these different bands are having their concerts here. There were so, I think two or three that I know of large concerts this week end. So yeah, you would never know. You know that people were reluctant to get out. I think that everyone at this point, after going through this for so many months now, is really just in need of something positive and especially a little music that's uplifting, and that's something that I'll bring a little good energy and some good vibes to everyone. And you know this is a town for that for sure. So yeah, it was. It's it feels pretty good. Pretty almost feels kind of normal in a way here, but obviously our numbers and our hospitals are being taxed right now. I know vanderbilt they release some numbers this weekend and they weren't good. So let's hope everybody, I get some vaccinations. Are Our numbers are up there and we'll start us in this pandemic waning a little bit. Absolutely, absolutely well. Let's start by telling our listeners a little bit about who haz it us, and if you could start by talking about what led you to creating the Institute of Health Care Executives and suppliers, well, I can keep this pretty, pretty brief. I always say I'll give you my two cents and under two minutes. But yeah, I started, my wife and I actually started hs almost twenty years ago. I had seen something very, very similar and on a whole nother industry. In fact, it was an education. I'll learned about it, kind of studied it and befriended the the CEO of that company, and I said, why not, may why don't we do this for healthcare? And so I didn't know what I didn't know and I was fortunate that we, you know, I had some really, really quality executives that help get this started with me. So I've got three groups. I've got a CEO Group, supply chain group and also a pharmacy group, and so those three groups meet each and every year and person and we connect with those executives, with companies who sells, you know, either product, services, solutions made or whatever it is, to those three groups and we help them kind of figure out the industry. So that's what I do and we've again,...

...we've been doing it for twenty years and, you know, I'm so fortunate for so blessed. I have a lot of good people that help me. That's wonderful. Well, and in twenty years ago, whenever you decided, you and your wife decided to start this company. Prior to that, I did a little research on you and you were selling surgical products yourself. So what made you decide to make the transition of selling surgical products and then creating this company? Yeah, I guess started different about and kind of got me started in the orthopedic implant business. I worked with the company called Biomet so total hips and knees and shoulders and trauma to orthpeake surgeons. I absolutely loved it, but there was a time, you know what I was getting, frankly, getting tired of, you know, going down to the bus stops and Fedex and non stop getting in plant packages and, you know, boxes in and I was looking for something different. I wanted a different challenge. I wanted something where I could still be in healthcare but do it differently. And that's when I saw the other company that I mentioned, the in the other vertical and that's kind soon thereafter I started iths. And so, yeah, I love the implant business. I learned a lot being in surgeries. I think I did roughly about one hundred surgery somewhere in there, and so over of course, almost five years. So I learned a lot and it was really valuable and it's probably still helps me today as I talked to different people, just knowing that I had that background without a doubt, and I know that one of the things that you said you were most passionate about when it comes to its and just your companies in general, is that you really use this as a platform to connect people, and especially when we're in a time right now where that connection has been lost because it's impossible to really see people in person as much anymore and really get that going. What makes this so your passion project? You know, that's a really, really good question and I think if you'd asked me that a couple of years ago, probably could have really done a good job telling you. But what I think it I learned, and I even share this in the pre call with you, is that I learned kind of what my passion is, and it's not necessarily it's not about money. It's signed about a lot of things, but it I really enjoy connecting people and helping others and it's just something it took me a while to figure out. I'm not the brightest guy out there, but once it kind of dawned on me that, you know, I get satisfaction by connecting you with this person, to that person, and I'll see something kind of really kind of, you know, Bloom, if you will, from there. And and so that's in honestly, that's what I had been doing for twenty years. So I don't think I really truly understand it. And now, obviously, with you know where we are, you know, two thousand and twenty March from from now, from two thousand and twenty two now, you know, it's been a premium getting people to meet talk engage. It's been very, very difficult to do that and a lot of people have felt like they're on an island, even if they're inside large organizations and large companies. And so you know, I take that kind of seriously. That, you know, I think if I can help, I want to help. And you know, we've done a lot of different things platforms on, like presentations, webinars and those type of things in the last year that I've never done before, just trying to help the audience, the community out there, without a doubt, and I know that it has been a huge help. And you have mentioned to me that your role all day long, what you're doing is you're talking to these CEOS and these executives and you are trying to help them just move their business forward and come up with creative solutions to some of the problems they're having. How have some of those conversations been with some of these executives lately and what are some things that have really stood out to you about the problems they're facing? Yeah, that's another really good question. You know, I acaid. I just posted something today on Linkedin. I interviewed, did about six or seven men, a little interview with one of my hospital CEO's name Lee McCall. Lee Lives in southern Mississippi and basically details at twenty two percent is a vaccination right in that county, which is extremely low. Matter of fact it's the lowest in the entire state...

