Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 2 weeks ago

Connecting Healthcare Executives to Healthcare Solutions

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the best ways for healthcare leaders to gain knowledge and learn best practices is through conversations with their peers. However, it’s often difficult to arrange these types of conversations.

Hays Waldrop , Founder and President of the Institute of Healthcare Executives and Suppliers , has made it his life’s mission to act as a facilitator for these conversations. 

His company connects healthcare executives to each other and to suppliers for an ongoing conversation around what’s happening in the industry and what solutions are available to push it forward.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • Connecting healthcare executives with suppliers
  • Current problems faced by healthcare executives
  • Prevalent issues within healthcare

Resources mentioned during the podcast:

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player.

And I always just say I put smartpeople together and good things happen honestly. I believe that you've got todo that. You are listening to heroes of healthcare. The podcast that highlights gold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's getinto the show hi. Thank you for tuning in to you here as a help care podcast,higher co host Olivia de Angela on today's podcast. We have the founderand president of I hes and Council of Supply to n executives. Haste Wall tripthe national area as where Hays calls home and he's been recognized twice asone of the top hundred healthier executives as well as honored with thenational business journals health care hero award on today's show, we aregoing to talk with pace about the changes he seen in the health careindustry since the pandemic began, and some of the positives that have comeout of catastrophe and welcome to the show hey. Thank you so much for beinghere absolutely I'm pumped to be here. This is exciting. Well, we are veryhappy to have you in your industry. You are talking to help your executivesevery single day and right now help your executives are going through a lot,so we are very excited to hear your take on it and what you're hearing inthe market, but before we get into that. How are you currently what is going onin the Nashville area? Mashal, which is where I live? You know home of healthcare and country music. It's doing great here. You would never know we'rein the middle of a pandemic. Things are running wide open. I just went to aconcert myself last weekend and it was just five thousand people right to roll,so Nashville is ready and I'm kind of ready to get over it myself, but we gotto be smart about this without a doubt, and Nashville was one of those citiesthat was shut down for quite a while leading up to this. So you know oncethey did open their doors. It sounds like the flood gates. Just just camewith it, but that's exactly right. I mean there's no shorge of tourists here,and I mean literally all these different bands are having theirconcerts here. There was, I think, two or three that I know of large concertsthis weekend. So yeah you would never know. You know that people werereluctant to get out. I think that everyone at this point after goingthrough this for so many months now, is really just in need of somethingpositive and especially a little music, that's uplifting and that's somethingthat will bring a little good energy and some good vibes to everyone andknow you know this is a town for that for sure so, yeah it's. It feels prettygood, pretty almost feels kind of normal in a way here. Obviously ournumbers in our hospitals are are being taxed right now. I know Ven Ebel. Theyrelease some numbers this weekend and they weren't good. So let's hopeeverybody gets some vaccinations. Are Our numbers are up there and we'llstart to see in this or of pandemic waning a little bit? Absolutelyabsolutely! Well, let's start by telling our listeners a little bitabout who hayes this and if you could start by talking about what led you tocreating the Institute of Health, your executives and suppliers. Well, I cankeep this pretty. Pretty brief. Always shall give you my two cents and undertwo minutes but yeah I started my wife and I actually started is almost twentyyears ago I had seen something very, very similar and on a whole notherindustry. In fact, it was an education I learned about it. I kind of studiedit and befriended the the CEO that company- and I said why not me- whydon't we do this for health care? And so I didn't know what I did know, and Iwas fortunate that we, you know, I had some really really quality executivesthat helped get get this started with me. So I've got three groups: I've gota CEO Gr supply, Chin Group and also a pharmacy group, and so those threegroups meet each and every year and person and we connect with thoseexecutives with companies who sells you know either product services, solutionsmade or whatever it is to those three groups and we help them kind of figureout the industry. So that's what I do and we've Gee we've been doing it fortwenty years, and you know I'm so...

