Heroes of Healthcare
Heroes of Healthcare

Episode · 4 months ago

A Look Back at Heroes of Healthcare in 2021

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It’s been an eventful year in healthcare and at the Heroes of Healthcare podcast.

In this episode, the hosts of the show, Ted Weyn, Executive Vice President of Systems Innovation, Marketing & Strategy, and Olivia D’Angelo , Division Vice President of Neurology, both with Jackson & Coker, take a look back at the year that was.

They discuss:

  • Their favorite episodes from 2021
  • The themes that continued to pop up throughout the year
  • New episodes coming out next year

Mentioned during the podcast:

The team at Heroes of Healthcare wishes you a happy and healthy holiday season. We’ll see you in 2022!

To hear this interview and more like it, subscribe to Heroes of Healthcare on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Heroes of Healthcare in your favorite podcast player.

Healthcare heroes or people just like us and not recognized enough. I mean that was really, I think, why we started the show, as we realize that you're listening to heroes of healthcare, the podcast that highlights bold, selfless professionals in the healthcare industry focused on transforming lives in their communities. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the heroes of healthcare. I'm your host, Ted Wayne, and I'm Olivia d' Angela, and welcome to our end of the year podcast episode that we thought we would do a little retrospective. It's been our first year and we've been very excited about everything that has come along and the numbers of people who are following and just the information we've been bringing to our loyal listeners and hopefully lots of new listeners in the upcoming two thousand and twenty two year. Hard to believe we're saying that, but twenty two, thousand and twenty two. So we thought we would just go through and just talk a little bit about some of our favorite episodes and what we saw this year, what we learned in the world of healthcare, and then we can start to create a little hype over next year because we've got some fun people coming to see us. I am excited and it is so hard to believe that it's been an entire year of the heroes of healthcare podcast. I had the chance to join several months back and it's been so much fun for me, and now we are coming to everyone from our brand new studio. So that's really amazing. Feeling very legitimate here. It's it really does. I know it's really ended the year on a high note and going into two thousand and twenty two with some excite meant yes, for sure. So I know that we've done a little bit and thanks to our we have awesome production people who help us every week make this happen and they did a great job of helping us pull some of the data together. So, as you think back over your time and when you kick this off, what was your what's the first one that hits you? It's that you did that was your favorite. Now I think my very first one is one that really sticks out in my mind. I had an excellent guest, Dr David Priest. He's the SVP of safety, quality and epidemiology at no vant help and he talked with...

...us about Covid as well as all the way to Loahloa and just the fight against infectious diseases. One of my favorite quotes of his is how he talked about how infectious diseases are still the coolest field of medicine and I thought that was really fun. But the entire time I talked to him he was really insightful and talked about just some of the terrible things about infectious diseases and gave a lot of lessons learned. So all the more reason we have to learn lessons from what we're just endured and we're going to keep this from happening again, and part of it is we need to continue and invest in our public health programs. Yeah, no, it's great insight. I actually think he's somebody we probably need to have on more regularly again because of his background and with everything that's going on in the world. So I think that's did that was. That was a favor of mine. It's hard to pick favorites, I think for myself, one of the first ones that really jumped out my mind was when we had Richard Johnson, president of advocate in Aurora health south side of Chicago, on and just his transparency and is talking about how the pandemic was difficult and such a tough urban setting to begin with. You know, I love that he was very vulnerable. He talked about it. He talked about the impact of George Floyd's impact on the hospital and really why underserved and black communities are a greater risk of succumbing to covid nineteen, you know, and he really I loved that he did things about talking about all the different levels that he could learn things. There are things that you can learn at all levels and in all situations, but that helped shape you and you can apply them if you're women to be flexible and willing to listener, and that you know. Also, he talked about how he we're in healthcare, he can really make a difference in the ability to change people's lives. So I'd say that's why Richard Johnson was one of the my favs. His vulnerability...