...in Mississippi, which is inherently low anyway, and they're being overrun the COVID patient. So you know, in those conversations with him you could actually heal it, hear it in his voice that it's difficult, it's lonely running a system, regardless of what size it is. And you know he right now he was taking telling all kind of cases where he's literally on the covid eight hundred number taking phone calls because he gets we don't have anybody else to do it in certain cases, and he goes. And then you get the calls from people who are all sick now and they're worried, they're scared, and he goes. You know, now they are all saying, I wish I had the I've been vaccinated. And but seeing all these stories and dealing with these executives, I'll learned so much and it's honestly, that that does. That feeds me as well. You know, just I'm talking to really smart people who have a great grasp on what they do, but they're sharing it with me and, you know, if I can help a little bit again, maybe connecting with a with a cumpany may be connecting with another executive that I know who's going through something. That's fun for me. But yeah, it's what I'm learning from them and it's a tough, lonely job and I don't care at what level, if you're the CEO, if you're in you know, vp of pharmacy or VP of supply chain, it's there's you know, it's all hands on deck. It's being prepared, it's, you know, trying to stay ahead and it's difficult to do. I don't and I have seen a number of articles. Mississippi is my homestate, so certainly have a bleeding heart for that entire you know all the different communities there and everything that they're going through. But in a situation like that and when you are talking to your CEO, and you know you mentioned that, you know he is fielding calls and they're really having to wear a lot of different hats right now, where are they seeing relief? Is there any light at the end of the tunnel for them? You know in Lady's case, in a show by county which is against southern Mississippi, they're not seeing much light. I mean again, that's what's make it makes it so difficult because the you know, the positivity rate goes is still going up. He basically he threw out the stat about eight percent of every three case will end up at a hospital and two percent of that number will end in death. He goes that's generally the numbers we see and he goes. Always see his hockey stick coming and he actually give a pretty good to me kind of a word picture. He says it's kind of like sitting on the beach at thirty a somewhere in Florida and seeing a category five hurricane come in and just sit there and not being able to move. And he gets because no one sits there and watches a category five, because we do, because we're healthcare and we've got to be here to help. And he goes. You know, he has nurses who are actually covid positive, who are actually treating covid patients because we have no other options. And he says we're sending patients out to the bigger cities as fast as we can. He goes. But guess what, they don't have places either. And so it's just a difficult time in certain areas. You know there in some of your bigger cities. They're not being over run necessarily right now, but you know, if you're and if you have a less resources and other cities with, you know, a lower of accelration vaccination range, that's tough. So you know, to me it's just I give a have a lot of sympathy and empathize with those guys. It's not easy to do, but that's kind of some of the things that they're going through right now. It's not easy, is it? And there are a lot of just devastating things happening across the country right now, but I know that you also have the pleasure of getting to talk to some of your clients about some of the really wonderful things that have come out of the pandemic and when you and I talked in our precall, you shared some pretty cool stories about some things that if it would if covid would not have happened, if this pandemic would not have happened to us as a country, some really positive things that...