...fortunate so blessed. I have so a lotof good people that help me that's wonderful, well and and twenty yearsago, whenever you decided you and your wife decided to start this company.Prior to that, I did a little research on Ya and you were selling surgicalproducts yourself. So what made you decide to make the transition ofselling surgical products o then creating this company yeah? I E, Istarted their friend of mine kind of got me started in the orthopedicimplant business. I worked with a company called by met, sold total hipsand knees and shoulders and trauma orth peak surgeons. I absolutely loved it,but there was a time you know I was getting frankly getting tired of youknow, going down to the bus stops and Fedex and non stop getting in plantpackages, and you know boxes in and I was looking for something different. Iwanted a different challenge. I wanted something where I could still be inhealth care, but do it differently and that's when I saw the other companyethat I mentioned the in the other vertical and that's and soon thereafterI started hs and so yeah. I love the implant business. I learned a lot beingin surgeries. I think I did roughly about twelve hundred surgery somewherein there and so over course, almost five years, so I learned a lot and itwas really valuable and it's probably still helps me today, as I talk todifferent people just knowing that I have that background without a doubt-and I know that one of the things that you said you're most passionate aboutwhen it comes to its and just your companies in general- is that youreally use this as a platform to connect people and especially whenwe're in a time right now where that connection has been lost, because it'simpossible to really see people in person as much anymore and and reallyget that go in what makes this so your passion project. Now that's a reallyreally good question, and I think, if you'd ask me that a couple years ago,probably couldn't have really done a good job telling you. But what I thinkI learned- and I even share this in the pre call with you- is that I learnedkind of what my passion is and it's not necessarily it's not about money. It'snot about a lot of things, but I really enjoy connecting people and helpingothers, and it's just something it took me a while to figure out I'm not thebrightest guy out there, but once you kind of dawned on me that you know Iget satisfaction by connecting you with this person to that person, and I seensomething kind of really kind of you know bloom if you will from there andso that's why and honestly that's what I had been doing for twenty years and Idon't think I really truly understand it and now obviously with you knowwhere we are. You Know Two thousand and twenty March from from now from twothousand and twenty two now you know it's been a premium getting people tomeet talk, engage it's been very, very difficult to do that and a lot ofpeople felt like they're on an island even if they're inside largeorganizations and large companies- and so you know I take that kind ofseriously- that you know. I think if I can help, I want to help- and you know,we've done a lot of different things. Platforms on like presentations,webinars and those type of things in the last year that I've never donebefore just trying to help the audience the community out there without a down-and I know that it has been a huge help- and you have mentioned to me that yourrole all day long, what you're doing, is you're talking to these CEOS andthese executives and you are trying to help them just move their businessforward and come up with creative solutions to some of the problems theywere having. How have some of those conversations been with some of theseexecutives lately and what are some things that have really stood out toyou about the problems they're facing yeah? That's another really goodquestion! You know! Actually I just posted something today on Linkedin, Iinterviewed a t about six or seven men. Little interview with one of myhospital CEOS named Le Maccall Lee lives in southern Mississippi andbasically details at twenty two percent is her vaccination rate in that county,which is extremely low matter of fact, it's the lowest in the entire state ofMississippi, which is inherently low...