...was special and I appreciated how much he opened up to you. That was a great one. Yeah, when you take on the pandemic and Covid this unconsidable disease there we havoc across the world, and you place that on places like the south sage to Corgo, where historically has been a lack of access, lack of investments and education, infrastructure, food, deserts, I mean you name it. You lack of jobs, right, and good paid employment, because, as you know, employment leads, the better housing opportunities leaves, the food leaves, the better health care least, the bet education it all those things are our intertwine. They're they're not mutually exclusive. All right. So covid Shit light on what we've known all a while. It not only shed light, it was a spotlight like this creates the disproportionate death rates that we're seeing in persons of colors and minorities, you know, black and Brown people, blacks, Hispanics, you know. You know this creates that. The other ones, I think early on for me and Pink Punk, back to you with just Mount Sinai you know it. Dr KNAPP and we had Brendan car who were both so instrumental in dealing with New York City, who was obviously arguably hit one of the hardest out of any one of the urban areas, and just all the things they did. and Dr Knapp also talked about how the George Floyd situation compounded the stress put on the staff. It's funny how one of the reoccurring themes as we talked to people throughout the year that that was something that I wouldn't have thought of in the midst of dealing with the you know, medical staff, dealing with the covid and everything,...

...but that the you know, the the unrest socially was just a piece where they just said it just put an additional pressure on them, you know, and I know he even reference back to Joplin, Missouri and how that was just a prep way to be prepared for disaster. It comes down again, if you're of a certain mindset that this is not a big deal and that stuff happens and if you get it, you get it, and you're not going to take away my civil liberties and I'm not going to get a vaccine and I'm not going to wear a mask, then the consequence, I think, is really in this again um healthcare worker. The consequence is that our healthcare infrastructure can't handle that, we're not built to manage taking care of, you know, additional thousands of patients. And the other piece was, I'm just going back to Brendan car I just I mean the guy set up a hospital in Central Park, you know, and just the logistics and all of the things that had to come with that was just amazing to me and how they had an ability to set that whole thing up in the park and the tents and working with Samaritan's purse. And I loved what he said about how the city, working with New York City. They were making decisions and record time, where in the past that was something that they just couldn't would have taken, I think what he said, he would have taken a year to get a know and in weeks they were getting things with water turned on and electricity to the park and all of that. It was it was pretty fascinating and how they did that is that's wild. The website has all the episodes as well. You can reach that at heroes of healthcare podcastcom. It's a whole big long well, whole big long you rl, but that'll get you there as well. Absolutely. So, what about you? Well, I think that a Segue to when you talked about Dr Knapp. He came back again and he provided insight along with a panel of other healthcare providers, and one of the coolest episodes. I think we've done it also required a...

...ton of different logistic things behind the scenes. I try to play people on a podcast at one time. That one was wild, but I really love that we were able to pull that off and it it was so well done. That was episode twenty three and we actually had to do it in two parts. But Ted, I loved how that came together and for those of you who didn't have a chance to listen to it, we got to talk to our Ted specifically, was able to interview a panel of different doctors and from the moment of patient comes into the hospital and it's determined that they have covid to when they leave, we talked to every single different doctor and went through that life cycle and I really thought that that was so interesting because I think we hear stories from the outside, but this really gave us an inside glimpse into it. Yeah, do you think about that one? No, I agree. and Dr Aur Sir Ellie was unbelievable because he was the head of the ICEEU and you know, I don't know that there's any easy jobs in this cycle, but I think when you're in the ICEE you and you're in debating and he's telling US statistics like two out of three people are in debated are not going to survive or are going to have long term medical effects. I mean the impact of that is real and I think that that's and his passion around the vaccination. And you know, I think for the first time what I saw this was obviously this was after Delta had come out, and I think what we saw there was a different level of frustration and the physicians. I think early on, when we talk to some of the physicians, they were feeling passion and come passion around the unfortunate situation that the patients were in. And with Dr Sarelli, I think you've felt a bit of didn't lose that compassion. He actually came out and said I don't want anybody who didn't I don't want anybody to be here, and so that there was a sentiment going out in the media that the doctors were a little bit misrepresented...