...have come out of it would not have happened either. Would you mind maybe touching on some of those stories and just kind of some of the positives that have really come out of this as a whole? You know, I in one thing that I learned pretty quickly on. You know, there are a lot of people who, particular on the cell side of in the out there, they've all kind of been at home or in one way or the other for a long time, but this made a lot of people go to homes that weren't ready for the you know, they were working on cardboard tables and coffee tables and they had kids turning around and they didn't have very good monitors. A lot of people experienced issues like that and that was, I think, alonely, it was scary and, frankly, kind of unproductive initially. Now the positives. Kind of where I'm going with this is through a couple of months of kind of working out the kinks, they got they got their sea legs and they all began to improve a lot. And one thing that I think a lot of companies did, and this is companies, I'm talking also health systems, did the exact same thing. They did a really good job generally and the including people taking people off flying necessarily and not talking about business today or right now, we're going to talk about mainly just kind of our mental health. What are you feeling right now? And I'll give one a quick example. Advent health obviously one of the larger, you know, ideads in the country. They have an it department that gets together, I think it's every Wednesday for an hour. Nobody is allowed to talk business at all and they bring on speakers and I actually I was asked to come in, but you get to they just won't community. They want to build connection and they learned, as she told me, because you know, we've got people on here that our songwriters that I had never known that and he would. Some guy from Maine was playing a guitar and singing songs for him. And you get all these different people and all these skill sets together in a different environment and you I think, in one way and certain instances and certain companies when it was a priority, I think they really kind of grew together closer, and so I think that connectivity because of Covid has been a really positive thing. Now I think a lot of want to get back together, you know, and person, and that's what I do for a living is get people and, you know, in rooms together. But I do think, generally speaking, that you know, people did pretty well in this environment. About it, doubt. And do you think that now now, and that's such a cool example, because you're right. I think sometimes we almost have taken for granted when we are in person with people because we just feel that connection, because it's real, but we don't take the time to learn about people who are beside them and that usually tends to be enough. But you're right that this, if this forces us kind of out of our shell a little bit and it sounds like they've really taken the opportunity to hone in on it, and I wouldn't have happened otherwise. No, and you know, and again you start learning about people's pets and their dogs and what their home looks like, and mean you kind of get a feel for who they really are because, you know, we all when we're in the office where, you know, quote, we're on our best behavior, right and you know we're dressed appropriately and we say the right things. But if you're at home, you'd still do do those things on video, of course, but you're in a different environment and I think that's what people got a glimpse of. And the ones that you know, I know that the like Cleveland Clinic has a you know, they do a thing called the huddle, and that's every day they try to get everybody together. Many people have replicated that model long you know, across the industry. But getting people together to talk about, you know, what they're doing. It's better than ten minutes. I mean you need to do more than that, but I think, I think that whole concept is really, really healthy and I think it's been good for people to really get to know people better. Movie, without a doubt,...

...and another thing that I you had touched on previously is with travel being cut back a little bit and with some of the other things that help systems have had to cut out. It saves them financially and then they've been able to redirect those resources to other things. Can you talk about that a little bit? There's no question you know the zoom, the video called the Google meets and all those type of things. They're here to stay, at least that's in my my humble opinion. As it relates to communicating with if you're a supplier selling a product or service or solution to a health system, I think not all meetings are going to be virtual, but I really think a lot of them are. And to your point, you know, there's so many times when guys who were guys and gals would get on the air planes on Sunday afternoon and, you know, fly for our stay in hotels, get ubers and, you know, per dams and all that for an hour meeting. In some cases that our meeting could have been canceled, and meanwhile you just spent eight hundred a thousand dollars and untold hours away from home in a nonproductive environment, whereas you could have probably done that exact same call, just like the you know, on a zoom call, and got just as much out of it and not near the call. So I do think there's one company I know for sure that he said, you know, they were, they're not travel anymore. He goes we, you know, we demonstrated that we can serve our clients and do it well and do it all via zoo and he goes, we're not going to change and he says it will save us seven figures a year. And so yeah, I think those type of things are here and I think that's that's been a positive. Honestly, that has been a positive. With this got it down and with the annual meetings that you have every year, are you anticipating that you will be able to have these in person again? Are you going to have an in person and virtual component? Well, you know, Lord will, and we're definitely meeting. I've got I've got a my CEO meeting is in like September, so it's coming up in three four weeks and by the time of sairs it'll probably, you know, we've already had that. But yes, right now, that's that's on track. Then we've found October and a November meeting. You know, I'd some of the larger industry meetings have just been one was in Vegas Hymns last week. They went off well arm which is a national meeting that's coming up, and as well as a couple others. So you know, if I have to go kind of a hybrid model, we are were prepared to do that. I actually been talking to different companies that can do that for us, but I hope, you know, again getting people in rooms and I always just say I put smart people together and get things happen. Honestly, I believe that you got to do that and I know my group are asking for it. They want to they want to see each other because it in some cases it's been eighteen months since they've seen each other, and so that's that's clearly what I'm trying to do and what I plan on doing. I got it and I think that these meetings are probably going to be so much more than you could imagine because people again are taking any time together for granted, not in this current moment because it's been so long since we've been able to do it. Have there been any specific breakout discussions or topics that your sea sweeds and these health care executives have asked you to bring into the fold as part of these meetings. You men, I think generally you have tele medicine is you know, that is that's huge. That's got that topic is here to stay as well, kind of just like this whole virtual technology we're using today, as you know, to record this. You know that was a prevalent a year and a half ago. Well, same thing. Telling medicine has been here for probably six some years, but it advanced itself in a matter of two or three months to be used all the time. And so tele medicine, I think, got a massive push. It's going to be here. I'm frankly, you know, I even saw...