...anyway and they're being override covedpatients. So you know in those conversations with him you couldactually heal it, hear it in his voice that it's difficult. It's lonelyrunning a system regardless of what size it is, and you know he right now.He was tollente telling all kind of cases where he was literally on theCovin eight hundred number taking phone calls because he gus, we don't haveanybody else to do it in certain cases, and he goes and then you get the callsfrom people who are all sick now and they're worried they're scared, and hegoes you know now they are all saying I wish I had the I've been vaccinated andbut seeing all these stories and dealing with these executives, Ilearned so much and it's a honestly that that does that feeds me as well.You know just I'm talking to really smart people who have a great grasp onwhat they do, but they're sharing it with me and in no. If I can help alittle bit again, maybe connecting with a with a company may be connecting withanother executive that I know who's going through something that's fun forme, but yeah, it's what I'm learning from them and it's a tough lonely joband I don't care at what level, if you're the CEO, if you're in you, knowVP pharmacy or VPS supply chain, it's there's, you know it's all hands ondeck, it's being prepared, it's! You know trying to stay ahead and it'sdifficult to do. YEA, and I have seen a number of articles Mississippi is myhome state, so certainly have a bleeding heart for that entire. Youknow all the different communities there and everything that they're goingthrough. But in a situation like that and when you are talking to your CEOand you, you know you mentioned that you know he is feeling calls andthey're really having to wear a lot of different hats right now. Where arethey saying? Relief is there any light at the end of the tunnel for them? Youknow in Lee's case in a showman which is against southern. I missippi they'renot seeing much light. I mean again, that's what make it makes it sodifficult because the you know the positivity rate goes is still going up.He basically, he threw out the stat about. Eight percent of every case willend up at a hospital, and two per cent of that number will end in death. Hegoes that's generally. The numbers we see- and he goes always see- is hockeystick coming and he actually gave him pretty good to me a kind of a wordpicter. He says it's kind of like sitting on the beach at thirty eightsomewhere in Florida and seeing a category five hurricane come in andjust sit there and not being able to move and he gets because no one sitsthere and watches a category five, because we do because we're health careand we've got to be here to help- and he goes you know he has nurses who are actually coved positive,who are actually treating ovid patients, because we have no other options and hesays we're sending patients out to the bigger cities as fast as we can,because we guess what they don't have places either, and so it's just adifficult time in certain areas. You know they're in some of your biggercities, they're not being overrun necessarily right now, but you know ifyou're in, if you have a less resources and other cities with you know, lowervaccernated rage, it's tough. So you know to me it just I give a lot. I havea lot of sympathy and empathize with those guys. It's not easy to do, butthat's kind of some of the things that they're going through right. Now, it'snot easy and it sat, and there are a lot of just devastating thingshappening across the country right now, but I know that you also have thepleasure of getting to talk to some of your clients about some of the reallywonderful things that have come out of the pandemic, and we you and I talkedin our pre call. You shared some pretty cool stories about some things that, ifit would, if coved would not have happened if this pandemic would nothave happened to us as a country, some...

...really positive things that have comeout of it would not have happened either. Would you mind maybe touchingon some of those stories and just kind of some of the positives that havereally come out of this as a whole? You know in one thing that I learned prettyquickly on you know: There are a lot of people who particular on the cell sideof in the out there they've all kind of been at home or one way or the otherfor a long time. But this made a lot of people go to homes that weren't readyfor it that you know they were working on cardboard tables and coffee tablesand they had kids running around and they didn't have very good monitors. Alot of people experienced issues like that, and that was, I think, a lonely.It was scary and frankly, kind of unproductive initially now thepositives kind of where I'm going with this is through a couple of months ofkind of working out the kings. They got, they got their sea legs and they allbegan to improve a lot, and one thing that I think a lot of companies did- and this is companiesI'm talking. Also health systems did the exact same thing. They did a reallygood job generally and including people taking people off flying necessarilyand not talking about business today or right now, we're going to talk aboutmainly just kind of our mental health. What are you feeling right now and I'llgive one a quick example: Advent Health, obviously one of the larger you knowidens in the country they have an it department that gets together. I thinkit's every Wednesday for an hour. Nobody is allowed to talk business atall and they bring on speakers, and actually I always asked to come in, butyou get the they just want community. They want to build connection and theylearned, as she told me, because you know we've got people on here that aresongwriters, sit, I'd, never known that, and he would some guy from Maine wasplaying his guitar and singing songs for him, and you get all thesedifferent people and all these skill sets together in a differentenvironment and you, I think, in one way in certain instances, in certaincompanies when it was a priority, I think they really they kind of grewtogether closer, and so I think that connectivity, because of Ovid, has beena really positive thing now. I think a lot of them want to get back together.You know in person and that's what I do for a living is get people and you knowin Rams together, but I do think, generally speaking, that you knowpeople did pretty well in this environment. I found a doubt and do youthink that now and that's such a cool example because you're right, I thinksometimes we almost have taken for granted when we are in person withpeople, because we just feel that connection, because it's real, but wedon't take the time to learn about people who are beside them and- andthat usually tends to be enough, but you're right that this. If this forcesus kind of out of our shell a little bit and it soundslike they've reallytaken the opportunity to home in on it and that wouldn't have happened.Otherwise, no and then you know and begin you start learning about people'spets and their dogs and what their home looks like. And I mean you kind of geta feel for who they really are. Because you know we all when we were in theoffice were, you know, quote we're on our best behavior right and you knowwe're dressed appropriately and we say the right things, but if you're at homeyou'd still to do those things on video, of course, but you're in a differentenvironment. And I think that's what people got a glimpse of and the onesthat you know. I know that the like Cleveland Clinic has a you know. Theydo a thing called the huddle and that's every day they try to get everybodytogether. Many people have replicated that model long. You know across theindustry, but getting people together to talk about. You know what they'redoing it's better than ten minutes. I mean you need to do it more than that,but I think I think that whole concept is really really healthy and I thinkit's been good for people to really get...