...in that regard. But he said, but I'm frustrated because it could have been avoided. And he said when I was handing people ipads to potentially say goodbye to their families the first wave of covid he said it broke my heart there and he said in the second time though there was a level of frustration because he felt had they've been vaccinated, they could have been avoided. So I think that that I think for me, that was one of the that was one of the big pieces that really struck out and you could hear in his voice his passion about it. Dr Cats, Randy cats, who is in the emergency room, talked about how they try to quickly Triaj and assess them so they can get them either too into the hospitalist area or right up to the ICEEU, depending upon the severity of the the acuity of the of the COVID and how it was setting in. It's interesting too, because when that was released it was right when the delta search happened, and now we have amicron that just hit the map and hit the United States. So it's another one that will have to get some of these doctors back to speak with us about, unfortunately, but we need to make sure that we're staying aware and up to date on the latest of what to expect with each of these different variants. Sure, I know you mentioned that episode of Fourteen Tales of tell a health was one of one of your faves. To this one really struck a chord with me. I really love that tell a health has just completely gone off the charts. That's one of the positive outcomes I think about this pandemic and about Covid is that we've had to find other ways to get healthcare. We've made great strides in now realizing that there are large medical deserts that need to be wired for tell a health. Kany Mac, who was the president of Women's Telehealth, and Dr an Patterson, who is the CEO at women's tell a health, they both joined and I loved your interview with them. It was so fascinating to me how they talked about just what tell...

...a health looks like for some of these women that are in different countries and be care that they're able to receive without having a doctor actually physically in their presence. They talked about robotics and they talked about all of the different, you know, machines that can promote Sonogram yeah, remote till. It was just absolutely remarkable to me and it just really made me feel like, you know, all of these different parts of the world that maybe have been without healthcare, it's like now they might actually have some relief and I felt that that was it kind of gave me hope a little bit too. It's we've all been under such a covid cloud that it gave me some some optimism that there is going to be a lot of good that also comes out of this, because it's forced us to to really embrace some of these other technologies that have been there but just have been under utilized. Yeah, and I think that she even talked about like one of the the way that they're zooming today. HMM, yeah, I think. I think for sure. and Dr Es Kiago from Nevad also talked about how there, you know, the they were. They were pioneer testing and piloting the delivery of medicine in the North Carolina market by drone. And we talked, we heard from advocate out in California and how they were doing the doctors from home program where certain patients were being sent home to be treated by Tella by visiting nurses and opening up more beds in the hospitals when they could be done. So yeah, I think the innovation and advancement. I've heard people say Tella, going back to the that episode, has been advanced ten years faster because of Covid, the dropping of the restrictions, the showing of what we could do, the validation of Medicare taking the certain things and now processing it. So yeah, so in the in the darkness of covid there's for sure has been some some sparkling lights of things that we can look forward to exactly exactly. I thought that that was really amazing. What was another one of your favorites? You know the...

...themes this year that were really good. I loved yours with John Corris. I mean I like that because it was just leadership and it was about servant leadership and I think that he we went away from clinical a little bit, but yet we were still in that setting and I just loved his listening to the his approach to what were the must haves to be a strong leader. I really enjoyed that one too. He that was actually episode twenty six. EXTENTENCE, it's titled Embracing Authentic Healthcare Leadership and that title really sums it up. He did such an incredible job of talk, taking us through his recent PhD program and all of his studies. That really confirmed that authentic leadership and being a vulnerable leader is the way to really lead and if you want to have a thriving team you need to be authentic and transparent, lead with vulnerability and kindness, and he gave multiple examples about how he does that with his team and I think that that was really insightful. I run a team at that's my day job. You obviously are our leader to and that's something that you've done for for many, many years, and it rings true. was there anything that he's said that surprised you, or did you feel like leading in that way is something that all leaders should be doing anyway, and you're just glad that he was able to spread the word? Yeah, I mean I you know, I think you know. What he talks about strategy and vision is really resonated with me because I actually really think that all of these things can get executed, but they're easier with culture. So I think the strategy and vision is important, to be clear, but I think culture is a pays such a key, important thing, because you can have great vision and strategy, but if the culture is an open to receiving it, talk to about that, I think that's becomes really important and I think those things...