...it with my own parents. You know, if you think of it this way, I have to healthy, but you know older you know parents who would have to go get a blood draw or something, or whatever it is. Well, you know, if they don't have to get up and get dressed, go part going to you know, elevators and go get a blood drawl or just have a consult, they can do it literally on their phone. It saves all day for them, you know, and so those type of things. Clearly we are been talked a lot about with the exacts. You know, where's it going to go? What's the new evolution in that? How do they incorporate that? Also, it's a competitive advantage to have it. Also you've got competitors moving and trying to take part of their business that way. To some of these national companies, you know, they're trying to kind of carve off the kind of the you know, the still the profitable pieces of their business, and so they've got to figure that stuff out too. So out of strategies going into it. But you you know, there's a lot of convenience and actually, I mean there's a higher margin if you could do it right as well for them. Very true. And what else would you expect if some of these breakout discussions when you when you get all these smart people in a room together? So tell a health will definitely be something that they're they're coming together and chatting about. What are some other topics that you would expect? Well, I'm you still have issues right now, particularly companies that deal with capital budgets, staffing, all those things are I mean, I think staffing is probably priority number one, particularly with your nurse burnout. You have Dr Burnout. You have a lot of issues there. Your well, I know you're well aware of that. And so they're they're struggling trying to keep their staffing in line with the numbers they need. That is a massive problem. So that will be up there. You know, on capital budgets, they took a hit. You know, you lose about a hundred days of revenue plus. You lost emotion stuff them lost other revenue just because, you know, everything from visits and labs and all those things didn't occur. So they lost a lot more money than just that hundred days of revenue of you know, shutting things off and so that that's that's going to impact the way they grow, the what where they spend their money. But I do think, you know, going back to that staffing piece, man, that's a problem. I had a CEO tell me what those interesting during he had. He was in Louisiana, smaller hospital down there at the time, and he was saying, you know, they had covid you know, wall to wall. Then they got hit by two hurricanes and back to back. One was my primarily win and they lost all these trees and power and all this stuff. In the next one, I had lots of rain, I lot of water damage and a lot of flooding and all that stuff. Well, he says, you know the amazing thing about my staff? The amazing thing hays, he goes. We never went without someone staffing a bed. He goes, including he goes more than I can even counter. Name or nurses who lost homes, their own personal homes. They still showed up to work. He gets they care about their work that much. Now you cause. But the problem is they'll never lose or they'll never leave the battle. When in the middle of the war, he gets but when the war is over, a lot of are going to go I'm done. You know, I'm I'm whatever your age, I'm fifty five, I'm sixty, I'm sixty five, I don't need the money anymore. I'm done. And so a lot of them, I think that's one thing that we're experiencing and we're going we're going to see more of it. It's just that, you know, that fatigue. They're tired, rightly so. They've worked non stop and so anyway, I think those are raciues tell medicine, staffing capital budgets are going to be three really really kind of topical things, not a doubt. And I think that as it relates to tell medicine, it's been really amazing following it and all the the new ways that tell themed is being used now and utilize. And again, it would not have happened if the...