...to know people better without it out,and another thing that you had touched on previously is with travel being cutback a little bit and with some of the other things that help systems have hadto cut out, it saves them financially and then they've been able to redirectthose resources to other things. Can you talk about that? A little bit now?There's no question: You know the zoom, the video calls the Google meets andall those type of things they're here to stay. At least that's in my myhumble opinion, as you relates to communicating with, if you're a supplyor selling a product or service or solution to a health system, I thinknot all meetings are going to be virtual, but I really think a lot ofthem are and to your point, you know there's so many times when guys wereguys and gals would get on airplanes on Sunday afternoon, and you know five forhours stand, hotels, get obers and you know perdes and all that for an hourmeeting in some cases that our meeting could have been canceled and meanwhileyou to spend eight hundred a thousand dollars and untold hours away from homein a nun, productive environment, whereas he could have probably donethat exact same call, just like the you know on the zoom call and got just as much out of it and not nearthe call. So I do think there's one company. I know for sure that he saidyou know they were there not travel any more. He goes we. You know. Wedemonstrated that we can serve our clients and do it well and do it allViaziga d. He goes we're not going to change and he says it will save USseven figures a year and so yeah. I think those type of things are here andI think that's that's been a positive honestly. That has been a positive wit.This O it out and with the annual meetings that you have every year, areyou anticipating that you will be able to have these in person again? Are yougoing to have an IM person and virtual component? Well, you know Lord will andwe're definitely mating. I've got I've got a my co meeting is in Osper, soit's coming up and three four weeks and by the time of SARS it'll, probably youknow, we've already had that. But yes, right now, that's that's on track. Thenwe've got on October and a November meeting you know some of the largerindustry meetings have just been one was in Vegas Hymns. Last week they wentoff well arm, which is a national meeting. That's coming up and as wellas a couple others. So you know if I have to go kind of a hybrid model. WeAre we're prepared to do that. I actually been talking to differentcompanies. They can do that for it, but I hope you know again getting people inrooms and I always just say I put smart people together and good things happen.Honestly. I believe that you got to do that and I know my group are asking forit. They want to. They want to see each other, because in some cases it's beeneighteen months since they've seen each other, and so that's that's clearlywhat I'm trying to do and what I plan on done. I got. I think that thesemeetings are probably going to be so much more than you could imagine,because people again aren't taking any time together for granted, not in thiscurrent moment, because it's been so long since we've been able to do it.Have there been any specific breakout discussions or topics that your seaweeds and they help your executives to have asked you to bring into the foldas part of these meetings you mean, I think, generally of Tela. Madison isyou know that is that huge, that's got that topic is here to stay as well kindof just like this whole virtual technology. We're using today, as youknow, don't record this. You know that was a prevalent a year and a half agowell same thing, telling medicine's been here for probably six somethingyears, but it advanced itself in a matter of two three months to be usedall the time and so tell him Madison, I think, got a massive push. It's goingto be here, I'm frankly, you know, I...