...execute better. But he is an expression right culture eat strategy for breakfast, and I think that. That's very true and I think you know, John Talks about that in a way that is real, that his strategy and vision is embraced because he has set the tone with such a strong culture. And so when you take strategy and vision and caring for the people that I'm responsible leading and you tie that into sort of the complexities of the work that we do, that just really excites me exactly. I really appreciate it that. And he also too is running such a large health system. One of the things that he told me that I thought was wild is that he often opens up and says that and promises that every single person that is within the Tampa General Hospital umbrella, if they send him an email, he will read it and he will respond to it. Yeah, and he has a thousand employees right so to offer up that type of time and vulnerability. I asked him during that one too, if his family would, are his kiddos would want to go into healthcare, and he said absolutely not, that they see how necessary it is but also how much work it is, and it's because he really does just put leadership first. He is an incredible leader in Tampa General. Their community is very, very lucky to have them. Yeah, him. Yeah, and he, you know, in the fact that he was. He told a story about the mistakes he made and loaning up to them and, you know, being being okay and humble to say I'm sorry and and not just be that. Well, I've got to I've got to be the big, Macho leader. And you know, and I'm never wrong, you know, I think you become credible when you're real right. I think so too, and I love, though, that it was still he is a healthcare hero and he's running this huge health system, but that leadership style translates no matter what type of leader you are, what industry you're leading in. So I thought that that was also really interesting and how it could relate to all of us. I look forward to hearing from him were as well...

...in the new year. Yeah, I guess. And and selfishly, as I as we kind of close out, I'll you know, I would be remissed to say that my dad's episode, our first episode, episode one when the pharmacist was your doctor. I would be remiss in not bringing that one up. Unfortunately, this week we lost my dad and so that's been something we've been going through and we were actually talking about having a second episode with him. So well, I'll see if I can tap in somehow to get some words from him. But you know, that was fun to do. He's always been my hero and you know, he'll be missed from us in our families. But just for a guy, you know, born in one thousand nine hundred and twenty nine and spending his life in the whole pharmacy life, as he talked about that, he's that he was at thirty three cents an hour was a you know what was what he was getting paid and hearing just some of the crazy stories. But how the pharmacist back before health insurance and everything, you really went to them first. They were the first kind of Line of defense. So it's kind of fun to have him on and obviously, as we said, we'll we'll miss him in our family and but he'll always be memorialized on the heroes of healthcare podcast. So that was fun. We always felt that we were doing a sort of a human being service, I guess, a friendly service, and so we gave them whatever knowledge we had or even said many times you know this, I think you should go to a doctor. HMM, well, I don't know. This is beyond me. You know, I don't know what you have and I think that you know instead of treating yourself. So in that sense, I guess we were directing people in the right path. He will certainly live on and it was when we got together for everyone listening what we talked to, we said we wanted to do this episode and Just Recap Two Thousand and twenty one and talk about all of our favorite episodes and collectively with all the production crew, everyone on who is a staff member on here's of healthcare, everyone said...

...that Ted Wayne Senior was their favorite episode and it was such an incredible way to jump start this and he was. It's one of those episodes where I hope if you haven't had a chance to listen to it, please go back and listen to it, his words of wisdom and how he really I mean, it was like he kind of they changed how healthcare was done back then and it was really remarkable and I hate that he won't be able to be with us for a second episode, but we are so thankful that he was able to really to kick off here as the healthcare and be the inaugural guests and that legacy will always live on and we will always be so appreciative of him. Thanks. Yeah, and it's funny. Years you said earlier, we're in our podcast studio with the two things. We did that in my kitchen on with one with one microphone hooked to my laptop, and he kept asking me, is this going to work? So I remember. So we have come a long way in the year. And Yeah, and he kicked us off. So so as we're starting to wrap up, when close out, let's talk a little bit about you know again, I think when we met as a group to get prepared for today's show, we talked about what were some of the main themes and no surprised here. You know, healthcare heroes or people just like us and not recognized enough. I mean that was really, I think, why we started this shows. We realize that. I've said several, many times during the year that it's to me it's equivalent to military service. You know, you're putting your life on the line and you're sacrificing yourself for the care of others and for a cause that you know and you believe in. So we really here believe that they, these people really are unsung heroes. And maybe covids given him a little more recognition, but they probably deserved it a long time ago. Absolutely, so I think that's good. We touched upon mental health and that's probably something we did in this episode. Talk a bunch of fun, but we want to continue to focus with the show there. You don't see anything different between physical health and mental health. They're both serious issues and they need to be addressed, and we had Dr Kelly Stecker on twice and she did a great job and her...