...pandemic would not have hit. I don't I think eventually we would have gotten there, but it really pushed us as a society to bring telemed into the fold. There was Telemat is used for all different kinds of specialties now, but even the way that you can use robotics over you know, tell now and you can actually perform procedures without being, you know, actually with the patient. So it's really remarkable and I don't think that we would have been nearly where we are today without everything happening and forced us there. Agreed a hundred percent. A lot of things were pushed. You know, in this we sped up the process tell a medicine probably as much as anything. Absolutely well, and how would you say that? It's from a supplier standpoint, like how what are things looking like on the the fireside? Well, I mean, I think they're trying to get back, trying to get their repetition back, basically get their cadence back, because they've still struggling, most of them, many of them, to you know, get their reps, get their people back in the hospital seeing doctor, seeing, you know, staff and whoever they need to talk to, and that has been that's been really, really difficult and, frankly, that's going to be the challenge. Kind of we you know, a lot of these systems are still have work for home policies and so a lot of these people are still not able to get into the hospital to see who they want to. So I for a while that's just going to be at one of their primary challenges. Now, if you have and if you if you're not the incumbent and have something new, it's you might be a little bit before you started experiencing a lot of success. You will if it's good enough, but right now I think a lot of companies who just the status quo is being is that's kind of the norm inside of the hospital. They're not going to do a lot of different things, change a lot. They just kind of like the way they are and as soon as they kind of get back and hope again, I'm hopeful that's next month. I don't know what it's going to be. But I think that's when you'll start seeing, you know, a lot new innovations and listenings are getting kind of brought to the to the table. Well, and have you change the way that you do business? You, or were you doing many phone calls or many video meetings prior to this? No, no, no, I'm not at all. I'd fact, I had done one, one video call in my entire life that I can recall prior to March, two thousand and twenty. And so, just like you and everybody else probably as listen to this, you know, we've done a hundreds, if not thousands, of those sins. But frankly, I kind of enjoy it. You know, I've for as I mentioned, for Twenty Years I've been working here and being able to actually see people. And you know, it's not, again, it's not. It's not seeing people in person, but it is getting to see some you know, to learn a little more about people, and so it has changed my business, no doubt. Again, I've never done webinars, I never been interviewed a CEO and put it out like on Linkedin, er. I've never done any of that, and so that really did change a lot of kind of my you know, my process and could trying to connect people, without a doubt, and I would love for you to expand on that a little bit. I have watched several of your interviews that you've posted. How did that come to be you interviewing, you know, some of these healthcare executives and what made you decide to speak with them about these topics and then share it to all of the people you're connected to? Well, I'll tell you what happened early on was, you know, as I meant, I've kind in the middle of provider and supply right, so I'm not either one, I'm in the medal. Well, early on, during the middle of the pandemic, I mean we're talking March, April, May, of course, there was like no communication kind of ongoing with most people. I was getting phone calls from like my class, my friends, the suppliers, primarily going what are you hearing? You know, what are they telling you? Or and so I would begin to reach out...

...to some of my CEO supply chaining pharmacity leaders and say what's going on? How bad is it, and they'd say, well, it's this or that or you know, they would kind of give me the their temperature, if you will, and I said, you know what, let me can I just record this and I'll send it out and we'll get your voice, your message, to everybody, because you're answering the questions that I'm getting. And so we started doing that and it's kind of crazy how it's it just kind of got a life if its own. I mean we've done I mean native, you know, views are probably a hundred plus thousand views. I don't even know what it is, and and that's just what I know about, because when it's shared, I have no idea where they go. So it's been a great way for these exacts to promote their teams, not their own ego, but promote, you know, the teams that are, what they did, their challenges. Also talk about, you know, their road map and I try to bring in some personality out of them as well. I mean I'll ask them some silly questions, but it's fun for you know, they'll talk about their what movie they've watched the most, or they're very first concert they ever attended or something like that. The kind of learn and a little bit more about them. And so, but that's how it all started. It was just as a way for me to grab a message that they're telling me and then give it out to everybody else, and it was well received and it was I feel like it was, you know, it was kind of needed. I think that's great. And of all of the interviews that you've done, the one with the most listens to her the most views. Do you recall who you were talking to and what that topic was about? You know, I have to go back. You got me on that one. I have to say early on some of them were well for a lot of reasons, but I think because there were so new, I got a lot more views early on and I'd have to go back and look at them. I know I actually interviewed the CEO of hospital special surgery and he talked about how they basically flip that entire orthoped that's an orthopedic hospital. It's probably premier in the world and they in about two to three weeks time, they flip that into a covid hospital and it was just phenomenal. So that did really well. But I mean I had a bunch of others that you know in some of them that are surprised. You. You know, you're thinking, well, it's it's okay, but it'll just go through wildfire. Just depends on that day. And those the algorithms of Linkedin and all those those things that are kind of complicated. Of course. Of course one and from this has also spun. So, you know, have your own podcast, the power supply podcast. Did it come from doing these videos? And that's what made you lie? You know what, this could be even larger platform than what I was initially thinking. You know, generally speaking, yes, I had to actually always been thinking about having my own, but I never did it right. It was one of those I got the idea but I never acted, and I'm sure if nobody out there has ever done that. But during the pandemic, when I started doing these videos and post those out there, I had some guys out there who I knew who were watching them, who would comment and hey, he's you know, we already do podcasting and we're want to do one, particularly about power or supply chain, and they said would you, you know, be a cohost with it, and they kind of told me that, you know, the the positive part of it. I said Yeah, that'd be fun and and so we did it. We I think we're probably I don't know, twenty thirty episodes in or something like that and it's starting to get a lot more pick up. But it's fun, you know, and I've learned all love again last year and them my last year and a half. Just like all of us, I've learned a different side of me and learned a lot about things that I never knew and so, you know, it was a good challenge. You know, sometimes you get comfortable in our own skin and it's I think it's healthy to push ourselves a little bit and I I was uncomfortable for a time. I'm uncomfortable right now, but we're getting we're getting there or in Previv it every day and I think that's, you know, I think that's what,...