...even saw it with my own parents. Youknow, if you think of it. This way I have to healthy, but you know elder,you know parents who would have to go, get a blood draw or something orwhatever it is well. You know if they don't have to get up and get dress, gopart going to you know elevators and go get a blood draw or just have a consult.They can do it literally on their phone, an IT saves all day for them. You know,and so those type of things clearly ave been talked a lot about with exacts.You know, where's it going to go. What's the new evolution in that, howdo they incorporate that? Also, it's a competitive advantage to have it alsoyou've got competitors moving in trying to take part of their business that wayto some of these national companies. You know they're trying to kind ofcarve off the kind of the you know, the still the profitable pieces of theirbusiness, and so they've got to figure that stuff out to so hotes strategiesgoing into it. But you, you know, there's a lot of convenience, andactually I mean there's a higher margin wif. You could do it right as well forthem very true, and what else would you expect some o thesebreakout discussions when you, when you get all these smart people in a roomtogether so tell a health, will definitely be something that therethey're coming together and chatting about what are some other topics thatyou would expect? Well, you still have issues right now: poticary companiesthat deal with capital budgets, staffing. All those things are, I meanI think staffing is probably priority number one, particularly with yournurse burn out, and you have Dr Burn out. You have a lot of issues there.You're well got. I know you're well aware of that, and so the they'restruggling trying to keep their staffing in line with the numbers theyneed. That is a massive problem, so that will be up there. You know capitalbudgets, they took a hit. You know you lose about a hundred days, a revenueplus you lost a most of a lost other revenue, just because you knoweverything from visits and labs and all those things didn't occur, so they losta lot more money than just that hundred days. Revenue of you know shuttingthings off, and so that's that's going to impact the way they grow the wherethey spend their money. But I do think you know going back to that staffing piece. Man,that's a problamatin. I had a co, tell me but thought it was interestingduring he had. He was in Louisiana. Smaller hospital down there at the time-and he was saying you know they had ovid- you know walled wall, then theygot hit by two hurricanes and back to back, one was primarily wind and theylost all these trees and power, and all this stuff and the next one I had a lotof rain. I had a lot of water damage and a lot of flooding and all thatstuff. Well, he says you know the amazing thing about my staff, theamazing thing hays he goes. We never went without someone staffing a bed. Hegoes including he goes more than I can even Count Our Name, our nurses, wholost homes, their own personal homes. They still showed up to work becausethey care about their work. That much now because, but the problem is they'll,never lose or they'll never leave the battle when in the middle of the war hegets, but when the war is over, a lot of them are going to go. I'm done, youknow, I'm I'm whatever age, I'm fifty five, I'm sixty I'm sixty five. I don'tneed the money anymore, I'm done and so a lot of them. I think that's one thingthat we're experiencing and we're going we're going to see more of it. It'sjust that. You know that fatigue they're, tired, rightly so, they'veworked non stop, and so anyway, I think those are issues tell in medicine,staffing capital budgets are going to be three really really kind of topicalthings down, and I think that as it relates to telle medicine, it's beenreally amazing. Following it and all the new ways that tellaman is beingused now and utilized and again it...

...would not have happened if if the PANdid MAC would not have hit, I don't, I think eventually we would have gottenthere, but it really pushed us as a society to bring Taliman into the fold.There was tell mad is used for all different kinds of specialty sale, buteven the way that you can use robotics over you tell a now and you canactually perform procedures without being you know actually with thepatient. So it's really remarkable and I don't think that we would have beennearly where we are today. Without everything happening it forced us.There agreed to a hundred percent. A lot of things were pushed. You know anjuste sped up the process tell em medicine, probably as much as anythingabsolutely well and and how would you say that it's from a supplierstandpoint like how what are things looking like on the efistle, I mean, Ithink, they're trying to get back trying to get the repetition backbasically get their cadence back, because they've still struggling mostof them, many of them s to you, know, get their raps get their people back inthe hospital seeing doctor, seeing you know, staff and whoever they need totalk to, and that has been that's been really really difficult and, frankly,that's going to be the challenge kind of we. You know a lot of these systemsare still have work for home policies, and so a lot of these people are stillnot able to get into the hospital to see who they want to. So I for a while. That's just going to beout one of their primary challenges. Now, if you, if you, if you're, not theincumbent and have something new, it's it might be a little bit before youstarted experiencing a lot of success, you will, if it's good enough, butright now, I think a lot of companies here, just the status quo is being isthat's kind of the norm in side of the hospital they're not going to do a lotof different things, change a lot they just kind of like the way they are andthen as soon as they kind of get back and hope. Hope Again, I'm hopefulthat's next month. I don't know what it's going to be, but I think that'swhen you'll start seeing you know a lot new innovations and those things aregetting kind of brought to the to the table well and have you changed a waythat you do business to a? Were you doing many phone calls or many videomeetings prior to this? No, no, no, not at all. In fact, I'vedone one one! Video call in my power life that I can recall I, prior toMarch two thousand and twenty, and so just like you and everybody else,probably is listen to this. You know we've done hundreds of not thousands ofthose sins, but frankly I kind of enjoy it. You know I've, for, as I mentionedfor twenty years, I've been working here and being able to actually seepeople, and you know it's not again. It's not it's not seen people in person,but it is getting to see some. You know to learn a little more about people,and so it has changed my business. No doubt again, I'd never done webinars. Inever had been interviewed a CEO and put it out like on link down or I'venever done any of that, and so that really did change a lot of kind of myyou know by process and country to connect people without a doubt. I wouldlove for you to expand on that a little bit. I have watched several of yourinterviews that you've posted. How did that come to be you interviewing? Youknow some of these health, your executives, and what made you decide tospeak with them about these topics and then sheer it to all of the peopleyou're connected to well I'll, tell you what happened early on was. You know,as I mentioned, I'm kind of in the middle of providing supplier right, soI'm not either one I'm in the middle. Well, early on during the middle of thepandemic, I mean we're talking March April May, of course there was like nocommunication kind of ongoing with most people. I was getting phone calls fromlike my class, my friends, the suppliers primarily going. What are youhearing? You know, what are they telling you or I, and so I would beginto reach out to some of my co, Sapota...