...advocacy for medical people mental health that, you know, how do we make sure that they're getting the right mental care and, as we say, sometimes it's okay to say I'm not okay, and making sure that that's okay, and her advocacy around changing some of the licensing laws and things like that to allow for this, to allow doctors to be not superhuman exactly, to be able to be vulnerable and still be able to practice and still be able to work through those things. And that, along with like physician burnout, I think those kind of went hand in hand and it's been sad because I've talked to numerous medical folks who are wanting to get out of the medical field all together and it's because they have just reached the maximum levels and they just feel like they can't give any more and it's just it is. It's a mental health issue and it's a physician burnout and issue and hopefully in the new year will be able to see some of that lifted and they can get some relief. But it's certainly a topic that needs to continue to be top of mind and the healthcare community. Yeah, yeah, and it reminds me heather I solo, who is ahead of PA's at Mount Sign I talked about how they were giving resiliency training, you know. So they they didn't want to day really, they didn't want to term it burn out or are you feeling mental stress, because the medical community didn't want to admit that they had it. So they said, how do we give you a resiliency training? And the numbers went through the roof and but I hope that can. That's those are the types of programs we need to continue to administer to keep the strength because, as we know, we have shortage of healthcare workers in the country to begin with. To lose now a lot of them with for burnout, would be difficult and and we also heard from people saying that a lot of them were burnt out and when Delta came around they felt again, I'll go back to my military analogy, was that second tour. A lot of them felt that they couldn't abandon their post because this was surging again and they had to be there. So I think next year we'll be interesting. We're gonna have to continue, as as we just went through in the country what they call...

...the big quit September, the record number of people who left their jobs or the or the great resignation. They're talling it certainly so it'll be interesting to see how the healthcare industry is impacted on that next year to Covid nineteen vaccines, leadership and continue new technology, and that's something I hope we can focus a little bit more on next year to is some of the new innovations, like you said earlier, about what's positive coming out of what we're learning in infectious diseases. I know there's some great work coming out of Vanderbilt University and some of the other areas. I think hopefully we can get some of those folks on the show and just continue to talk about what what, what do we have to look forward to? Absolutely, when there are so many other great episodes to that we didn't even get to mention this time. That apps listen to them all. Yes, look, go listen to all of them. There were so many awesome nuggets in each one and I do hope that in the new year, especially as we do talk about Covid, for example, I hope that we're having a different discussion. We're talking about how now is the country, even though these new deltas are going to continue to form, that it's not. We're not seeing that in hospitalizations. We're seeing it come and go and it's going to be a part of our life from now on. But then, from everything we've learned, we are now also able to influence. Like you said, new technologies and leadership styles are going to be different and that mental health will will begin to really be a priority and everyone will start focusing on that. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know. I think that that's going to be interesting to see. I mean, hopefully the covid starts to become more of a flu, for lack of that term, something we deal with and we treat. I don't think we will go away, but what we'll see, I'll be absolutely we're going around for the journey so talk to me about a couple of the ones you've got coming up that'll be starting to go live in January and who can the our listeners be excited to to listen to? Well, I'm so excited about this and it kind of is breaking away from some of the themes that we have had this year and I think that it's going to kick off the new year with something a little bit different. One of the first podcast of the New Year...

...that's going to be kicking off that I'm really excited about is with Dr Arifa Cassa boy. She is the chief medical editor and VP of medical affairs at Everyday Health Group, and that episode is actually going to kick off on Martin Luther King Day, and what I'm really excited about is for all of you to learn more about everyday healthcom. But they are going to be posting on their website a black health facts page, as well as mlk related health issues, and that's all going to be discussed and talked about and as well as just everything else that she's seeing from the healthcare world and when people go to everyday healthcom, what those searches are, and I was shocked to learn from her that physicians actually go to these websites a lot too. You think that it's people, everyday people just like you and I, but physicians go there too to see what other healthcare professionals are saying about certain about certain diseases and just certain ailments. So I thought that one is really interesting and I'm very excited about that. Yeah, physicians are learners, so that's that's good. That resource, you know, and reminds me of just last week, two weeks ago, we had the PARANAMD's another resource now coming out for pediatrics. So lots of resources coming out on heroes, a healthcare that we hope you guys all tap into. And again on the website heroes of healthcare, to podcastcom are links to a lot of these sites. But we had some great information on Paranam D. M D was a very I'm not a parent yet, but if I were, that would be a source that I'm using all the time. Yep, absolutely so. So we bring out more resource, but talk about it's great to her having some of these great strong women physicians coming on. I'm excited to the episode with Dr Sandra Ford. Dr Ford just was recently appointed the White House special assistant to the President for Public Health and science, so we're very privileged to have her coming to us. I believe she's gonna be recording live from the White House remark and we're going to talk more about what the current administration is doing and obviously, as we've talked...