...you know, part of growing up, but learn a lot more. One of the things that we did Webinar that was really well attended. Speaking of those were, I did one about mentoring and coaching and I had about four coaches on their or healthcare related mentors and coaches who had, you know, had a lot of experience and you know, so many people are what I never really understood, because we all have insecurities and those insecurities hold us back, and that particular Webinarre. It was so evident that that's one thing that holds so many people back. You know, they get promoted and then they don't do well because they don't feel like they have the capabilities or they don't do this or that, and so, you know, again, being pushed to do something differently, given a little coaching, it's a it's amazing what we can accomplish. So, yeah, last year was was different and I'm hopeful to make them, you know, the best of a bad situation without it, and I think one of the great things to do is you say that is now these webinars and these interviews and the podcast that you have, it's being brought to an audience that would have never heard these conversations before and it's going going to be able to really resonate with someone that you would have never been able to impact otherwise. So that's really something special to know that you know that this is expanding far beyond what you would have originally imagined. Oh, absolutely, and and that's another thing I would just say, like your podcast is fantastic and you know, and obviously if you're listening this, you understand that, but one thing I've learned you know, during this whole thing, particularly the last year and a half, because I've listened to podcasts so much more than I ever did before because, you know, there's like I member, there was just kind of well, there's a lot of worry and your stuff and I just go out walking or I go exercise and I'd listened to a couple podcasts at a time and how much I learned. I mean it's incredible. What resource is out there find so much. You know, I even told this to my son the other day. We're talking about some book and he goes, I really want to read that book and I said, Oh, you know what I did? I was going to read it. I was at I was going to audiobook. Actually, then I have searched him on spotify. I found every episode this that this particular the writer author had written or had been on. Episodes I listened to. It's about four or five episodes that I knew the book. And you know, but you can learn so much by just applying yourself and listening and learning, and I would just encourage you know that. You know, you got to be with people. You learn from other people and you learn from listening to him and we don't know one knows all the answers. I I particularly it's say I don't know all the answers, but I'm willing to learn, without a doubt. And and I think that, like you said, you were connecting so many people out there and it's such a wonderful platform. But who would be a good who candidate of someone who reach out to you so that they can they can receive your help in connecting others? Who should we do a the call to action out there for? Yeah, I mean, you know, I'm always on the look, look out for exact hospital executives, either CEO Pharmacy or supply chain, who kind of fit this profile. They always are looking to learn, always willing to share and always willing to listen. It's pretty simple, but those are the kind of those those are the three attributes that I look for the most. So always interested in those type of exacts that fit that. On the on the supplier side, anybody who will who's willing to learn and who's willing to say, you know what, I don't have the answers, but I have a solution. We think that we're trying to bring to market or a product or service or whatever, and I did need some refinement and need some tweaking, and so I'm always looking for those type of companies, of those on either side the supply or the provider. That's great. And in talks with your executives recently, do you have any insight into what two thousand and twenty two might look like for us? What are they anticipating? I don't know, I don't I mean, I think you know, from what I've read and what I've heard, is that now we're going to have a little bit of this carry over going...