...farmans leaders and say what's going onhow bad is it and they'd say? Well, it's this or that or you know theywould kind of give me their temperature. If you will- and I said you know whatlet me can I just record this and I'll- send it out and we'll get your voice.Your message to everybody because you're answering the questions that I'mgetting, and so we started doing that and it's kind of crazy how it's it justkind of got up a life of its own. I mean we've done, I mean native, youknow, views are probably a hundred plus thousand views. I don't even know whatit is and- and that's just what I know about, because when it's shared, I haveno idea where they go. So it's been a great way for these exacts to promotetheir teams, not their own ego but promote you know the teams there whatthey did their challenges. Also talk about. You know their road map and Itry to bring and some personality out of them as well. I'm an I'll ask himsome silly questions, but it's fun, for you know: they'll talk about their.What movie they've watched the most so their very first concert they everattended or something like that to kind of learn a little bit more about them,and so, but that's how it all started it was just. I was a way for me to graba message that they're telling me and then give it out to everybody else, andit was well received and it was I feel like it was. You know it was kind ofneeded. I think that's great and of all of the interviews that you've done theone with the most listens to were the most views. Do you recall who you weretalking to and what that topic was about? You know I have to go back. Yougot me on that. One I have to say early on. Some of them were well for a lot ofreasons, but I think because they were so new, I got a lot more views early onand I'd have to go back and look at them. I know I actually interviewed theCo Hospital Special Surgery and he talked about how they basically flipthat entire Orthop, it's Orthopedic Hospital Iso, probably Premiere in theworld, and they in about two to three weeks time. They flip that into a aCovin hospital and it was just phenomenal, so that did really well,but I mean I had a bunch of others that you know some of them that aresurprised you, you know you're thinking. Well, it's it's okay, but it'll. Justgo through wildfire just depends on that day and those Halgrim of blinkdown and all those those things that are kind of complicated. Of course, ofcourse, we and from this is also spun. You know, have your own podcast, thepower supply podcast. Did it come from doing these videos and that's what madeyou realize. You know what this could be an even larger platform than what Iwas initially thinking. You know, generally speaking, yes, I had toactually always been thinking about having my own, but I never did it right.It was one of those. I got the idea, but I never acted and I'm sure nobodyout there has ever done that, but during the pandemic, when I starteddoing these videos and posting those out there, I had some guys out therewho I knew who were watching them. Who would comment and hey? You know wealready do podcasting and were wont to do one particularly about power orsupply chain, and they said, would you you know, be a co host with it and theykind of told me that you know the the posie part of it. I said Yeah that'd befun, and, and so we did it- We, I think, we're probably I don't know twentythirty episodes in or something like that and it's starting to get a lotmore pick up, but it's fun. You know, and I've learned all of again last yearand my last year and a half just like all of us, I've learned a differentside of me and learned a lot about things. I never knew and so it you knowit was a good challenge. You know, sometimes you get comfortable in ourown skin and it's, I think it's healthy to push ourselves a little bit and I was uncomfortable for a time I'muncomfortable right now, but we're getting we're getting there. Weimprove it every day and I think that's you know. I think that's what you know.Part of growing up, I learn a lot more...