...about, on the kron coming out and what's their new position on that. But also, I know she's going to share with her really why she's passionate about the role that she's in, and I won't give it away, but there's been certain things that she's been tasked and chartered to begin to change in our nation's healthcare system. So I think that'll be a lot of fun to hear about and be also informative to have her join us. I can't wait to hear that. It's going to be great. I have another one too that I'm very excited we haven't recorded yet, but Dr Turog Patel, and he's right in our backyard. He's he's in the Atlanta area and that's where we're we record from. But he is the well star Asist, a VP of population help, and I'm excited to learn a little bit more about how his team brings healthcare awareness to rural communities and even in my pre talks with him it was really interesting to learn that so many of these communities from the from us and from folks who live, you know, maybe in a metropolitan area. We have healthcare news being pushed at US constantly, but so many of these more rural areas it's not that they are choosing to, for example, not get vaccinated. You would be shocked at how many of them maybe don't even know where to go to get a vaccination and they still don't. It just takes a lot longer for healthcare advocacy and awareness to get to these areas. So he's going to talk about what his team what they're doing to help with that. Yeah, it's great. Well again see cut theme we heard several times this year was people coming into the facility with covid saying I want to be vaccinated, and that disconnect of that. The vaccine is a prevention, not a cure exactly, and so that'll be great to listen to. You know, how how do we get that message out? How do we be clear with that message? And then switching again, continue to stay focused on both kind of the the business side of things as well as the...

...medical side. I had a great privilege of interviewing Dr Tony Reid, who's the EVP and Chief Medical Officer Temple University System in Philadelphia, and it's going to be an interesting, really issuing story because the this the facility and the system was bank basically bankrupt. They were financially in a very bad position and it'll be great for listeners to hear the story about how they turn that whole thing around and through the middle of it it this was happening. So the the financial stress came right before covid and covid happened and they were able to use covid to leverage better services and a lot of better things that you use under utilized buildings. It's really a great story. You'll be interesting to hear not so much the medical side, but how the the financial side and the corporate business sides of hospitals. I think we all just think that those the hospital systems mint money, but a lot of them are in financial stress and they're trying to hold on because they serve a purpose in the community and we need them there. So we do need them. That one will be a great one to listen to and kind of like you said, take us away from the everyday issues and just here a success story for this hospital. Right. So, in wrapping up, I think it's been a fun year. Thanks for joining me on this journey. I have been so excited and thank you for taking this leap. And this was your brain child and you were able to create this heroes of healthcare podcast and I know that it wasn't easy to get this off the ground and now that I'm getting to come in and kind of right on your coat tails a little bit, I certainly appreciate it. But thank you for giving this outlet to all of these healthcare heroes and for us to be able to spread awareness about these healthcare issues and for them to have a platform to also talk about their healthcare heroes. Yeah, yeah, I love that that. We always ask kind of WHO's your favorite, and it's been interesting. So many of them are, I guess not surprising, but it's parents, right, I mean it's so, I know it was for me and I know for you you have healthcare in your family as...

...well, and so I think it's been great to hear how many people are had had those strong parental mentors in their lives and the people who kind of we foundation, foundational for them. I would say if we put all the heroes that were shouted out in categories, parents by far are the winners here. So so let's keep you Aya for the parents right. Yeah, without a doubt, and cheers to two thousand and twenty two. Let's bring it on. Yeah, yeah, we're ready for it. So thanks again for everybody for listening. Thank you, Olivia, for for jumping in here on on our journey together, and our producers and our loyal listeners and everybody who makes us possible. We just wish you guys all the happy and healthy holiday season and best of luck for wonderful two thousand and twenty two. At a doubt, goodbye, bye. Thanks for listening to heroes of healthcare. I'm REX Biverston from sweet fish media and we're the proud producers of this show and many other top be tob podcasts. If you've got a podcast and need a hand, or you're considering adding a show to your marketing strategy, give us a shout. Just had too sweet phish Mediacom. You've been listening to heroes of healthcare for more. Subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit us at heroes of healthcare podcastcom.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (40)