...forward, but hopefully it's going to be much more manageable. We've just got to see where our vaccines take us and but I don't know. I mean I think, you know, kind of back to where we started this whole thing. We're going to be working through this one way or the other, healthcare. It's going to happen one way or the other and we've got to deal with it and we've got to, you know, change our models, you know, a little bit here and there so it'll work. And if you're a physician out there, you know you got to figure out a way to, you know, make the needs of your patient, to operate on them, and all those which that's not going to change much. I don't think surgery shuners. It's certainly gotten a big bats out of this, but I don't really know what two thousand and twenty two holds, but I just hope it's going to be even better than two thousand and twenty one. It has to be. Right. I think two thousand and twenty two just has a nice ring to it. That's what I've been saying for quite a few months now. I'm with you on that. Absolutely well, and it wouldn't you know, be the the heroes of healthcare podcast without touching on healthcare heroes. But one of the things that I know you probably would be too humble to mention to our listeners, but I know that you were honored with national business journals healthcare hero award. Can you tell us a little bit about that and what it felt like to be honored with that award and and kind of where that came from and what's made that possible? Yeah, I mean it's I don't know if I can tell you the whole story behind it, but the Nashville Healthcare Council is has a robust backbone here in the city. They've done a great job. Probably I would venture to say it's the best in the country and there's hundreds and hundreds of healthcare related companies here and every year they do they have some, you know, different awards. They also go in with the Nashville Business Journal as well, which is part of that, and they put together various rewards, and so I've been fortunate enough I got a couple of those here and there, and again it's just a lot of those things are, you know, they're they're great to have, but you know, it's kind of like, okay, now I won that, let's get on with it. So what's it? Certainly it's something you are making an impact and, like you said, just connecting all of these healthcare leaders and just bridging the gap and allowing them to help learn from one another and find these solutions to all the problems that they're having. That's you're creating that platform and that outlet. So that's really something to be proud of and we, you know, are excited to see where it goes from here. But what about your healthcare heroes? Do you have someone, or more than one, that currently comes to mind that you'd like to give a shout out to? Well, there's always I have been a bit so so blessed honestly by people who I have been around, all healthcare related guys and Gals, who who kind of, you know, took me out of the wing and helped me. And that could have been open a door, called somebody, a tend a meeting or for me early on, or whatever it could be. I mean, there are there. It's there's a lot, but I will say there's one guy in Craig Farrell. Dr Craig Farrell, dear dear friend of mine. He actually is north peak surgeon here in Franklin, Tennessee. He operated on me when I was a junior in high school torm acyl and had a really bad knee entry and he operated on me. But come to find out, we actually he became a mentor to me big time. But he was he was nationally recognized. He was on the part of the United States Olympic Committee. He was the the swim team dot for the US Olympic team and then he later, because his wife loved horses and was a hunter, jumper and stuff, he became the team dot for the US a question team traveled the world, Soul Korea, you name it. He'd been all over the world with our Olympic team. But watching him deal with people, he is he was a world class surgeon, but he was a better person and I could tell story is after story about how he treated patients his bedside and miner was absolutely amazing. And but unfortunately a horse was his downfall. He was playing Polo one afternoon and he got bucked off a polo pony and he broke his neck and he died. And so one thing I would say...

...about that one. It was kind of interesting, if you will, or paints a really good picture. When they had his visitation, they did at a local high school, because I knew it was going to be big, and I kids you not, that family had probably five thousand plus people show up to see him. And he at his funeral he had one on a judd saying, who is a dear friend of his, tray s ackin saying. I mean, I could go on and on the people he touched and it's a really mean again, I've known him since one thousand nine hundred and eighty three. He actually, I didn't say that's early on, but he was the reason I started hs. He gave me a push financially, how get me out the door to do this. But the cool thing, you know, is you look back at him, I bet you I met twenty people who said Dr Farrell was my best friend, and so to me he's my Hebro that is such a special story and I think that whenever you're given that that want to be in healthcare and to serve patients, it's something that he can avoid and when you are able to go out there and just make such an impact and just just save so many people's lives, I think that that is just such a wonderful story to share and I'm glad that you were able to give him his spotlight here at the very end. He deserves it, no doubt about it. I've got a picture of my mom up on the wall, who which you can say because you're but it's yeah, he's a special person to me and I honestly he touched thousands and thousands of lives, so he's definitely hero. Then the people whose lives he's saved are continuing to save lives and change lives because of him. A man. Absolutely that's wonderful. Well, we do really appreciate you being on our show has and again. If there is anything that we can do to help supports you, please let us know and hopefully you'll be able to share some additional insights with us in the coming months. Fabulous. I enjoyed this a lot and keep up the great work and I appreciate you asking me all right. Thank you. You've been listening to heroes of healthcare. For more, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit us at heroes of healthcare podcastcom.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (50)