...one of the things that we did web in orthat was really well attended. Speaking of those where I did one aboutmentoring and coaching, and I had about four coaches on their or health carerelated mentors and coaches who had you know, had a lot of experience, and youknow so many people are which I never really understood,because we all have insecurities and those insecurities hold us back andthat particular rabbit. It was so evident that that's one thing thatholds so many people back, you know they get promoted and then they don'tdo well because they don't feel like they have the capabilities or theydon't do this or that, and so you know again being pushed to do somethingdifferently. Given a little coaching. It's a it's amazing. What we canaccomplish so yeah last year was a was different and I'm hopeful to make theyou know the best of a bad situation, and I think one of the great things to,as you say, that is now these weapon ars and these interviews and thepodcast that you have. It's being brought to an audience that would havenever heard these conversations before and it's going going to be able toreally resonate with someone that you wade have never been able to impactotherwise. So that's really something special to know that you know this isexpanding far beyond what you would have originally imagined. Oh absolutelyand that's another thing I would just say I like your podcast is fantasticand you know- and obviously, if you're listening this to you understand that,but one thing I've learned, you know during this whole thing particularlylast year and a half, because I've listened to podcast so much more than Iever did before, because you know there's like i. maybe there was justkind of there was a lot of worry and your stuff that I just go out. Walkingor I go exercise and I'd listen to a couple podcast at a time and how much Ilearned, I mean it's incredible: What resources out there find someone's youknow. I even told this to my son the other day we're talking about some bookand he goes. I really want to read that book and I said, Oh, you know what Idid. I was going to read it. I was a I was on get an audio book. Actually,then I a search in on spotify. I found every episode this that this particularthe writer the author had written or had been on episodes. I listened to itabout four or five episodes and I knew the book and you know, but you canlearn so much by just applying yourself and listening and learning, and I wouldjust encourage you know that you know you got to be with people. You learnfrom other people and you learn from listening to them and we don't. No oneknows all the answers. I particularly say I don't know all the answers, butI'm willing to learn without a doubt and- and I think that, like you saidyou were connecting so many people out there and it's such a wonderfulplatform, but who would be a good candidate of someone to reach out toyou so that they can? They can receive your help in connecting others? Whoshould we do the call to action out there for yeah? I mean you know I I'malways on the look look out for exact hospital executives, either co pharmacyor supposing, who kind of fit this profile. They always are looking tolearn, always willing to share and always willing to listen, it's prettysimple, but those are the kind those those are the three attributes that Ilook for the most so always interested in those type of exacts that fit thaton the on the supplier side, anybody who will who's willing to learn andwho's willing to say you know what I don't have the answers, but I have asolution. We think that we're trying to bring to market or a product or serviceor whatever- and I did need some refinement and need some tweaking, andso I'm always looking for those type of companies of those on either side thesupplier of the provider. That's great and in talk with your executivesrecently, do you have any insight into what o thousand and twenty two mightlook like for us? What are they anticipating? I don't know. I don't I mean I think you know from what I've read and what I've heard,except now we're going to have a little...

...bit of this carry over going forward,but I hopefully it's going to be much more Magebe. We just got to see whereour vaccines take us and but I don't know I mean I think youknow kind of back to where we started this whole thing we're going to beworking through this one way or the other health care. It's going to happen.One way or the other and we've got to deal with it and we've got to you know,change our models. You know a little bit here and there so it'll work and ifyou're a physician out there, you know you got to figure out a way to to. Youknow meet the needs of your patient to operate on them and all those whichthat's not going to change much. I don't think surgery, centership,certainly gotten a big bouts out of this, but I don't really know what twothousand and twenty two holds, but I just hope it's going to be even betterthan two thousand and twenty one. It has to be right. I think two thousandand twenty two just has a nice ring to it. That's what I've been saying forquite a few months now, I'm with you on that absolutely well, and it wouldn'tyou know, be the the here is of help care podcast without touching on healther heroes. But one of the things that I know you probably would be too humbleto mention to our listeners, but I know that you were honored with nationalbusiness journals health care hero award. Can you tell us a little bitabout that and what it felt like to be honored with that award and a kind ofwhere that came from and what's made that possible? Yeah I mean it's. Idon't know if I can tell you the whole story behind it, but the NationalHealth Care Council has a robust backbone here in the city. They've donea great job, probably I would venture to say it's the best in the country andthere's hundreds and hundreds of health care laded companies here and everyyear they do. They have some. You know different awards. They also go in withthe National Business Journal as well, which is part of that and they puttogether various rewards, and so I've beenfortunate Ogh. I got a couple of those here and there and again it's just alot of those things. Are you know they're they're great to have, but youknow it's kind of like okay. Now I won that, but let's let's get on with it, I well it it. Certainly it's somethingyou are making an impact and, like you said just connecting all of thesehealth care leaders and just bridging the gap and allowing them to help learnfrom one another and find these solutions to all the problems thatthey're having that you're creating that platform and that outlet. Sothat's really something to be proud of it. We you know, are excited to seewhere it goes from here. But what about your health care heroes? Do you havesomeone more than one that currently comes to my that you like to give ashout out to well there's always. I have been I've been so so blessedhonestly by people who I have been around all health care related, guysand Gals, who, who kind of you know, took me out of the wing and helped meand they could have been opened a door call somebody attend a meeting or forme early on or whatever it could be. I mean there. Are there it's there's alot, but I will say: There's one guy in Craik Farrell, Craig Ferrell, dear dearfriend of mine. He actually is north peak surgeon here in Frank in Tennesseehe operated on me when I was a junior in high school tormes and had a reallybad knee entry and he operated on me but come to find out. We actually hebecame a mentor to me big time, but he was. He was nationally recognized. Hewas on the part of the United States Olympic Committee. He was the the swimteam dot for the US Olympic team and then he later because his wife lovedhorses and was a hunted jumper and stuff, he became the team dot for theuse, questor team traveled the world. So Korea, you name it he'd, been allover the world with our Olympic team, but watching him deal with people. Heisn't. He was a world class surgeon, but he was a better person and I couldtell stories after a story about how he treated patients. His bedside mannerwas absolutely amazing and but unfortunately, a horse was his downfall.He was playing Polo one afternoon and he got bucked off a polo pony and hebroke hiss neck and he died. And so one...

...thing I would say about that once itwas kind of interesting if you will or paints a really good picture when theyhad his visitation, they did at a local high school, because I knew it wasgoing to be big. And I kid you not- that family had probably five thousandplus people show up to see him and he at his funeral. He had one on a jug. Asing who is a dear friend of his traain sing, I mean I could go on and all the people hetouched, and it's really I mean again. I'd known him is one thousand ninehundred and eighty three. He actually, I didn't say this early on, but he wasthe reason I started the hes. He gave me a push financially. He get me outthe door to do this, but the cool thing you know. If you look back at him, Ibet you. I met twenty people who said Dr Fare was my best friend and so to me he's my hero. That is sucha special story, and I think that whenever you're, given that that wantsto be in health care and to serve patience, it's something that you can'tavoid and when you were able to go out there and just make such an impact andjust just save so many people's lives. I think that that is just such a wonderful story to share and I'm gladthat you were able to give him because spot light here at the very end hedeserves it. No doubt about it. I've got a picture O my up on my wall, whichyou can see because here but yeah he's a special person to be, and I honestlyhe touched thousands and thousands of lives, so he's definitely a hero andthe people whose lives he saved or continuing to save lives and and changelives because of Fay men. Absolutely that's wonderful! Well, we do reallyappreciate you, be an honor show hays and again. If there is anything that wecan do to help support you, please let us know, and hopefully you'll be ableto share some additional insights with us in the coming months. Fabulous. Ienjoyed this a lot and keep up the great work, and I appreciate you askinme a right. Thank you. You've been listening to heroes ofhealth care for more subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player,or visit us at heroes of health care. PODCAST T.

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